Scudder Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Scudder Family Coat of Arms

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Scudder Coat of Arms Meaning

Scudder Name Origin & History

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Scudder Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Scudder blazon are the fess, pellet and cinquefoil. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and sable .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and pellet is a roundle sable, or black. It is also known as an ogress or gunstone. Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Scudder Name

Scudder Origin:

England

Origin of Scudder:

It is an interesting and unique surname which belongs to an Ancient English origin. It is also a professional name for a detective or investigator, which acquires from the Middle English (1200 – 1500) word “scut”, from the Ancient French word “escoute” associated with the word “escouter” which means ‘to hear’, itself from the Latin “auscultare”, and the Middle English agent addition“er”. Professional surnames authentically represented the real profession of the name holders, and after sometime appeared genetic. Previous documentation of the surname consists of William le Scutt (1222), John Scutard in the Hundred Revolution of Cambridgeshire, 1279; William le Skut, in the 1327 premium Revolution of Sussex and William Skutt in the 1545 premium Revolution of Wiltshire. A fascinating name holder, listed in the “Dictionary of National Biography” was Henry Scudder (deceased 1659), a spiritual of Christ’s College, Cambridge, who given to the existing of Collingbourne-Ducis in 1633. He was a representative of the board for American Standard Version in 1648, and he advertised different works, consisting of “The Christian’s Constantly Walke in Holy Securitie and Love.” A National monogram given to a Scudder family of Kent is red on a fess gold, three bullets, in leading as several carving silver.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Scrudder, Scuddero, Sudderw, Scuder, Skudder, Scuddar, Scuderi, Scudero, Scudere, Scudera.

England:

The surname Scudder first originated in Kent where they held a family seat as king of the palace. The Saxon effect of English middle ages declined after the Campaign of Hastings in 1066. French was the language of the court for the next three centuries and the Norman environment succeeded. But Saxon surnames recovered and the family name first given in the 13th century when they held land in that division.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Godwin Scut, which was dated 1183, in the “Pipe Rolls of Norfolk.” It was during the time of King Henry II, who was known to be the “The Builder of Churches,” 1154 – 1189. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Scudder settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Scudder who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas Scudder, who landed in Salem, Massachusetts in 1635. John Scudder, who landed in Salem, Massachusetts in 1647.

Some of the people with the name Scudder who settled in the United States in the 19th century included M S Scudder, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850. A Scudder, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1855.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Scudder who settled in the New Zealand in the 19th century included Thomas Scudder, William Scudder and Richard Scudder, all arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Andrew Jackson” in the same year in 1865.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Scudder: United States 4,955; England 608; United Arab Emirates 23; India 11; Australia 50; Scotland 33; Canada 96; South Africa 3; Sweden 2; New Zealand 19.

Notable People:

Alec Scudder was a famous personality in Maurice (novel) and in a film named Maurice.

Bernard Scudder was a translator who translated historical works from Icelandic to English.

Bertram Scudder was a personality in Atlas.

Edward W. Scudder (1822 – 1893) was a Judge of the New Jersey Supreme Court from 1869 until his death.

Horace Scudder was an American writer.

Henry Scudder (clergyman) (d. 1659), was an English religious figure.

Henry Scudder was a performer in the HBO drama series Carnivàle.

Henry Martyn Scudder, M.D., D.D., was an American teacher and minister

Ida S. Scudder was an American professor and journalist.

Janet Scudder was an American artist.

John Scudder was an American medical professor.

John Scudder (physician), was an American blood scientist.

John Milton Scudder was an Eclectic Medicine specialist of the 19th century.

Scott Scudder was an American baseball player.

Scudder Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(co. Kent). Gules on a fess or, three pellets, in chief as many cinquefoils agent.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil