Scarlett Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Scarlett Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Scarlett Coat of Arms Meaning

Scarlett Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Scarlett. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

scarlett coat of arms

Scarlett Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Scarlett blazon are the lion rampant, canton, chequy and angel. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, gules and ermine .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

“The canton stands very high among honourable bearings”, according to Wade, a noted symbologist 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48. The canton is a square shape, normally occupying the dexter chief of the shield. An early example is SUTTON, Bishop of Lincoln in the 13th century, who bore “argent a canton sable”. It occupies less space than a quarter and hence is sometimes added to an existing shield to difference branches of the same family, or, when a charge is added to it, to indicate some honour has been recieved 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Canton. Wade remarks, that, in common with all square features can be associated with the virtue of“constancy”.

Chequy (a word with a surprising number of different spellings!) is what is known as a treatment, a repeating pattern usually used to fill the whole background of the shield with a series of alternately coloured squares 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy. These squares are usually quite small (there should be at least 20 in total), giving the appearance of a chess board, but any combination of colours may be used. It can also be used as a patterning on some of the larger ordinaries, such as the pale and fess, in which case there are three rows of squares. Wade, an authority on heraldic meaning groups chequy with all those heraldic features that are composed of squares and believes that they represent “Constancy”, but also quotes another author Morgan, who says that they can also be associated with “wisdom…verity, probity…and equity”, and offers in evidence the existence of the common English saying that an honest man is a ”Square Dealer” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

Scarlett Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Scarlett Name

Scarlett Origin:

France

Origin of Scarlett:

It is an interesting, and unusual surname belonging to a Norman French origin and a metonymic professional name for a trained worker of clothes coloring or a wealthy marketer, brilliantly colored clothes, usually of a brightly, shining red color. The beginning of the name is associated from the Old French word “Escarlate,” which means color, which by 1182 was used as the name of cloth, specifically blazing red cloth. The initial source of the name was associated with the Latin word “Scarlata.” The present surname originated in two spellings forms as Scarlet or Scarlett. One Gregory Skarlett registered at the University of Oxford’s records in 1506. Sir James Yorke Scarlett (1799 – 1871) managed the hold of the heavy company at Balaclava in 1854 and selected to order the full British Cavalry in the Crimea on his arrival to England he ordered the Aldershot camp from 1865 – 1870.

Varations:

More common variations of this surname are: Scarlette, Scarletta, Scarletto, Scarletti, Scarleett, Scarllett, Scarlet, Scarlletta, Scarleto, Scorlett.

England:

The surname Scarlett first originated in Essex, where they held a family seat from very ancient times and was accepted by Duke William of Normandy. One of the most famous documentation of the name consist of Will Scarlet, (Scarlett, Scarlock, Scadlock, Scatheloke, and Scathelocke) an outstanding member of Robin Hood’s Merry Men who first came in the most ancient remaining Robin Hood balled. A Story of Robyn Hode, published between the years 1492 – 1534.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William Scarlet, which was dated 1185, in the Records of the Templars in England, (Oxfordshire). It was during the period of King Henry II, who was known to be “The Builder of Churches,” dated 1154 – 1189. The origin of surnames under his rule became a basic requirement for the determination of personal taxation.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Scarlett settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Scarlett who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Samuel Scarlett settled in Boston in 1630 and Ann Scarlett landed in Virginia in 1664.

Some of the people with the name Scarlett who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Anne Scarlett arrived in Virginia in 1702. Tho Scarlett, who arrived in Virginia in 1706. Thomas Scarlett, who landed in Virginia in 1714. Catherine, James, and Robert Scarlett, all came to Philadelphia between the years 1775 and 1840. James Scarlett, who arrived in New York in 1794.

Some of the people with the name Scarlett who settled in the United States in the 19th century included John Scarlett settled in New York in 1820. Edward Scarlett and Richard Scarlett both arrived in St Clair County, Illinois in 1870. Robert Benjamin Scarlett landed in Mississippi in 1882.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Scarlett who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Scarlett, at the age of 32 and Fanny Scarlett at the age of 28 both arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Assaye” in the same year in 1874. Daniel Scarlett at the age of 40, Harriet Scarlett, at the age of 40 and Sarah Scarlett at the age of 10, all arrived in Nelson aboard the ship “Adamant” in the same year in 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Scarlett: United States 5,182; England 2,296; Jamaica 3,498; Brazil 350; Germany 202; Mexico 183; Australia 992; Scotland 158; Canada 1,041; New Zealand 372.

Notable People:

Andre Scarlett (born 1980), is an English professional football player.

Austin Scarlett (born 1983), is an American fashion designer and entertainer.

Connor Scarlett (born 1992), is an English artist.

Francis Muir Scarlett (1891–1971), was an American justice.

Francis Rowland Scarlett (1875–1934), was a senior commander of the Royal Air Force.

James Yorke Scarlett (1799–1871), British officer and hero of the Crimean War.

John Scarlett (1777–1865), Canadian merchant.

John Scarlett (born 1947), former Australian rules football player.

Ken Scarlett (born 1927), Australian writer.

Matthew Scarlett (born 1979), is an Australian rules football player.

Niara Scarlett was a British musician and composer.

Peter Campbell Scarlett (1804–1881), was a British politician.

Sir Peter W.S.Y. Scarlett (1905–1987), was a British minister.

Reginald Scarlett (born 1934), is an ancient West Indian cricket player.

Robert Scarlett (born 1979), is a Jamaican football player.

Sir William Anglin Scarlett (1777–1831), was a senior judge of Jamaica.

Scarlett Family Gift Ideas

Browse Scarlett family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More scarlett Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (West Bergholt and Copsford, co. Essex, 1611). Chequy or and gu. a lion ramp. erm. a canton az. Crest—Two lions’ gambs erased erm. supporting a pillar gobony or and gu. capital and base of the second.
2) (Baron Abinger). Motto—Suis stat viribus. Chequy or and gu. a lion ramp. erm. on a canton az. a castle triple-towered ar. Crest—A Tuscan column chequy or and gu. supported on either side by a lion’s gamb ermines erased gu. Supporters—Two angels vested ar. tunics az. wings or, in the exterior hand of each a sword in bend ppr. pommel and hilt gold.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Canton
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100