Rolland Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Rolland Family Coat of Arms

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Rolland Coat of Arms Meaning

Rolland Name Origin & History

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Rolland Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Rolland blazon are the ship, fesse chequy and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, sable and or .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

We do not need to look far to find the symbolism in the presence of a ship in a coat of arms, they appear regularly in the arms of port towns and merchant companies and families. They usually appear as a three masted wooden vessel known as a lymphad 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Shiop but are often described in some detail as to the disposition of their sails, presence and colours of flags and standards and so on. 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P294

The fesse is a broad horizontal band across the centre of the shield, in very ancient times it was said to occupy one third of the area height of the shield 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117, however it soon became somewhat narrower. This created an opportunity to add decorative edging to the band, of many forms, and to very pleasing artisitic effect, at least close up – it must be admitted that at distance some of the forms are hard to distinguish! Chequy is a repeating pattern alternately coloured squares 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy, any combination of colours may be used. As well as covering the whole field, it can also be used as a patterning on some of the larger ordinaries, as here, in which case there are three rows of squares. Wade, an authority on heraldic meaning groups chequy with all those heraldic features that are composed of squares and believes that they represent “Constancy”, but also quotes another author Morgan, who says that they can also be associated with “wisdom…verity, probity…and equity”, and offers in evidence the existence of the common English saying that an honest man is a ”Square Dealer” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Rolland Name

<h3>Rolland Origin:</h3>
<p>England, French</p>
<h3>Origins of Rolland:</h3>
<p>This interesting surname is of old English origin, and also has two possible origins.   The first origin being from the Norman particular name “Rol(l)ant,” a combination of the Germanic components “hard,” which means fame, and “land,” which means land, region.  The particular name was famous all over the Europe in the Middle Ages as a conclusion of the popularity of one of Charlemagne’s invaders, who had this name.  The second origin is habitational from different areas so called in Derbyshire and Sussex.  The name acquired from the Old Norse “ra,” Roebuck, and “lundr,” which means wood, a cluster of trees.  So, “woodland of the Roebuck.”  Geographical Surnames were introduced when old residents of a place shifted to another place, frequently for the search of work, and there best recognized by the name of their mother town.  The new surname can appear as Rowland, Rol(l)and, Rolance, Rowlands and Rollons.  Documentation from Derbyshire Parish Records consists of the wedding of Humfridus Rowland and Johana Hadfield, in August 1604, at Baslow, and the wedding of Anthony Rowland and Ann Pirson in January 1715, at Eyam.</p>
<h3>Variations:</h3>
<p>More common variations are: Roulland, Rollando, Rowlland, Rollandi, Riolland, Rollande, Rollanda, Rollandy, Rolleand, Rholland.</p>
<h3>Scotland:</h3>
<p>The surname Rolland first appeared in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Air), previously a division in the southwestern Strathclyde area of Scotland, that now makes up the Conference Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire, where they held a family seat from old times and their first registers found on the early Poll rolls derived by the early Kings of Scotland to decide the rate of taxation of their activities.</p>
<h3>England:</h3>
<p>The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Simon Rolland, dated about 1218,  in the “Assize Court Rolls of Lincolnshire.”  It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272.  The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one. </p>
<h3>Ireland:</h3>
<p>Many of the people with surname Rolland had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.  </p>
<h3>United States of America:</h3>
<p>Individuals with the surname Rolland settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th.  Some of the people with the name Rolland who settled in the United States in the 17th century included John Rolland and John Rolland, both settled in Virginia in 1653.</p>
<p>Some of the people with the surname Rolland who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Jacques Rolland, Jacques Rolland and Guillaume Rolland, all landed in Louisiana in 1719.  Louis Antoine Rolland landed in Louisiana in 1720.  Joseph Rolland settled in Louisiana in 1756.</p>
<p>The following century saw more Rolland surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Rolland who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Hraus Rolland, Bran Rolland, Elizabeth Rolland, George Rolland and Mary Rolland, all arrived in New York, NY in the same year 1855.</p>
<h3>Australia:</h3>
<p>Some of the people with the surname Rolland who settled in Australia in the 19th century included William E. Rolland arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Cheapside”.</p>
<p>Here is the population distribution of the last name Rolland: France 31,460; Madagascar 12,113; Nigeria 3,821; United States 3,446; Canada 1,698; Benin 1,289; Uganda 1,120; Germany 1,110; Cameroon 1,090; Ghana 959</p>
<h3>Notable People:</h3>
<p>Andy Rolland (born 1943), is an old Scottish football player.</p>
<p>Antonin Rolland (born 1928), is a resigned French cyclist</p>
<p>Douglas Rolland was a Scottish golf player at the end of 19th century.</p>
<p>James Rolland (1802-1889), was a New Zealand leader.</p>
<p>Jean-Baptiste Rolland (1815–1888), was a Canadian printer, seller of books, trader, and leader.</p>
<p>Matthias Rolland (born 1979), is a French player in rugby union.</p>
<p>Michel Rolland (born 1947), is a French oenologist.</p>
<p>Stéphane Rolland is a French fashion designer.</p>

Rolland Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Disblair, co. Aberdeen, 1672). Motto—Immutabile, durabile. Ar. a fess chequy sa. and or, betw. three ships with sails furled sa. Crest—A fleur-de-lis ar.
2) (Gask, Scotland). Motto—Spes juvat. Ar. a fess chequy sa. and or, betw. two ships with sails furled of the second in chief, and a fleur-de-lis az. in base. Crest—A hand holding a dagger ppr. hilted and pommelled or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Shiop
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P294
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489