Shenton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Shenton Family Coat of Arms

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Shenton Coat of Arms Meaning

Shenton Name Origin & History

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Shenton Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Shenton blazon are the wolf, book and plate. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The wolf was the symbol of Rome long before the advent of heraldry, and before that was sacred to the ancient Egyptians. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P31 In heraldry it is probably more often just as head than the whole animal, but when whole it can be in many different poses. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wolf It is found from the earliest instances of arms, but quite often due to a derivative of its French name, loup sharing the initial sound of many family names like LOWE and LOVATT.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. The book is a typical example of this. Books could be open or closed and were usually richly decorated, sometimes described in detail, along with words upon the open pages. Wade tells us that the open book represents “manifestation” while the closed book signifies “counsel”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P146

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and plate is a roundle argent, or white. Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Shenton Name

Shenton Origin:

England

Origins of Shenton:

Listed in the spellings of Shenton, Shinton, and perhaps as Shenston and Shenstone, this is an English geographical surname. It acquires from any one of the different places called Shenton in the divisions of Leicester, Hertford, and in old times, Cheshire, or from Shenstone in the division of Staffordshire. These places all have Old English pre 7th-century origins, the first recorded being that of “Scenctum” in the Anglo-Saxon documents for Leicester in the year 710 A.D. The name meaning perhaps the hamlet (ton) by the bright stream (scen), though other interpretations are possible. Geographical Surnames are given in the first place to the local king of the palace, or more usually they were given to people after they departed from their original mother town. It was then, and it survives today, that often the easiest method of knowing a person, is to call him or her by the name of the place from whence they arrived. In this example, the earliest recordings to be appeared in parish records are the 16th century, and examples contain as Susanna Shenton of Croft, Leicestershire, named there in May 1587, and later Sara Shinton, who married John Robertson at St Giles Parish, Cripplegate, London, in August 1772. The first known example of the surname recording considered to be that of Margaret Shenton, who was an observer at St Dunstans in the East, Stepney, London, in June 1584. It was during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1st, 1558 – 1603.

Variations:

More common variations are: Sheinton, Sheynton, Sheanton, Schuenton, Schuenton, Shinton, Shanton, Shunton, Shendon, Shenten, Shentin.

England:

The surname Shenton first appeared in Staffordshire where they held a family seat as Kings of the Palace. After the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having ruled over King Harold, given most of Britain to his many successful Barons. It was not unusual to find a Baron, or a Minister, with 60 or more Lordships spread all over the country. These he gave to his sons, nephews and other junior lines of his family and they became known as under-tenants. They selected the Norman system of surnames which recognized the under-tenant with his holdings so as to separate him from the senior stem of the family.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Shenton had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Shenton landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th & 19th. Some of the people with the name Shenton who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Samuel Shenton, who came to Barbados in 1678. Jane Shenton, who came to Barbados in 1678. Grace Shenton, who settled in Barbados in 1678. Samuell Shenton, who arrived in Barbados in 1680

People with the surname Shenton who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Nathan Shenton, who arrived in Philadelphia sometime between 1709 and 1710. Nathan Shenton, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1709-1710. Hannah Shenton, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1710. Hannah Shenton who settled in Philadelphia in 1710.

The following century saw more Shenton surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Shenton who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Francis Shenton, who came to Philadelphia in 1861.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Shenton: England 3,243; United States 814; Australia 316; Canada 185; South Africa 183; Wales 79; United Arab Emirates 76; France 61; Scotland 59; New Zealand 38.

Notable People:

Ben Shenton (born 1960), is an American political leader.

Brian Shenton (1927–1987), was a British runner.

Edward Shenton (1895–1977), was an American painter and writer.

Ernest Shenton (1930–2008), was a businessman.

George Shenton, Sr. (1811–1867), was an Australian druggist and trader.

George Shenton (1842–1909), was an Australian businessman and administrator.

George Shenton (footballer) (1899–1978), was an English football player.

Henry Chawner Shenton ((1803–1866), was an English sculptor.

Herbert N. Shenton (died 1937), was a sociologist.

Michael Shenton (born 1986), is an English rugby player.

Richard Shenton (cricketer) (born 1972), is an English cricket player.

Shenton Family Gift Ideas

Browse Shenton family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Az. three wolves’ heads erased or. Crest—A dexter hand holding an open book ppr.
2) Gu. a fess framed ar. betw. three plates.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P31
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wolf
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P146
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle