Rowe Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Rowe Family Coat of Arms

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Rowe Coat of Arms Meaning

Rowe Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Row, Rawe.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Rowe. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Rowe Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Rowe blazon are the paschal lamb, trefoil, beehive and torteaux. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and vert .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The lamb may refer either to the young of the sheep, in which case it is shown entirely in profile, or to the paschal or holy lamb, which turns to face the viewer and has both a halo and a flag on a pole. The flag may be charged with additional items. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lamb Its significance is obviously religious in nature, “befitting one a brave, resolute spirit”, according to Guillim. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

The beehive appears in heraldry in its natural, rounded form, not the wooden box of the honey farm. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bee-hive In meaning it can treated in the same way as the bee symbolising “well governed industry”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P70

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Rowe Name

Rowe Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Rowe is an English surname. The surname could derive from a minimum of three possible origins. The first of these possible origins of the surname of Rowe is that it is a topographical surname. This topographical surname would have described someone who lived either by a hedgerow, or possibly lived near a row of houses. Either way, this surname derives from the Old English Pre 7th Century word “raw” which can be translated to mean “row.” The second, and more likely possible origin of the surname of Rowe is that it may derive from the medieval given names of “Rou” or “Roul” which both come from the ancient Germanic personal name of Rolf, or is a shortened version or nickname for someone who had the name of Rowland. Rowland was said to be a Germanic of Frankish personal name which appeared during the time of Charlemagne the Great in the 8th Century. Rolf can be translated to mean “renowned wolf” while Rowland can be translated to mean “renowned land.”

Variations:

More common variations are:

Roowe, Roewe, Rouwe, Rowey, Rowie, Rowei, Rowee, Rhowe, Rowue, Rowea, Row

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Rowe was found in the country of England and in the year of 1195. This person, who was recorded to be named one Geoffrey le Ruwe, was recorded and mentioned in the document called the Pipe Rolls of Leicestershire. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of King Richard I of England, who was known as, and commonly referred to throughout history as “The Lionheart.” King Richard I of England ruled from the year od 1189 to the year of 1199. Other mentions of the surname of Rowe in the country of England include Richard le Rowe, who was mentioned in the Assize Rolls of Cheshire in the year 1226, while Walter le Rowe was mentioned in the Pleas of the Forest of Epping, Essex, in the year of 1246. Those who bear the surname of Rowe can be found in the country of England in the city of London and the southwestern counties of Cornwall and Devon.

Scotland:

In the country of Scotland, there is a small population of people who bear the surname of Rowe. These people are found in higher concentrations in the areas of Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire and Midlothian counties.

United States of America:

In the 1600’s, European citizens began the European Migration, which was when they left their homeland in search of a better life. The United States of America, which at that time was referred to as the New World, was an area that was not explored, but promised religious freedom, work, and better living conditions, so it was a high traffic area. The first settler in America who bore the surname of Rowe was one Mary Rowe, who landed in Virginia in the year 1620. Those who bear this surname are found in New York, Massachusetts, Ohio, Pennsylvania Illinois, California, and the state of Maine.

Caribbean

A Rowe line settled in Jamaica and owned plantations. The name eventually passed onto black slaves who escaped captivity.

Rowe Today:

United States 79, 043

England 24, 398

Australia 14,411

Canada 8,418

Jamaica 6,711

South Africa 5,223

New Zealand 3,183

Wales 1,355

Kenya 1,255

Scotland 1,024

Notable People:

Zebulon Rowe, who was the Postmaster at Presque Isle, Maine, in the year 1857 to the year 1859, and who was a Democratic politician from America

Winthrope Price Rowe (1929-2011) who was a Democrat politician from America, and was a Professor at University, was also the Chair of the Ingham County Democratic Party for the year 1972

William H. Rowe, who was a Member of the Maine State House of Representatives from Cumberland County in the year 1919 to the year 1920, and was a Republican politician from America

William H. Rowe, who was a Delegate to the North Dakota State Constitutional Convention from Dickey County in the year 1889, and was a politician from America

William G. Rowe, who was the Mayor of Reading, Pennsylvania from the year 1881 to the year 1885, and was a politician from America

William Rowe, who as an Alternate Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Illinois in the year 1960, and was a Democratic politician from America

Willette L. Rowe, who was a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Washington in the year 200, and was a Democratic politician from America

Thompson T. Rowe, who was the Mayor of Billings, Montana in the year 1949 to the year 1953, and was a politician from America

Rowe Family Gift Ideas

Browse Rowe family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Tolesby Hall, co. York). Motto—lnnocens non timidus. (Lamerton, co. Devon. Visit. 1620. The elder branch became extinct by the death of the only son of Nicholas Rowe, the poet; a younger branch was settled at Tavistock). Gu. three paschal lambs or, staff, cross, and banners ar. Crest—A paschal lamb, as in the arms.
2) (co. Cornwall). Gu. three paschal lambs or.
3) (co. Lincoln, 1640). Gu. a trefoil slipped or, betw. three paschal lambs ppr.
4) (Macclesfield, co. Chester; granted 20 Mareh, 1653). Ar. a beehive beset with bees diversely volant sa.
5) (co. Cornwall). Az. two greyhounds in full course ar.
6) (co. Devon and co. Kent; Sir William Rowe, Knt., Lord Mayor of London 1592, and Sir Henry Rowe, Lord Mayor 1607). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three trefoils slipped per pale gu. and vert as many bezants.
7) (Sir Thomas Rowe, Knt., Lord Mayor of London 1569, son of Robert Rowe, second son of Robert Rowe, Esq., co. Kent. Visit. London, 1568). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three cinquefoils slipped per pale gu. and vert as many bezants, a crescent for diff. Crest—A stag’s head gu. attired or, charged with a crescent for diff.
8) (Colchester, co. Northampton). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three trefoils slipped per pale vert and gu. as many bezants. Crest—A stag’s head gu. attired or.
9) (London). Ar. a chev. az. betw. three trefoils slipped per pale gu. and vert.
10) (London). Per pale sa. and ar. on a chev. three trefoils, and in chief two martlets, all counterchanged.
11) (co. Middlesex). Gu. a quatrefoil or.
12) (Lewes, co. Sussex; confirmed 24 May, 1614, by Segar, Garter, to John Rowe, of Lewes, co. Sussex, gent.). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three lions' heads erased gu. Crest—Out of a ducal crown or, a demi lion gu. holding in the paw a Polish mace in pale sa. spiked and pointed ar.
13) (Norton Place, co. Sussex). Ar. on a chev. betw. three trefoils slipped az. as many bezants. Crest—A stag's head erased gu. attired or, on the neck a crescent ar.
14) (Kingston in Staverton, and afterwards of Bearton, in Broad Hempston, co. Devon, said to be derived from a Kentish family. The late John Rowe, Esq., of Bearton, the descendant of John Rowe, Serjeant-at-law, temp. Henry VIII., took the name of Hussey on inheriting the estates of Hussey, of Marnhull, co. Dorset). Ar. a chev. az. betw. three trefoils gu. Crest—A stag's head issuant gu. attired or.
15) (Windley Hill, co. Derby ; granted 1612 to Robert Rowe, Esq., of Windley Hill, and his brother Robert Rowe, of London). (Bristol). Or, on a bend cotised az. betw. six trefoils slipped vert three escallops of the first. Crest—An arm vested erminois, the hand ppr. holding a trefoil slipped vert.
16) (Alport, co. Derby; five descents given in Visit. 1611). These are the arms described in the Visitation, and as shown on the monument in Youlgrave Church to Roger Rowe, Esq., who d. in 1613 Gu. on a bend betw. three garbs or, as many crosses pattee fitchee of the field. Crest—An arm in armour ar. round the wrist a scarf gu. in the hand a sword of the first, hilted or, holding up a wreath vert.
17) (as granted to Roger Rowe, of Alport, appears among the records of the Heralds' Office) Per pale or and gu. a lion ramp, within an orle of trefoils all counterchanged. Crest—An arm embowed vested gu. holding a garb or.
18) (Sir Francis Rowe, knighted at Dublin Castle, by Sir George Cary, Lord Deputy of Ireland, 29 Sept. 1603). Gu. on a bend betw. three garbs or, as many crosses pattee fitchee of the field. Crest (Reg. Ulster's Office)—An arm embowed in armour, holding in the hand a sword all ppr. the blade thrust through a wreath of oak leaves vert, pommel and hilt or, lied round the wrist with a ribbon gu.
19) (Ballycross, co. Wexford; confirmed to John Rowe, Esq., of Ballycross, J. P. and D.L., and to the descendants of his grandfather, Ebenezer Radford Rowe, Esq.). Gu. on a bend engr. betw. three garbs or, as many crosses pattee fitchee of the field. Crest—An arm embowed in armour ppr. round the wrist a scarf gu. in the hand a sword ar. hilted or, holding up a wreath vert, the arm charged with a cross pattee fitchee also gu.
20) (Tavistock and Lamerton, co. Devon. Visit. Devon, 1620). Same Arms, quartering, for Rurde, Gu. three paschal lambs couchant ar.
21) (Kingston, co. Devon; John Row, Esq., of Kingston, was born 1544, aged 76 years at Visit. Devon, 1620; descended from Rubon Row, of co. Kent, temp. Edward III., had, inter alias, an elder son, George Row, aged 40, and a third son, John Row, then living in Ireland). Ar. a chev. az. betw. three trefoils slipped per pale gu. and vert. Crest—A buck’s head couped gu. attired or.
22) (Tavistock and Lamerton, co. Devon. Visit. Devon, 1620). Same Arms, quartering, for Rurde, Gu. three paschal lambs couchant ar.
23) (Conington, co. Huntingdon; John Row, Visit. Middlesex, 1663, son of William Row, of Conington). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three trefoils per pale gu. and vert as many bezants. Crest—A roebuck’s head couped gu. attired or.
24) Az. a buck’s head cabossed or
25) Ar. two bars engr. sa.
26) (Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office, 1673). Gu. a quatrefoil or.
27) (Scotland). Motto— Non desistam. Or, a fess chequy az. and ar. betw. three crescents gu. on a canton az. an orange stalked and slipped ensigned with an imperial crown both ppr. Crest— An armed arm issuing holding a sword ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lamb
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bee-hive
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P70