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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Nuremberg, Windsheim Coupé au 1 d'azur au lion léopardé d'or au 2 d'or à une fleur-de-lis d'azur Cimier la fleur-de-lis entre deux proboscides coupées d'azur sur or ou un lion issant d'or entre un vol du 2. English: Per fess 1st azure a leopard (lion affronty) or 2nd or a fleur-de-lys azure Crest: the fleur-de-lys between two proboscides per fess azure over or (alternatively) a lion issuant or between a pair of wings of the 2nd.
2) Allemagne Coupé au 1 de sable au lion léopardé d'or tenant entre ses pattes un tourteau de gueules bordé d'or au 2 d'argent à une grenade au naturel la tige en bas Casque couronné Cimier le lion issant Lambrequin à dextre d'or et de sable à senestre d'argent et de gueules. English: Per fess 1st sable a leopard (lion affronty) or holding between its paws a roundel gules bordure or 2nd argent a grenade proper the fuse downwards Crowned with a helmet Crest: the lion issuant Mantling: to the dexter or and sable to the sinister argent and gules.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Scheller Coat of Arms and Family Crest

The surname Scheller is a Westphalian-German nickname.  Such surnames were very common in Westphalia.  They were picked from traditional eke-names or added names, which showed physical characteristics of their bearers.  Scheller is a hereditary surname for a person who was either wild or clamorous.  The name originally acquired from the German word "schel," which means "noisy" or "loud." More common variations are: Schoeller, Schueller, Scheuller, Schealler, Schaeller, Schieller, Scheoller, Scheeller, Schelluer.

The surname Scheller first found in Westphalia, where the name emerged in old times as one of the notable families of the region. From the 13th century on the surname recognised with the great social and economic evolution which made this territory a landmark contributor to the advancement of the German nation.  As early as 1526 they had their seat at the manor Schellenberg near Essen.

Some of the people with the name Scheller who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Johan Scheller, who arrived in New York in 1709.  Friederich Albrecht Scheller, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1752.  Martin Scheller, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1764.  Johann Geo Friederich Scheller, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1771.  George Frederick Scheller, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1771. Some of the people with the surname Scheller who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Mr Scheller, who arrived in America in 1846.  August Scheller, aged 22, who arrived in New York, NY in 1849. Dorothea Scheller, who landed in New York, NY in 1850.  Sophia Scheller, who arrived in New York, NY in 1850.  Wilhelm Scheller, who settled in Texas in 1852.

Scheller Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Scheller blazon are the lion passant and fleur-de-lis. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 6 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 7. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 8

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 9. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”10 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 11

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References

  • 1 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 4 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
  • 5 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 6 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
  • 7 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
  • 8 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
  • 9 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
  • 10 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
  • 11 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489