Sarsfield Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Sarsfield Family Coat of Arms

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Sarsfield Coat of Arms Meaning

Sarsfield Name Origin & History

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Sarsfield Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Sarsfield blazon are the fleur-de-lis, per pale and leopard’s face. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

The background of the shield can be divided into two potrtions in a variety of ways, and each portion treated differently. In the heraldry of continental Europe there is a tendency to use these areas to combine two different designs, but in British and Scottish heraldry the preference is to treat the divided field as a single decorative element with other features placed as normal. Whatever tradition is followed, one of the most common divisions is per pale, a simple separation along a vertical line. Wade assigns no particular meaning to the use of this division, but suggests that they simply arose from the multi-coloured garments typically worn at the time of the birth of heraldry. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P56

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Sarsfield Name

Sarsfield Origin:

England, Ireland

Origins of Sarsfield:

This unusual surname can be considered as being an Irish name as documentation of a similar record dates back as early as the 12th Century. However, the de in the recording of Williemus de Sharisfeld (1252) which develops in the Pipe Rolls of Cloyne, Co. Cork, shows that it may be a geographical name from a place in England, probably one of the expected seven to ten thousand lost hamlets and villages which vanished from maps in Britain. Required clearing of old residents to make way for sheep meadows in the 14th Century and also the Black Death of 1345, were the prime causes of these departures. Members of the family settled in districts Cork, Limerick, and Dublin. Documentation contains one Mary Sarsfield who married William Fanshaw in September 1675, at St. Mary – St., Marlebone Road, St. Marylebone, London. Elizabeth Sarsfield married Thomas Goodson in September 1687, at St. James Dukes Place, London, and Ignations Sarsfield married Jane White at St. Michan, Dublin in January 1697. Patrick Sarsfield received from James II command of the Irish troops in England and followed the King to Ireland in 1689. He fought at the Boyne in 1690.

Variations:

More common variations are: Sarsefield, Saresfield, Sarsfeld, Sarsfeild, Sarsfiled, Sarcefield, Sorcefield

England:

The origins of the surname Sarsfield appeared in Cheshire where people held a family seat from old times. Some say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Thomas de Sarsfield, dated about 1172. It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be the “The Builder of Churches,” dated 1154 – 1189. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Sarsfield had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Sarsfield landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Sarsfield who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Will Sarsfield settled in Georgia in 1734.

The following century saw more Sarsfield surnames come. Some of the people with the surname Sarsfield who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Monarch Sarsfield came in Philadelphia in 1871.

Canada:

People with the surname Sarsfield settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in 18th and 19th Some of the individuals with the surname Sarsfield who came to Canada in the 18th century included Garrett Sarsfield, who landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1749.

The following century saw more Sarsfield surnames arrive. People with the surname Sarsfield who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Patrick Sarsfield, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1838. Bridget Sarsfield, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1839.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Sarsfield: United States 1,031; England 618; Argentina 328; Ireland 186; Canada 185; Portugal 120; Australia 41; Scotland 26; New Zealand 26; Spain 8

Notable People:

Catalina Sarsfield was a Franco-Irish Jacobite and wife of Theodore of Corsica

Dalmacio Vélez Sársfield was an Argentine politician.

David Sarsfield (died 1710), was an Irish Jacobite.

Eugene S. Sarsfield (April 1902–July 1943) was an officer of the United States Navy during World War II.

Francis Sarsfield was an Irish attorney of the 17th century.

James Sarsfield, 2nd Earl of Lucan (1693-1718), was a Franco-Irish Jacobite.

Mairuth Sarsfield was a famous writer.

Patrick Sarsfield, 1st Earl of Lucan (c. 1660–1693), was an Irish Jacobite officer.

Pedro Sarsfield (d 1837), was a Spanish officer of the Peninsular War and First Carlist War.

Peter Sarsfield was an Irish landowner of the 17th century.

William Sarsfield was an Irish public director of the 16th century.

William Sarsfield (died 1675), was an Irish landholder.

Sarsfield Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Cork; founded in Ireland by Thomas de Sarsfield, “Premier porte banniere du Roi Henry II.” a.d. 1172). Per pale ar. and gu. a fleur-de-lis counterchanged.
2) (Lucan, co. Dublin; descended from Sir William Sarsfield, Knt., Mayor of Dublin 1566, when he was knighted by Sir Henry Sydney, Lord Deputy of Ireland; his great-grandson, Patbick Sarsfield, Esq., of Lucan, co. Dublin, who was deprived of his estates by Oliver Cromwell, but restored by Charles II., had two sons: I. William, his successor at Lucan, m. Mary Fitz Rov, illegitimate dau. of Charles II., and sister of James, Duke of Monmouth, and had a dau. and heiress, Charlotte Sarsfield, wife of Agmondesham Vesey, Esq., of Lucan, by whom ahe had two daus. and co-heirs, viz., 1) Anne, m. Sir John Bingham, Bart., ancestor of the present Earl of Lucan; and 2) Henrietta, m. Colonel Cæsar Colcloügii, of Tintcm Abbey, co. Wex¬ford, whose descendant, representative, and heir is Mrs. RosaoaouGn-Colclough, of Tintern Abbey; 2) Patrick, the celebrated general of James 11. at the siege of Limerick, created by James II., after his abdication, Earl of Lucan, 1693, fell at the battle of linden, 1693). Per pale gu. and ar. a fleur-de-lis per pale of the last and sa.
3) (Viscount Kilmallock-, attainted 1691; Sir Dominick Sarsfield, chief Justice of the Common Pleas in Ireland, was created a bart. 1619, and a peer 1624; the third viscount was attainted for his adherence to James II.). Motto—Virtus non vertitur. (Tully, co. Kildare; Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office, 1619, Eleanor, dau. of Patrick Sarsfield, Esq., of Tully, and wife of George Wolveston, Esq., of Rabock, co. Dublin). Same Arms, a crescent for diff. Crest—A leopard's face or. Supporters —Two wolves az. cach collared and lined or.
4) (Doughcloyne, co. Cork, formerly of Sarsfleld Court, same co.). Same Arms Crest—A leopard's face or. Motto—Virtus non vcrtitur.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P56
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65