Rudd Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Rudd Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Rudd Coat of Arms Meaning

Rudd Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Ruddall, Rudde.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Rudd. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

rudd coat of arms

Rudd Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Rudd blazon are the catharine wheel, bell, lion rampant and buglehorn. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, gules and azure .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The Catherine wheel is an extraordinary device, being a large, spiked wheel, the instrument of martyrdom of St. Katherine. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wheel

The bell usually represents the church bell, which is shown in a realistic, shaded form and may have a clapper of a different colour. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bell In the middle ages Church bells were believed to have the power to disperse evil spirits and to summon guardian angels and we can assume a similar meaning for their depiction in a coat of arms. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P147

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

Rudd Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Rudd Name

RUDD

The surname Rudd is Anglo-Saxon. It derives it origins from one of two sources. First it is believed to be geographical, referring to someone who lived near a cross or “rood” in medieval English. Secondly, it was thought to be a nickname given to a person with red hair.

Surnames in England prior to the Norman conquest were largely unheard of and for the most part did not catch on until the late 16th century. In the small settlements and villages which existed during earlier times, residents found little need for surnames as everyone in these communities new each other and a given name would usually suffice. Over time; however, population growth and expansions of communities where villages gave way to towns and cities, the addition of a qualifier in the form of a surname, became almost a necessity as it allowed the distinguishing of people, one from another. Therefore one person may have been identified by their given name plus their occupation while another may have been identified by their given name and one of their parent’s names. There was a boundless supply from which surnames could be formed, in addition to the use of patriarchal/matriarchal names or reference to the individuals occupation, there were things such as defining physical traits, a familiar geographical location or a topographical landmark found near the individuals home or birthplace, the name of the village in which the person lived, and so much more. Surnames also served the practical purposes of allowing governments an easier way to track people for census, tax, and immigration records.

One drawback found to exists in these records were the variations in spelling of many surnames. The variation in spelling during this time period is attributed to a lack of continuity in guidelines for spelling, compounded by the diversity of languages in use in Europe at this time in addition to the fact that many scribes spelled phonetically. The variations in the spelling of the surname include but not limited to; Rudd; Ruddy; Rood; Rudman; Rut; Roud; and Rutt among others.

The earliest record of any variation of this surname is that of Gerard Ruddle which appears in the Lancashire tax rolls from 1189. These rolls, were a series of census and tax records kept by the English Treasury by order of King Richard I. These records span a period of over 700 years with the oldest dating back to the 12th century. They hold the distinction of being the oldest consecutive set of records detailing English governance in the United Kingdom.

One of the first recorded immigrant to America bearing the surname or any variation of the spelling was John Rudd who arrived in 1670 and settled in Maryland. Mary Rudd landed and settled in Pennsylvania in 1682 and John Rudd arrived and settled in Virginia in 1698.

There were also many immigrants to the British Commonwealth countries of Australia and New Zealand bearing the surname Rudd. James Rudd landed in 1836 and settled in Australia. William and Fanny Rudd along with their children, Lizzie and Kate, landed in 1874 and settled in Auckland, New Zealand. Brothers.

Worldwide, the highest concentration of people with the surname Rudd are found in Australia, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, the United States, and Ireland. By state, the largest percentile of those with the surname Rudd live in Idaho, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Utah.

There are many notable people with the surname Rudd. Sir Nigel Rudd is a British entrepreneur and businessman.

Rudd is a Fellow of the ICAEW. During his career he has been the Chairman of BAA Limited, Pilkington PLC, The Boots Company, and Pendragon PLC. He has also held the office of Deputy Chairman of Barclays PLC. Rudd founded one of the United Kingdoms biggest industrial holding companies in 1982, Williams Holdings.

Rudd has been on the board of directors for BAA Aviation since 2013 and previously served as a board member for Longbow Capital from 2004 until 2013 and Pendragon PLC from 1989 until 2010.

For his service to the manufacturing industry, Rudd was knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 1996. He is a Deputy Lieutenant of Derbyshire, a Freeman of the City of London, and in 2010 he was named Chancellor of Loughborough University.

Rudd Family Gift Ideas

Browse Rudd family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More rudd Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Or, on a bend az. three catharine wheels ar. Crest—A hawk’s head erased or.
2) (Aberglasney, co. Carmarthen, bart., extinct 1730; Rice Rudd, Esq., of Aberglasney, son of Anthony Rudd, Bishop of St. David's 1593-1614, was created a bart. 1628, the fourth bart. d. s. p.). Az. a chev. erm. betw. three bells ar. Crest—An arm erect vested az. charged with a chev. erm. holding in the hand a scroll all ppr.
3) (Higham Ferrers, co. Northants; confirmed by Camden, Clarenceux, 1623). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. a lion ramp. or, a canton of the last; 2nd and 3rd, ar. three greyhounds in full course sa. collared or. Crest—A lion ramp. or, holding betw. the paws a shield az. charged with a canton gold.
4) (cos. Essex and Lincoln). Ar. on a canton az. six martlets or. Crest— A cross botonnée or.
5) (Abergavenny, co. Monmouth). Az. a lion ramp or, a canton of the second. Crest—A lion ramp. or, holding a shield az. charged with a canton gold.
6) (Rev. Eric Rudd, of Thorne, near Doncaster, was claimant of the Scottish barony of Duffus, son of the late Rev. James Rudd, Rector of Newton Kyme, co. York, by Elizabeth his wife, eldest Bister and co-heir of James Sutherland, Lord Duffus). Mottoes—Over the arms: Pro rege et grege; under the shield: In cruce salus. Az. a lion ramp. or, a canton of the second, quartering, Gu. three stars or, for Sutherland. Crest—An arm vested az. charged with a chev. erm. holding in the hand a scroll all ppr.
7) Ar. three trefoils in fess vert, a chief sa. Crest—A griffin’s head couped ppr. collared ar.
8) Ar. on a chev. betw. three buglehorns stringed gu. as many lozenges or.
9) Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three buglehorns gu. as many mascles or.
10) Az. a lion ramp. ar. a canton or.
11) Or, on a bend sa. three catharine wheels ar.
12) Or, three catharine wheels az.
13) Or, on a bend az. three catharine wheels of the field.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wheel
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bell
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P147
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141