Romney Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Romney Family Coat of Arms

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Romney Coat of Arms Meaning

Romney Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Rumney.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Romney. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Romney Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Romney blazon are the chevron, mullet, escallop and bend. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.10The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Romney Name

Romney Origin:

England

Origins of Romney:

This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is geographical from a place so called in Kent, which was frequently used as the name of a river. The first component seems to acquire from the Old English pre 7th Century “rum,” which means large, but its structure and meaning are unknown. The second component obtained from the Old English “ea,” river. The place name was first noted as “Rumania” in the Anglo-Saxon records of Essex in 1052. A copied of Romney is appeared noted as “Ruminingseta” in the Saxon records of 697, and means “the fold of the Romney people.” Geographical Surnames acquired when old residents of a place transferred to another area, normally to search for work, and were best recognized by the name of their mother town. The new surname can appear as Romney and Rumney. An early traveler to America was one Thomas Romney, at the age of nineteen years, who set sail from London on the “Speedwell,” bound for “Virginia” in May 1635. The naming noted in Kent of Daniell, son of Richard Romney, in December 1594 at Davington.

Variations:

More common variations are: Romnney, Romne, Romny, Roomaney, Rommeney, Rumney, Romany, Ramney, Romine, Romane,

England:

The surname Romney first appeared in Kent where they held a family seat as kings of the castle of Romney, anciently Romenel. “[New Romney], the name of which perhaps acquired from the Saxon Rumen-ea, “a large watery area, or marsh,” derived from the sense of Old Romney.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert de Romenel, dated about 1086, in the “Domesday Book of Kent.” It was during the time of King William I, who was known to be the “The Conquerer,” dated 1066-1087. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Romney had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Romney landed in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Romney who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas Romney who settled in Virginia in 1635.

Individuals with the surname Romney who landed in the United States in the 18th century included John Romney settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1767.

The following century saw more Romney surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Romney who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Auguota Romney at the age of 40, who landed in America, in 1893. Axel Romney who settled in America from London, in 1898.

Some of the people with the surname Romney who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Cecil Romney, who landed in America from Kingston, in 1906. Elizabeth Romney settled in America from Grays, England, in 1907. Annie Romney, who landed in America from Manchester, England, in 1909. Annie M. Romney, who migrated to the United States from South Stafford, England, in 1916. Alice Romney, who immigrated to America from Kingston, Jamaica, in 1920.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Romney who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included G. K. Romney arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “British Empire” in 1880. Thomas Romney also arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “British Empire” in 1880. H. Romney arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “British Empire” in the same year 1880.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Romney: United Stats 2,330; Mexico 288; France 269; England 237; Brazil 191; Anguilla 154; Netherlands 128; Canada 82; British Virgin Islands 78; Australia 50.

Notable People: Elwood Romney (1911–1970), was an All-American basketball player at BYU. Francis Romney (1873–1963), was an English cricket player. Dick Romney (1895–1969), was a Utah State football coach.

Romney Family Gift Ideas

Browse Romney family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Berks). Ar. a chev. voided betw. three mullets pierced sa.
2) (Tedbury, co. Gloucester, and London; William Romney, Alderman of London, d. 1611, son of William Romney, and grandson of Robert Romney, both of Tedbury. Visit. London, 1568). Az. on a bend cotised ar. three escallops gu.
3) (London; granted 16 Dec. 1593). Same Arms. Crest—Two cubit arms embowed vested az. cuffed ar. hands ppr. holding an escallop gu.
4) (Lulsley in Suckley, co. Worcester). Or, on a chev. per pale az. and gu. three roses of the field. Crest—On a mount vert a tree ppr. thereunder a lion statant guard, gu. Motto—Mors ærumnarum requies.
5) (Sheriff of London, 1603). Az. on a bend cotised ar. three escallops gu.
6) Or, on a chev. per pale az. and gu. three roses of the field. Crest—A lion statant guard. ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
10. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91