Salt Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Salt Family Coat of Arms

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Salt Coat of Arms Meaning

Salt Name Origin & History

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Salt Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Salt blazon are the chevron rompu and mullet. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, azure and sable .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries, being in the form of an inverted ‘v’ shape 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevron. There is a special, and rather striking variant known as the chevron rompu, where rompu appears to mean “broken”. There have been several variants observed over time, but all of them involve the central, upper part of the chevron being broken away to create a very distinctive effect 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P125.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Salt Name

Salt Origin:

England

Origins of Salt:

This name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is an English geographical surname from the town of Salt in Staffordshire, noted as “Selte” in the Domesday Book of 1086, and as “Salt” in the 1167 Pipe Rolls of that division. The name acquires from the Olde English pre 7th Century “selte” which means a salt-pit. At the start of the century, there were salt works within two miles of the town. Geographical Surnames were regularly derived by local landholders, or by the king of the palace, and particularly by those old residents of a place who had shifted to another area, and were there best recognized by the name of their mother town. The surname from this source first listed at the end of the 12th Century. One William de Saut shows in the 1203 Staffordshire Pleas Rolls and an Alyce Salte in the Burial Registers of St. James’ parish, Clerkenwell, London, dated 1599. William Salt (1805 – 1863) was a Staffordshire antiquary who made archaeological collections from the division. He was also a part of the Royal Society of Literature.

Variations:

More common variations are: Sault, Sealt, Salat, Salto, Salti, Salta, Salet, Salut, Salot, Salte

England:

The surname Salt first appeared in Staffordshire where the surname is infinite and there is a hamlet named Salt located there. During the rule of Henry III., Ivo de Saut held one knight’s fee in Saut, of the Barony of Stafford.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Nicholas de (of) Salt, dated about 1199, in the “Assize Court Rolls of Staffordshire.” It was during the time of King Richard 1 who was known to be the “The Lionheart,” dated 1189 – 1199. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Salt had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Salt landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Salt who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Salt, who landed in Virginia in 1663.

People with the surname Salt who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Joseph Salt, who landed in America in 1760-1763.

The following century saw more Salt surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Salt who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Samuel Salt, who landed in New York in 1843.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Salt who came to Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Maurice Salt U.E. who settled in St. Andrews, Charlotte Division, New Brunswick near the year 1784 member of the Port Matoon Association.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Salt who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Thomas Salt, English prisoner from Derby, who shifted aboard the “Andromeda” in October 1826, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. Abraham Salt, aged Esther, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Sir Charles Forbes” in 1839. Richard Salt, Ann Salt and Richard Salt, all arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Samuel Boddington” in the same year 1849.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Salt who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included William Bates Salt came to Nelson aboard the ship “Clifford” in 1842. Thomas Salt, Jane Salt, Edward Salt and Eliza Salt, all arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Mary Shepherd” in the same year 1870.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Salt: England 5,775; Turkey 2,550; United States 1,387; Australia 880; South Africa 822; Canada 718; Philippines 451; New Zealand 395; Namibia 326; Germany 303.

Notable People:

Charlotte Salt (born 1985), is an English actress.

Edward William Salt (1881–1970), was a British leader.

Henry Salt (Egyptologist) (1780–1827), was an English artist, explorer, and politician.

Salt Family Gift Ideas

Browse Salt family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (London). Az. a chev. rompu betw. three mullets or. Crest—On a chapeau az. turned up erm. a demi ostrich, wings expanded ar. in the mouth a horseshoe sa.
2) (Yoxall, co. Stafford). Or, a chev. rompu betw. three mullets sa. Crest—An eagle displ. sa.
3) Ar. a chev. rompu betw. three mullets sa. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a demi ostrich, wings displ. or, holding in the beak a horseshoe sa.
4) (granted to Henry Salt, H.M. Consul-General in Egypt, 2 May, 1816). Per chev. rompu sa. and or, in chief three mullets of the first and in base an ibis ppr. on a chief ar. a mount vert, thereon a lion couchant ppr. looking towards a double cross gu. planted on a rock on the sinister also ppr. Crest—A pedestal ar. thereon a figure representing a sphinx of red porphyry with human arms extended, in the dexter hand a pyramid or.
5) (Saltaire and Crow’s Nest, both co. York, bart.). Motto—Quid non Deo juvante. Ar. a chev. indented betw. two mullets in chief and a demi ostrich displ. holding in the beak a horseshoe in base or. Creat—Upon a rock an alpaca statant ppr.
6) (Weeping Cross, co. Stafford; granted to Thomas Salt, 2 April, 1849). Ar. a chev. rompu betw. three mullets in chief and a lion ramp. in base sa. Crest—Three annulets interlaced sa. thereon a dove holding in the beak an olive oranch ppr. and charged on the neck with a chev. also sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevron
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P125
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105