Ripley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Ripley Family Coat of Arms

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Ripley Coat of Arms Meaning

Ripley Name Origin & History

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Ripley Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Ripley blazon are the lion rampant and pellet. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and azure .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and pellet is a roundle sable, or black. It is also known as an ogress or gunstone. Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Ripley Name

Ripley Origin:

England

Origins of Ripley:

The surname of Ripley can be traced to the country of England, and is said to be a locational surname. This means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have taken a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Ripley, the translation of this surname is said to be “the farm whose land cuts a strip through the forest.” There are many places that bear the name of Ripley in the country of England, such as in Hampshire, Derbyshire, Yorkshire, and Surrey. The place from which the surname hails directly can be correlated to the village of Ripley, which is located in the area of Yorkshire; this place was once known as the forest of Knaresbough, which confirms the meaning of the surname of Ripley.

Variations:

More common variations are: Rippley, Riepley, Ripleya, Ripoley, Riplley, Riply, Riple, Rapley, Ropley, Ripple, Repley, Rebly

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Ripley can be traced to the country of England. One person who was known to bear the name of Bernard de Rippeley, and was mentioned in the document known as the Early Charter Rolls of Yorkshire, in the year of 1175. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry II of England, who was known throughout the ages and commonly referred to as “Henry Curtmantle,” “Henry Fitzempress,” and “Henry Plantagenet.” King Henry II ruled from the year of 1154 to the year of 1189. Other mentions of the surname of Ripley can be found within the country of England as well. One Roger de Rippeley was recorded as living in the county of Northumberland in the year of 1242, while one John de Ripley was mentioned as being a freeman in the city of York in the year of 1330. Those who are known to bear the surname of Ripley within the country of England can be found in large concentrations in the areas of Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Somerset, and the areas in and around the city of London.

 

United States of America:

Within the 17th and 18th Centuries, it became normal for disgruntled European citizens to migrate to the United States of America, which at that time was known as the New World, or the Colonies. This large movement of people was known as the European Migration. Among those who migrated to the United States of America was one person by the name of William Ripley, who arrived in the city of Hingham, Massachusetts in the year of 1630, making him the first recorded person to bear the surname of Ripley within the United States of America.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Ripley: United States 11,663; England 3,017; Canada 1,943; Australia 284; Germany 235; France 233; Scotland 217; Venezuela 201; South Africa 201; Dominican Republic 180

Notable People:

Edward Payson Ripley (1845-1920) who served as the 14th President of Atchinson, Topeka, and the Santa Fe Railway, and who was also a railroad executive from the United States of America.

James Wolfe Ripley (1794-1870) who served as a Brigadier General in the Union Army during the Civil War, and who was from the United States of America.

Arthur Ripley (1897-1961) who was a screenwriter from the United States of America.

Allen Ripley (born in 1952) who was a baseball player from the United States of America.

Alice Ripley (born in 1963) who is an actress from the United States of America.

Alexandra Ripley (1934-2004) who was a writer from the United States of America.

Charles Ripley (born in 1838) who served as a Member of the Vermont State House of Representatives from Poultney in the year of 1880, and again in the year of 1882; and who also served as a Member of the Vermont State Sentate from Rutland County in the year of 1888; and who was a Republican politician from the United States of America.

Charles C. Ripley, who served as an American Independent Candidate for the U.S. Senator from the state of California in the year of 1970; and who served as the same candidate in the year of 1972; and who was a politician from the United States of America.

Ripley Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Cornwall). Per chev. az. and or, three lions ramp. counterchanged.
2) (Ripley, co. York). (Westminster, co. Middlesex; granted 1742). Per chev. dovetailed or and vert three lions ramp. counterchanged. Crest—A demi lion ramp. reguard. vert, collared ar. holding betw. the paws an escutcheon per chev. or and az.
3) (London). Same Arms. Crest—A demi Bengal tiger ducally gorged ppr.
4) Ar. a fess sa. betw. three pellets.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle