Rumsey Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Rumsey Family Coat of Arms

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Rumsey Coat of Arms Meaning

Rumsey Name Origin & History

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Rumsey Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Rumsey blazon are the talbot, label and cinquefoil. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and argent .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.3The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Many breeds of dog appear in coats of arms, reflecting their status as man’s closet companion. The talbot is a hunting dog akin to a terrier, and usually illustrated in a lifelike style and eager pose. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog In common with the other heraldic dogs, Wade suggests that their presence should suggest “courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68 Others might say we need look no further than a pleasure in the hunt and the affection for this sturdy breed.

The label holds a special place in heraldry, originlly being a temporary mark, used by the oldest son while his father was still alive. In appearance it is a horizontal bar near the top of the shield from which descend 3 or 5 “points” or small rectangles descending from the bar. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Label In more recent use it has come to used as charge in its own right 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P154 and may have additional charges on each point, which can create a pleasing visual effect.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Rumsey Name

Rumsey Origin:

England, Scotland

Origin of Rumsey:

The origin of this unique and interesting surname originally evolved from Anglo-Saxon and is a locational surname acquired from the region called Romsey in Hampshire. The region name was earlier listed in the Saxon Charters of 966 as “Romeseye”, and in the Book of Domesday in the year 1086 as “Romesy”. The regional name means “Rum’s Island”, which was acquired from the Olde English pre 7th Century name “Rum”, a simple form of combined names with the first component “rum”,” wide” , or ‘renown”, with the Olde English word ‘ey”, island or dry land in a mire. Occasionally names were provided to those old citizens who left their homes to live in another region. In the modern era, the surname was found as Romsey, Rumsey, Romsay, and Rumsay. John de Romesy recognized in 1328, in Kirby’s Quest for Somerset. A prominent name bearer was Walter Rumsey (1584 – 1660), a Welsh judge for the provinces of Brecknock, Glamorgan, and Radnor, who was a suggested fighter of the Royal Oak in the year 1660. A national monogram was rewarded to the Rumsey family in the division of Brecon.

Variations:

Some common variations are: Rumssey, Rumsy, Rmsey, Ramsey, Romsey, Rumsay, Rumsie, Remsey, Rumasy, Rimsey.

England:

The surname Rumsey originated in Huntingdon, where the first documentation of the name was Simund de Ramesie who verified the license by Turstan filius Leuingus of the parish of Livingston to the Abbey of Holyrod (1153 – 1156).

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Walter de Romesy, dated 1327, in the “Subsidy Rolls of Somerset”. It was during the time of King Edward III who was known to be the “Father of the Navy,” dated 1327 – 1377. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varietions of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Rumsey had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Rumsey settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Rumsey who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Robert Rumsey, who arrived in Fairfield, Conn in the year 1664.

Some of the people with the name Rumsey who settled in the United States in the 19th century included B. Rumsey at the age of 39, landed in America from England, in 1893. Charles Rumsey, aged 28, emigrated to the United States from London in the year 1893. Albert E. Rumsey at the age of 15, who emigrated to the United States, in 1894. Elma Rumsey at the age of 21 also emigrated to the United States, 1896, during the 19th century.

Some of the people with the name Rumsey who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Charles E. Rumsey, who landed in America, in 1905. D.P Rumsey at the age of 24 and Rumsey, aged 5, both people emigrated to America from Northampton, England in the same year 1908. Edna Rumsey at the age of 5 years settled in America, in the year 1908 during the 20th century.

Canada:

People with the name Rumsey who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Robert Rumsey, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Rumsey: United States 6,253; England 1,726; Zambia 903; Australia 310; Namibia 163; Canada 398; South Africa 219; New Zealand 95; Wales 56; Scotland 39.

Notable People:

David Rumsey is an American map representative and the creator of the David Rumsey Map Collection. He is also the administrator of topography associates.

James Rumsey (1743–1792) was an American mechanical engineer, who was very famous for displaying a boat driven by machinery in the year 1787 on the Potomac River at Shepherdstown in present-day West Virginia before a large assembly of local media, including Horatio Gates. A pump driven by steam power through a flow of water on the side of the boat and with this was remarkably able (at the time) to push the boat forward.

Rumsey Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(co. Brecon). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, argent a fess gules in chief a label of four points azure; 2nd and 3rd, azure a cinqucfoil within a bordure ermine. Crest—A talbot pass. azure collared or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Label
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P154
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil