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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Northumberland). Sa. two bars vaire ar. and vert.
2) Sa. a cross engr. erm. Crest—A hand gu. holding a grenade fired ppr.
3) Sa. a cross ar. guttde de poix.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Hallom Coat of Arms and Family Crest

The origins of the Hallom name come from when the Anglo-Saxon clans ruled over Britain.  The name Hallom originally derived from a family having resided in Hallam, a place name found in Yorkshire and Derbyshire.  In Yorkshire, Hallam appeared in the South Riding. Further research revealed that the name is derived from the Old Scandinavian word haIIr, or from the Old English word hall, both of which meant “stony.”  The place name meant “the stony place, the place at the rocks.” In Derbyshire, there is a place called West Hallam and another called Kirk Hallam. These names acquired from the Old English word halh, which meant “remote nook of land.”  Kirk in the Old English meat “church;” the name as a whole would be “church in a remote place,” while West Hallam was a “remote place in the west.”  More common variations are: Halloum, Hallm, Halom, Halloumi, Hallouma, Hallam, Hallum, Hollom, Hallem, Hellom.

The surname Hallom first found in Yorkshire at Hallam or perhaps at Halling, a hamlet on the North Downs in the northern part of Kent that dates back to the 8th century when it first recorded as Hallingas. Some of the first North American settlers carried this name or one of its variants as James Hallam who settled in Maryland in 1741.  William Hallam settled in Barbados in 1680 with his servants.  Thomas and William Hallam settled in Newcastle Co. Del. in 1855.

Hallom Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hallom blazon are the bar, cross engrailed and guttee de poix. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and ermine.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67. The pattern engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

The gutte or goutte is an elongated tear-drop shape with wavy sides and usually appears in large number spread evenly across the field. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gouttes Some frequently do they occur that special names have arisen for the various colours, guttee de poix being vert (or green) for its obvious resemblence to peas!

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gouttes