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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Brightwell and Holcombe, co. Oxford, Baron Carleton and Viscount Dorchester, created baron 1626, and viscount 1628, extinct 1637, see Lowndes Stone, of Brightwell). Ar. on a bend sa. three mascles of the first. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet an unicorn’s head crined ar. armed barry or and sa. Supporters — Dexter, an unicorn sa. crined and hoofed ar. armed barry sa. and ar.; sinister, a leopard ppr.
2) (Viscount Carleton, of Clare, co. Tipperary, extinct 1825). Motto—Quaerere verum. Same Arms. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an unicorn’s head ar. horned and maned gold. Supporters— Two leopards guard, spotted ppr. each collared dancettee az.
3) (Clare, co. Tipperary, and Greenfield, co. Cork). Motto—Nunquam non paratus. Ar. on a bend sa. three mascles of the field. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an unicorn’s head ar. the horn twisted of the first and second.
4) (Surrey, Bedfordshire, Linton, Cambridgeshire, and London). Arms same as Viscount Carleton. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an unicorn’s head sa. the horn twisted of the first and second.
5) (Weting, co. Norfolk). Or, a lion ramp. gu.
6) (Carleton, near Penrith, Cumberland). Erm. on a bend sa. three pheons ar. Crest—A dexter arm embowed ppr. vested to the elbow gu. doubled erm. holding in the hand a javelin ar.
7) (Baron Dorchester). Motto—Quondam his vicimus armis. Erm. on a bend sa. three pheons ar. Crest—A dexter arm embowed and naked to the elbow, shirt folded above the elbow ar. and vested over gu. the hand grasping an arrow in bend sinister, point downwards ppr. Supporters— Two beavers ppr. the dexter gorged with a mural coronet, the sinister with a naval coronet, both or.
8) (Market Hill, co. Fermanagh). Erm. on a bend sa. three pheons ar. Crest—A dexter arm embowed, holding an arrow ppr. the arm naked to the elbow, the shirt folded above it ar. and vested above it gu.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Carleton Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Carleton Origin:

England, Wales

Origin of Carleton:

Carleton is a fascinating and uncommon surname, which is the combination of two origins – Old Norse and Anglo-Saxon. It is a regional name from any of the great areas called Carlton, or Catleton organized throughout England, but especially in the north and east areas of the country, where there were several Scandinavians established. The area name means “an agreement or hamlet of the independent laborers.” It was acquired from the word “ceorlatun” from Olde English pre 7th Century which converted into the Scandinavianised “karlatun.” The fundamental components of the name is associated with the Olde English “ceorl,” which means an independent laborer, producer, and the Olde English word “tun,” which means Hamlet or establishment or agreement. Regional surnames were changed frequently when ancient citizens of an area migrated from one place to another, generally to search for work, and were recognized there by the name of their place of birth. Previous examples of the surname consist of Anabella de Carleton (Yorkshire, 1379) and Geoffrey de Karlton (Bedfordshire, 1273). Mary Carlton, at the age of 23 yrs, arrived from London on the ship “Bonaventure” bound for Virginia in January 1634, was one of the most previous listed name holders to establish in the New World.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Careleton, Carleteon, Carletonn, Caroleton, Carletone, Ccarleton, Carlton, Carelton, Carilton, Corleton.

England:

The surname Carleton first originated in Herefordshire, but one family was found at Whitton in Shropshire in ancient times.

The very first recorded spelling of the family name was shown to be that of Reginald de Karleton, which was dated 1272, in the “Lincolnshire Hundred Rolls.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” 1272 – 1307.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Carleton settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Carleton who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Edward Carleton, who arrived in Rowley, Massachusetts in 1638. Hen Carleton, who landed in Virginia in 1642. John Carleton, Thomas Carleton and Arthur Carleton, all came to Maryland in the same year in 1668.

Some of the people with the name Carleton who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Mark Carleton arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1711. Joseph Carleton landed in New England in 1715 and Richard Carleton, who landed in North Carolina in 1739.

Some of the people with the name Carleton who settled in the United States in the 19th century included M Carleton and J Carleton, both arrived in New York, NY in 1816. William Carleton at the age of 25 landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1864.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Carleton who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Cormick Carleton, at the age of 49 arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship “Condor” in 1838. Ellen Carleton arrived in Nova Scotia in 1841.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Carleton who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Charles James Carleton and Caroline J. Carleton both arrived in Adelaide, Australia in the same year in 1839 aboard the ship “Prince Regent.” J Carleton arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Cromwell” in 1849.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Carleton who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Hugh Carleton arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Portland” in 1864. James Carleton arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Santon” in 1870.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Carleton: United States 5,815; England 602; Northern Ireland 227; Ireland 175; France 122; Russia 4; Australia 321; Scotland 85; Canada 1,295; New Zealand 147.

Notable People:

Billie Carleton (1896–1918), was a British artist.

Christopher Carleton (1749–1787), was a British Army commander.

Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton (1669–1725), was an English politician and leader.

Hugh Carleton (1810–1890), was a New Zealand leader.

James Henry Carleton (1814–1873), was an American Major League player.

Jesse Carleton (1862–1921), was an American golfer.

Carleton Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Carleton blazon are the mascle, bend, pheon and unicorn. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, ermine and argent .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The mascle is a close relative of the lozenge or diamond shape, but with the centre cut away revealing the background underneath. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle. Guillim, writing in the 17th century reckoned the mascle to represent the mesh of a net, being the biblical symbol for “persuasion, whereby men are induced to virtue and verity”. 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111