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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Devonshire). Sa a chev. betw. three dolphins embowed ar. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet an antelope’s head.
2) (Cromer, co. Norfolk and Ballesford, co. Suffolk). Arms the same. Crest—A dolphin embowed ar.
3) (Gloucestershire, granted 1653). Gu. a chev. erm, betw. three pheons or.
4) (Gloucestershire). Gu. a chev. erm. betw. three escallop shells or.
5) (Chilwick, co. Hertford). Gu. a chev. quarterly erm. and ermines, betw. three pheons or. Crest—An eagle’s head erased gu. gorged with a mural coronet ar. holding in the beak an acorn, slipped, leaved vert.
6) (Huntingdonshire). Sa. two lions pass. or.
7) (London, granted 31 December, 1612). (Little Missenden Abbey, co. Bucks). Gu. three pheons ar. on a chief of the second a bar nebulee az. Crest—A demi tiger sa. bezants, maned and tufted or, holding a broad arrow shaft gu. feathers and pheon ar.
8) Gu. a chev. betw. three pheons or.
9) Az. a lion ramp. ar.
10) Gu. a chev. ermines betw. three pheons or. Crest—A demi tiger ar. pellettee betw. the paws a fire-ball sa.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Arnold Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Arnold Origin:

Germany, England

Origins of Arnold:

The surname of Arnold is said to have been prominent in the German and English cultures, from which it originated. This surname is said to have derived from the personal names of Ernault or Arnolt, both of which have compounded separate elements. Both of these personal given names are composed of the element “arn” which can be translated to mean “an eagle” and the element of “wald” which can be translated to mean “to rule.” This surname of Arnold is also possibly a locational surname. This means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. The locations from which this surname is possibly derived include the English village of Arnold in East Riding of Yorkshire, and the other village named Arnold in Nottinghamshire.

Variations:

More common variations are: Arnould, Arnot, Arnott, Yarnold, Arnoldi, Arnhold, Arnoldo, Arnoldy, Arnolda

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Arnold is found within the country of England. One person by the name of William Arnold, who was mentioned as living in the county of Suffolk in the year 1277. This record was created under the reign of one King Edward I of England, who was known throughout the ages as “Edward Longshanks,” and also as “The Hammer of the Scots.” King Edward I was such named for the many brutal wars and conquests that he waged on Scotland during his reign. King Edward I ruled from the year 1272 to the year 1307. Those who bear the surname of Arnold within the country of England can be found in high concentrations in the areas of Yorkshire, into Lancashire, Essex, Kent, Sussex, and Middlesex counties, as well as the areas in and around the city of London.

Germany:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Arnold within the country of Germany can be found in the year 1282. One person by the name of Adler Arnold was recorded as living in the area of Meskirch in the year of 1282.

Scotland:

Within the country of Scotland, there are many people who bear the surname of Arnold. The areas with the largest populations of people who carry this surname include many areas throughout the southwestern area of the country of Scotland. The counties with the highest concentrations of people who are known by the surname of Arnold include Ayrshire, Dumfries-shire, and Lanarkshire counties.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th Century, many European citizens migrated to the United States of America. This movement, which was referred to as The European Migration, was the result of disgruntled European citizens, and the living conditions that they encountered. Those who migrated to the United States of America with the surname of Arnold can be found in high concentrations in the states of Georgia, Iowa, Wisconsin, New York, Washington, Ohio, Texas, Illinois, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, California, Missouri, and Kentucky.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Arnold: United States 158,728; England 24,016; Uganda 16,990; Australia 10,910; South Africa 10,283; Canada 9,044; Nigeria 5,808; France 5,756; Switzerland 5,591; Brazil 5,199

Notable People:

Edward Zachery Arnold, who was a politician from America and who was also the Georgia State Auditor from the year 1938 to the year 1941

Zach Arnold, who was Democratic politician from America who was a Georgia delegate to the Democratic National Convention for the year 1940

Willian Wright Arnold (1877-1957) who was a Democratic Politician from America, who was also the Illinois 23rd District Representative to the United States House of Representatives from the year 1923 to the year 1935

William R. Arnold, who was a politician from America, and who also was a Bishop, and the United States Army Chief of Chaplains, as well as a speaker for the Democratic National Convention in the year of 1948

William Hendrick Arnold (born in 1861) who was a Democratic politician from America who was also a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention in the year 1892 as well as the year 1904 and the year 1916

William Charlie Arnold (1851-1906) who was a Republican politician from American, and who was also a Representative for Pennsylvania in the 28th District to the United States House of Representatives

Arnold Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Arnold blazon are the chevron, dolphin and pheon. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, sable and gules .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.10The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

In the days before television and the internet it was a rare heraldic artist that had ever seen a dolphin for real, so we should not be surprised that the heraldic representation is not instantly recognisable. Despite this, we should not forget that these artists considered the dolphin to be the king of fish, playing the same role as the lion in the animal kingdom. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin For reasons not immediately clear, Wade suggests that the dolphin was regarded as an “affectionate fish, fond of music”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

2 Comments

  • SFC Jack R. Arnold says:

    Many Arnolds are known to have lived and continue to live in Upper Eastern Tennessee, North Carolina, Northwestern Arkansas, West Virginia, Virginia, and Road Island. It is estimated that there are some 6.5 million Arnolds living in the United States alone, this, as of the 2010 United States Federal Census. Performing genealogy for the Arnold surname can be daunting and unbelievably time-consuming. Generally speaking there are the Northern Arnolds and the Southern Arnolds, ranging geographically from the Atlantic Coast to the Pacific Coast, and, into the Pacific Basin. The Arnold surname represents one of the most prolific families in all of Western Heritage, with several similar name variations. Each variation seems to have the same essential characteristics: wald and eagle; essentially meaning, be strong like an eagle; lead like an eagle, eagle leader, etc. A young woman, surname Arnold whose Christian name presently escapes me, immigrated from England to British Colonial America on the May Flower. A William Arnold and his family immigrated from England to British Colonial America (ship not confirmed as of this writing} landing in Massachusetts and subsequently removing to Road Island and Providence Plantations. Several hundred Arnold men of American descent have fought in the American War of Independence and several thousand fought in the War of the Southern Rebellion. Arnold men have likely fought in all of the North American Wars, certainly the French and Indian War and possibly as early as the King Phillip War, Arnold men fought in the War with Mexico, in the Indian Wars, both before and after the Civil War, and, all overseas wars, starting with the Spanish-American War and the Philippine War of the late nineteenth century in the modern era. Whether or not there were Arnold men serving in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps and fought against the Barbery Pirates in the Mediterranean–a war which consumed all of some thirty years, has as yet to be determined as of this writing. Among the great men of arms is General of the Air Force (five stars) Henery “Hap” Arnold, the first, and, thus far, the only officer of such rank to serve in the United States Air Force. Having said this, several Arnold men have graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York and have risen to General Officer rank, two such graduates served as commanding generals of U.S. Army divisions during the War in the Pacific. One Arnold was Command Sergeant Major of the 75th Ranger Regiment. My Great, Great Grandfather, 1SG William Charles Edward Arnold was First Sergeant of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 13th Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry, U.S.A., serving during the period of the Civil War. While many Arnold men fought and died in service to the Confederate States Army, the great majority of the Arnold families remained loyal to the Constitution and the Flag, and the men of those families fought to preserve the Union. Reputedly two of the earliest known kings in pre-England, as it is presently understood were named Arnold, apparently, it seems, they were father and son. With respect to those two kings, remember that 1400’s England, is the first known country to adopt the practice of surnames, principally for those of royal and/or aristocratic birth. 1600’s England is also the first known country to adopt the practice of incorporating middle names. /signed/ V/R Jack R. Arnold, SFC, 18B, U.S. Army Special Forces (Ret.), e-mail address: c.n75thinf@yahoo.com

  • SFC Jack R. Arnold says:

    Correction to line six: As reads: A young woman, surname Arnold, should read Ann Arnold. Disregard” whose Christian name presently escapes me”. Line nine immediately following American War of Independence”. Should read: as well as the War of 1812-1814. Line nine continues, as it reads: “and several thousand fought in the War of the Southern Rebellion”. Should more correctly read: ” and several hundreds of Arnold men fought in the War of the Southern Rebellion, under the Battle Flag (The Stars and Bars) of the Confederate States Army. Line ten as reads following “the King Phillip War,” should be corrected to read: “the King Phillip War, the King William War, and the Queen Ann War,” Line 16 and 17 following “the War in the Pacific”. New sentence to read: Those general officers were Lieutenant General, then Major General William Howard Arnold, commanding the 23rd (Americal) Infantry Division, who went on to command the Fifth United States Army; Major General Archibald “Archie” Vincent Arnold, Pacific War divisional commander; Major General Richard William Arnold, U.S. Army Chief of Chaplains and Bishop of the Holy Roman Catholic Church; as well as, Major General William Richard Arnold, and, Brigadier General Milton Wylie Arnold. Several other American Soldiers, surnamed Arnold, have risen to become General Officers in the United States Army following the Second World War. I cannot speak to the possibility of Arnold men in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, or the U.S. Coast Guard who rose to become Flag Officers, nor can I speak to those Arnold men who might have risen to General Officer rank in the U.S. Air Force. Richard Robert Arnold is the only man known to this writer to qualify as a NASA Astronaut and to serve his country in space. Lines nineteen and, twenty, as reads: “as it is presently understood were named Arnold, apparently, it seems, they were father and son.” Should more correctly read: were Ynyr or Ynir, King of Gwentland who flourished about the middle of the twelfth century, and who paternally descended from Ynyr or Ynir, the second son of Cadwaladr, King of the Britons”, all three of whom were of ancient Welsh ancestry, this pedigree is as recorded in the College of Arms of the present-day, United Kingdom. /signed/ V/R Jack R. Arnold, SFC, 18B, U.S. Army Special Forces (Ret.). e-mail address is as above

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
10. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111