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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(co. Norfolk). Gules a bell or, between three fleurs-delis argent. Crest—A unicorn's head couped or, semde-de-lis azure between two laurel branches vert.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Ringer Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Ringer Origin:

England, France

Origin of Ringer:

There are two possible origins of this fascinating ancient name, the first origin of this unique surname evolved originally from the Old French particular name“Reinger”, or Rainger, a combination of the Germanic components “ragin”, guidance and ‘geri’, weapon. This name was made known by the Normans after their big victory in the year 1066. One of the original name holders, Richard Renger, purchased land in Essex, which was known as ‘Renggers’ in 1318, and is now known by Ringer’s Farm Terling, Essex. The name may also be a professional name for a ring maker or for a bell ringer, developing from the Middle English ring(en), an improvement of the Old English pre 7th Century ‘hringan’. According to early recordings of the surname is the writing of John Ringer on March 17 1579, at King’s Colne. Thomas Ringer married Lettes Johnsone, on February 5, 1562, at St. Leonards.

Variations:

More common variations are: Rainger, Wringer, Ringera, Reinger, Ringeri, Rinnger, Ringero, Ringerr, Rinager, Ringery.

England:

The origin of this surname first found in Nottinghamshire, where people held a family seat in early times

The very first recorded spelling of the family name was shown to be that of Richard Renger, dated 1225, in the Patent Rolls, London, during the administration of King Henry III, who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” 1216-1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and different spelling varieties of the original one.

United States:

People with the Ringer surname settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th and 19th centuries. Some of the people of the Ringer family who settled in United States in the 18th century included Jacob Ringer who landed in New York in 1709. Andreas Ringer, at the age of 17 years, arrived in Pennsylvania in 1738. Anna Ringer, John Fredk Ringer, aged 23 and Johann Jacob Ringer who arrived in Pennsylvania in the same year in 1743.

The following century also saw many people with the Ringer surname arrive. People who settled in 19th century in the United States included Andrew Ringer, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1819 and John Ringer, who arrived in Mobile, Ala in 1858 during 19th century

Australia:

Some of the Ringer family who settled ultimately in Australia included David Ringer, at the age of 25, a chef arrived in South Australia in 1858 abroad the ship “Stamboul” during the 19th century.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Ringer: United States 5,896; England 871; Germany 975; Austria 262; Canada 318; Israel 200; France 196; Poland 191; Hungary 131; Brazil 127.

Notable People:

Armand T. Ringer, a nickname that was used by the American writer Martin Gardner. He was a famous American mathematics and a well-known science writer.

Derek Ringer (born 1956), was a Scottish driver. He was born in 1956.

Frederick Ringer (1840-1908), was a British Merchant and a businessman who took over Thomas Glover's role as a leader in the Nagasaki international agreement. Ringer House was eventually established in Glover Garden. From the late 19th to early 20th century, Ringer made great improvements to business and mechanical development at Nagasaki.

Javon Ringer (born 1987), was a Michigan State University running back. He was born in 1987 and last played for the Tennessee Titans in the National Football League (NFL). He was a famous player at Michigan State University and drafted in the fifth round of the 2009 NFL draft.

Jenifer Ringer is a New York Ballet dancer. She joined the New York City Ballet in 1990 and advanced to in 1995. She then took a leave of absence and in the year 2000, was promoted to principal. She retired in 2014.

Mark Ringer (born 1959), was an American Writer and Theater Director. He was born in 1959.

Noah Ringer was an American Actor, born in 1996. He starred in the 2010 film The Last Airbender and also as Emmett in Cowboys & Aliens.

Sydney Ringer (1836-1910), was a British doctor and pharmacologist, well-known for creating Ringer's solution.

Ringer Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Ringer blazon are the bell, fleur-de-lis and unicorn. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, gules and argent .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8.

The bell usually represents the church bell, which is shown in a realistic, shaded form and may have a clapper of a different colour. 9 In the middle ages Church bells were believed to have the power to disperse evil spirits and to summon guardian angels and we can assume a similar meaning for their depiction in a coat of arms. 10

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 11. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”12 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 13

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 14 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The unicorn is an intresting example that is still part of our own mythology today. The unicorn as illustrated on even the most ancient coat of arms is still instantly recognisable to us today, and shares many of the same poses that both lions and horses can be found in. 15. Wade, the 18th century heraldic writer suggested that were adopted as symbols because of “its virtue, courage and strength”. 16

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References

  • 1 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 2 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
  • 3 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 4 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 5 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
  • 6 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
  • 7 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 8 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 9 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bell
  • 10 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P147
  • 11 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
  • 12 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
  • 13 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
  • 14 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
  • 15 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn
  • 16 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85