Shields Coat of Arms

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. six hurts, two, two, and two. Crest—A demi leopard ramp. or.
2) (co. Northumberland). Sa. on a bend betw. two lions’ heads erased ar. three escallops of the first. Crest—A buck pass. ppr. on the breast an escutcheon sa. charged with an escallop ar.
3) (co. Rutland). Gu. on a bend engr. or, three escutcheons sa. Crest—A demi arm couped at the elbow grasping a scymitar. Motto—Pro lege, rege, grege.
4) Gu. a lion pass. guard. betw. three escallops ar.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Shields Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Meaning, Origin, Etymology
(Scandinavian) belonging to Shields; or Dweller at the Huts or Sheds [v. Shiel1] South Shields “was called Le Sheeles, from the sheds built along the shore by the fishermen of the Tyne.”—Nat. Gaz.  (English) Shield’s (Son): v. Shield. (Celtic) = Shiels (q.v.) with the English genit. -s suff. (English) One who came from Shields (shepherd’s summer hut), the name of places in Durham and Northumberland.  North and South Shields, cos. Northumberland and Durham. From Shields; a location name in Durham.
There are at least two distinct families bearing the name Shields.  One, originating among the Scandinavians of northern Europe, found its way into England at about the time of the Norman Conquest; the other traces its ancestry to the Gaels of Persia, who migrated through Egypt and Phoenecia, along the Levant and the northern shores of the Mediterranean into Spain, and thence into Ireland, where their rule was unbroken for more than two thousand years, prior to the Norman Conquest, in 1172.   The English Shields are descended from an early royal family of Denmark, named Soyld. The “soyld” in Anglo-Saxon, or “Skiold” in Danish, becomes “shield” when translated into English, the three forms being identical in meaning. The additional fact that a sketch of this instrument of early warfare is prominently displayed in the coats-of-arms of the various branches of the this Shields family indicates quite clearly the origin of the name.  The Irish Shields derive their name from the old Irish word “siadbal,” the modern form being spelled “shields,” which means cultured, mannerly, polished, debonair. The design on the escutcheon of the family consists of a blue ground, on which are depicted three golden crowns and above them an eagle, in flight, bearing in its beak a streamer upon which is inscribed, in the Irish language, the motto, “Death Before Dishonor.” Blue is Ireland’s own heraldic color; the three crowns are doubtless a vestige of the arms of Munster.  Pre-Christian Ireland was divided into five kingdoms, the southernmost of which was Munster; the clan of O’Brien, whose capital was at Cashel, was the royal family. In the third or fourth century, so the story is told, a younger son of the O’Brien who was the king of Munster, upon attaining his majority, took a portion of his patrimony and traveled over the continent of Europe for some twenty years. On his return he was dubbed a knight and invested with the title “Siadhal,” or “Shields,” which is the Irish form of the name during the Middle ages.  The name refers to the culture and gracious manners the young man had acquired during his travels. In Latin the name becomes “Sedulius.” Caelius Sedulius, known as “The Christian Virgil,” is said to have been the first member of this family known to history. He wrote “Carmen Paschale,” and introduced Rhyms into Latin poetry. Scotus Sedulius, of the court of Charlemagne, was also of this family. A biography of this scholar, by Hellmann, was written in Germany and published in Munich in 1906. There are six Siedhals mentioned in the “Annals of the Four Masters,” collections of the chronological history of early Ireland, between the years 758 to 855. One of these was present at the Council of Rome in 721.  Another was Abbott of Kildare and died in 828. The best known, however and the most important, was Siahdel who, during the reign of the Emperor Lothair, 840-855, was a teacher of Liege, now in the Kingdom of Belgium. It would appear, from what we are able to learn from scholars and historians who are constantly delving into such matters, that the Shields family has been prominent all down through the ages. The earlier members of the family were chiefly distinguished in connection with literature and religion, but in those times Ireland was the center of learning and evangelism for all Europe. At a later date, in the South, particularly in Galway, they were the hereditary guardians of medical secrets. In American History the family is well represented by General James Shields.   The only man who ever represented three states in the United States Senate, a hero of the Mexican and the Civil Wars, whose statue has a niche in the Hall of Fame; by John Shields, one of the little band of explorers, led by Lewis and Clark on the famous expedition to Oregon in 1803; by Meedy White Shields, the eminent Presbyterian divine, for forty years professor of theology in Princeton University; by George O. Shields, a United States Senator from Tennessee. There are many others of note. The mother of President John Tyler was a daughter of a Shields. Another descendant of this family, on his mother’s side, was John Tipton, General in the United States Army, United States Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and United States Senator from Indiana; he was the only son of Janet Shields Tipton.  There are many hundreds of people now living in America, bearing the name of Shields, inherited from one common ancestor, whose kin-ship among each other has never been and probably never can be established.

Spelling Variations
Shields, Shiels, Shiel, Shiell, Shiells, Sheil, Sheill, Sheils, Sheills, Shield, Shields, O’Shiel, O’Shields

Popularity & Geographic Distribution
The last name Shields ranks 5,887th in popularity worldwide as of the 2014 Census and approximately 97,405 people carry the Shields surname worldwide. The name ranks particularly high in the following six states: California, Texas, Pennsylvania, Florida, Illinois, and New York.  It ranks highest in the following countries: United States (66,430), England (9,360), Australia (5,847), Canada (5,080), Scotland (3,442), Northern Ireland (2,099)

Early Bearers of Surname
Roger ate Schelde appears in the 1332 ‘Subsidy Rolls of Surrey’
Willelmus de Scheles in the 1379 ‘Poll Tax Records of Yorkshire’
Thomas of le Schele, which was dated 1274 who was a Juror on an inquisition made at Traqueyr
Alexander Shields or Sheilds (1660-1700), a Scottish nonconformist minister, activist, and author from Earlston
Murtagh O’ Shiel, which was dated circa 1548, in the Records of County Offaly
Connach O’Shiel, Abbot of Ballysodare, appointed Bishop of Elphin by Henry VIII in 1545, who rejected the new doctrines until his death in 1552

Marriages for Shields
John Shield married Elizabeth Bunn on Jan. 16, 1696 in Hatford, County, Maryland
John Shields married Ann Garbut on sep. 8, 1616 in Rosedale, York, England
John Shields married Anne Waynwright on Jan. 31, 1635 in Dronfield, Derby, England
John Shields married Alicia Potter on Jan. 17, 1647 in Rosendale, York, England
Ralph Shields married Hannah Lapisse on Sep. 10, 1662 in Saint Peter, Leeds, York, England
Elizabeth Shields married Christopher Anderson on Jul. 8, 1675 in Saint Leonard, New Malton, York, England
Elizabeth Shields married John Austune in 1676 in Saint Crux, York, York, England
Marmaduke Shields married Ann Grant in 1677 in Kirk Ella, York, England
Anne Hall Shields married Thomas Clarke on Dec. 26, 1695 in Tynemouth, Northumberland, England
Elizabeth Young Shields married James Henry on May 10, 1696 in Tynemouth, Northumberland, England

History, Genealogy & Ancestry
WILLIAM SHIELDS OF COUNTY ANTRIM
In the County Antrim, on the shore of beautiful Lough Neagh, not many years before or after 1600, was born William Shields, from who has descended the most numerous as well as the most prominent Shields race in the New World.  Little is know of his life. In 1633, while residing in County Armagh, there was born to him a son, named James, through whose family line the main thread of this story runs. James had a brother whether older or younger is not known, whose name was William and another, much younger, and whose name was John.  There may have been other members of the family; it has been asserted that there was another named Daniel, but there is no conclusive evidence. William, the father, was one of the victims of Cromwell’s prosecution of the Irish. There have been few, if any, people in the history of the world treated with greater cruelty than the Irish.  England’s treatment of Ireland is one of the most shameful stories of all history; and Cromwell’s part in it is more shameful than the rest. He treated the Irish as if they were not merely intruders, but outlaws in their own land. It required six years and 600,000 lives for him to establish his policy in Ireland. Any Irish who, after May 1, 1654, that were found outside of a small reservation in a desolate tract between the Shannon River and the sea, of which it has been said by of the Commissioners engaged in enforcing the decree, “there was not fuel enough to warm, water enough to drown, or earth enough to bury a man”  They must not go within two miles of the river or four miles of the sea, a cordon of soldiers being permanently stationed with orders there to kill anyone overstepping the limits. Those who were not executed were driven upon slave ships and taken to foreign lands, most of them never to be heard from again. William Shields, the father, is said to have lost his life during the enforcement of this inhuman decree, and his sons for no crime other than that of being an Irishman. William’s sons, James, John and William founded large families in America. William and James were deported to the Barbadoes Islands, in the East Indies in 1655.  They did not stay long there. William is then found at Williamsburg, Virginia. Much information on his family and descendants can be found in the Bruton Church Records of that city. His son, James kept a tavern and an ordinary inn in Williamsburg, and died there in 1727. James Shields, who was a son of the tavern-keeper. Anne, the daughter of James the surveyor, was the mother of Mary Armstead, who married Governor Tyler, of Virginia, and the grandmother of John Tyler, the tenth President of the United States. General John Page Shields, who lost his life while serving in the Confederate Army, was also a great grandson of James, the surveyor.  John who still was a child at the time of the Cromwellian exile, spent his life in Ireland. In 1739, when an old man, he, with his son William then 12, sailed for America. John died en route and was buried in the ocean. William landed at Delaware or Maryland where he lived for two years among his cousins. He later settled at Frederick County, Maryland. His descendants are numerous, and are scattered all over the United States, many of them living in Tennessee and other southern states. John Knight Shields, United States Senator from Tennessee, is a great great grandson of this immigrant William Shields. There is a letter written by the great grandson of James Shields the son of William Shields of County Armagh that tells of James’ life and it is as follows:  “My great grandfather of the Shields side was James Shields. He was born in County Armagh in the year 1635. His father was born in County Antrim, in about the twentieth year of his age he and his brother and many others were arrested by the English and deported to the Barbadoes Islands. He came to Baltimore before 1660. He settled first in Kent County and then in Newcastle. His brother John and family came to America about the year 1738 or 1740. I was a mere child when they arrived. Cousin William lived with us about two years, his father having died on the ocean. The family settled in Frederick County. I have not seen any of them for nearly fifty years. Cousin William has a large family. Great grandfather Shields died when my mother was a little girl. My grandfather was William Shields.  He was born in Kent County in the year 1668. My grandmother on my mother’s side was Jeanette Parker. Aunt Jane was born January 15, 1696. She died in Lancaster County in the year 1709. Uncle James was born in the year 1694. Uncle John was born in the year 1709. They lived first in Chester County and then moved to Augusta County, Virginia. Mother was born on June 3, 1704. She died in Chester County in the year 1742, being stricken with pneumonia. Grandfather was killed by a falling log while helping one of my uncles build a house in Virginia in 1741. Grandmother lived with aunt Jane until her death. Uncle James died about the year 1750. His son John was about my age. He visited us soon after. I have never seen him since then. He was living in North Carolina a few years ago. Uncle Tom died just before the war.  Several of my cousins were in the Continental Army. Uncle Tom’s children moved away and I do not know where they are. Some of them went south I think. Uncle John’s children scattered. One lived in Pennsylvania. One went to North Carolina. One went to Boone’s settlement in Frankland a few years ago. Some of them still live in Virginia. My relatives on mother’s side were all large, strong, long-lived and industrious people. ” More information on this family can be found in a book titled “The Shields Family” By: J.A. Shields

REV. JAMES SHIELDS OF PENNSYLVANIA
Mary Caroline McCormick born April 18, 1817 in Rockbridge County, Virginia.  She received a good early education through private teachers, and completed her course of studies at Staunton.  After the death of her husband, she removed to Chicago, where she now resides. She married May 11, 1847 to Rev. James Shields born December 11, 1812 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and died August 19, 1862 in Prairie du Chien, Wis.  he is the son of James Shields and Frances Perry. His parents came to America from County Tyrone, Ireland in 1811. His father was a contractor and builder by occupation and in religion a strict Presbyterian. Mr. Shields received a collegiate education at Western University, Pittsburgh, where he graduated in 1830.  After completing a full term at the Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian church, he was licensed to preach April 2, 1834. In the spring of 1836, he was ordained pastor of the congregations of Fermanaugh and Tuscarora, in Juniata County, Pennsylvania and continued to preach to the first-named church until his death.  He never enjoyed robust health, and in July 1862, at the solicitation of his brother-in-law, William S. McCormick, he left home for a season of recreation among the streams and lakes of Minnesota, but, on reaching Prairie de Chien, he was taken seriously ill, and died there. Mr. Shields had been previously married; first January 20, 1839 to Hannah McKinstry who died a year after; he married 2nd Mary R. Gracy who left one child, Mary-Gracy now married to William J. Wallace of Newville, Pennsylvania.  James Shields and Mary Caroline McCormick had issue: 1) James-Hall born June 1, 1849; resides in Chicago, Illinois married October 17, 1878 to Nellia Manville Culver of Chicago and had issue i) Irene born November 1, 1879 ii) Nellie-Caroline born February 8, 1881 iii) James-Culver born July 31, 1882. iv) Viola born February 27, 1884. 2) Amanda-McCormick born December 25, 1850 married November 23, 1880 to Harry C. Tillman of Detroit, Michigan and had issue i) Caroline-Hogarth born August 22, 1881 died March 22, 1882.  3) Cyrus-Sanderson, born September 30, 1852 died December 14, 1854.

THE SHIEL or SHIELDS FAMILY.
(This exert may be folklore, there is no proven evidence behind the following)
THE Shiel or Shields family is descended from Milesius, King of Spain, through the line of his son Heremon. The founder .of the family was Maine, ancestor of the Southern Hy Mais, and son of Nial of the Nine Hostages, King of Ireland, A. D. 379. The ancient name was Sibhealt, meaning  “The Gracious,” and was taken from a chief named Siaghail. The possessions of the sept were located in the present Counties of Westmeath and Antrim. The name is of great antiquity, and was Latinized at a very early date in the form Sedulius. Under the Celtic pentarchy the O’Shiels or Shields were the standard bearers of the north, an office of special honor and trust in those military times. One of the most noted of this name was Richard Lalor Shiel, author, politician and orator, and the ” twin ” emancipator, who was O’Connell’s chief supporter in the struggle for Catholic emancipation. He was born in Waterford in 1791. In early life he produced several plays of merit, the best known of which are ” Evadne ” and ” The Apostate.” His labor in the cause of Catholic emancipation was brilliant and successful, and his devotion to his country’s interests was sincere. As an orator he had few equals in his day, and his ” Sketches of the Irish Bar” will always remain the best source for information concerning the leading liar celebrities of the time in Ireland. He died in 1852. Of (his family also was the late General James Shields of the United States. He was a native of the historic town of  Dunngannon, and came to America al an early ago. He served as Second Lieutenant of Volunteers in the Florida War before the age of twenty, and on the outbreak of the .Mexican War he was appointed a Brigadier-General he contributed hugely to the victory of Cerro Gordo, and elicited the praise of General Scott and his brother officers. Near the close of the engagement General Shields was shot through the lungs, the ball passing completely through his body. At Contreras and the Hacienda de los Partales he subsequently distinguished himself, and at the assault upon Chapultepec, though severely wounded, he refused to leave his command or quit the field. General Shields served also in the late Civil War and won the distinction of being the only man who ever defeated ” Stonewall ” Jackson. In civil and political life General Shields likewise gained high honors. He was the only man who ever represented, at different times, three states in the United States Senate. There are many of this name in the United States.

Early American Immigration and New World Settlers
Shields Settlers in the United States
James Shields was transported to Virginia in 1666
John Shields was a runaway servant in Maryland during 1770
Martin Shields from Ireland emigrated to Maryland in 1774

Shields Settlers in Canada in the 18th & 19th Century
Mr. David Shields U.E. who settled in St. Andrews, Charlotte County, New Brunswick c. 1784
Mr. John Shields U.E. who settled in St. Andrews, Charlotte County, New Brunswick c. 1784
Patrick Shields, aged 20, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship “Nancy” in 1834
William Shields who migrated from Edinburgh was keeper of Cape Spear Lighthouse, Newfoundland and died in 1836
Mr. Edward Shields, aged 2 who emigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship “Rose” departing from the port of Liverpool, England but died on Grosse Isle in July 1847
Mr. William Shields, aged 1 year & 6 months who emigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship “Constitution” departing from the port of Belfast, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle on 28th May 1847
Mr. William Shields, aged 2 who emigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship “Maria Somes” departing from the port of Cork, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle in September 1847

Shields Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
John Shields, a carpenter, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
John Shields, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Louisa Baillie” in 1849
Archibald Shields, aged 22, who arrived in South Australia in 1850 aboard the ship “Agincourt”
Catherine Shields, English convict from Lancaster, who was transported aboard the “Anna Maria” on October 4, 1851, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia
Rosanna Shields, aged 22, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Agincourt”

Shields Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
Thomas Shields, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Agra” in 1852
William Shields, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Cairngorm” in 1863
Euphemia Shields, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Cairngorm” in 1863
Patrick Shields, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Triumph” in 1883
Catherine Shields, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Triumph” in 1883

Mottoes
Be trulist. Be faithful.
Death Before Dishonor

Grantees
SHIELDS, Sir Douglas Andrew, Kt. Bach. (1919) ; hon LL D (St. Andrews), F.R.C.S. (A.) ; M.D. (Melbourne, 1901) ; Cons. Surg. R.N. (Rear Adm.) ; was Surg.-in-Ch. Aust. Hosp., B.E.F., organized and equipped Hosps. during World War I ; b. 21 July, 1877, son of late Andrews Shields, of Melbourne, M.D. (Edin.), m. Dec. 1900, Mary Ellen, dau. of Capt. W. Shirrefs, and has issue : Douglas Clive, B.M., B.Ch., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. Addresses—8, Upper Wimpole Street, W.l ; “ Oakley,” Merstham, Surrey.
SHIELS, Sir (Thomas) Drummond, Kt. Bach. (1939), M.C • educ  Board Sch. and Edin. Univ. (M.B., Ch.B.) ; Public Relations Offr., G.P.O. from 1946 ; Fell., formerly Snr. Pres. Royal Med. Soc; formerly mem. Edinburgh Town Council ; M.P. for E. Edin. 1924-31 ; Pari. Under-Sec. Of State for India 1929, and for Colonies 1929-31 ; mem. Donoughmore Commn. on Ceylon Constitution 1928 ; mem. Colonial Econ. and Development Council ; Vice-Pres. and Chm. Information Cttee. Royal Empire Soc. ; Vice-Pres. Royal African Soc. ; mem. Gov. Body, Brit. Post-graduate Med. Fedn. ; Chm. Cttee. of Management, Post-graduate Med. Sch. of Lond. ; mem. Empire Med. Adv. Bureau (B.M.A.) ; Actg. Sec. Empire Pari. Assocn. 1940-46 ; served in World War I with Royal Scots (despatches) ; Belgian Croix de Guerre ; b. 7 Aug. 1881, son of James Drummond Shiels, of Edinburgh, m. 1904, Christian Blair (d. 21 July, 1948), dau. Of Alexander Young, of Gilmerton, Edinburgh, and has issue : one dau.

Notables
Benjamin Glover Shields (b. 1808), American politician, Member of Alabama State House of Representatives, 1834; U.S. Representative from Alabama at-large, 1841-43; U.S. Charge d’Affaires to Venezuela, 1845
Brooke Christa Shields (b. 1965), American actress, author and model
Brooke Shields (born 1965), American actress, author and model
Carol Shields (1935–2003), American author
Carol Shields (ophthalmologist) (born 1957), American doctor
Charles A. Shields, American fighter pilot and flying ace in the U.S. Navy, during World War II, credited with 5 aerial victories
Christa Brooke Camille Shields (b. 1965), American actress and former fashion model better known as Brooke Shields
Clayton Shields (born 1976), American basketball player
Eileen Shields (born 1970), American footwear designer
Francis Alexander Shields (1941-2003), American Republican, executive at Revlon, best known as the father of the actress Brooke Shields
Francis Alexander Shields (1941–2003), Brooke Shields’ father
Francis Xavier “Frank” Shields (1909-1975), famous amateur American tennis player
Frank Shields (1909–1975), American tennis player and actor
Harry Shields (1899–1971), American dixieland jazz musician
Jake Shields (born 1979), American mixed martial arts fighter
James Shields (1810-1879), American politician and U.S. Army officer
James Shields (baseball) (born 1981), American baseball player
James Shields (politician, born 1762) (1762–1831), American congressman from Ohio
James Shields (politician, born 1810) (1810–1879), American politician and U.S. Army officer
Jimi Shields (active since 1991), Irish musician
Kevin Shields (born 1963), Irish musician
Larry Shields (1893–1953), American dixieland jazz clarinetist
Mark Shields (born 1937), American political pundit
Mark Shields (police commissioner) (born 1959), Jamaica’s Deputy Police Commissioner
Mick Shields (1912–1983), Australian rugby league footballer
Nicki Shields, British television presenter
Pete Shields (1891–1961), American baseball player
Sam Shields (born 1987), American football player
Scot Shields (born 1975), American baseball player
Steve Shields (baseball) (born 1958), American baseball player
Steve Shields (basketball coach) (born 1965), American basketball coach
Steve Shields (ice hockey) (born 1972), Canadian ice hockey player
Teri Shields (1933–2012), Brooke Shields’ mother
Teri Shields (b. 1933), American actress, film producer, socialite and mother of actress Brooke Shields
Thomas Todhunter Shields (1873–1955), Canadian religious leader
Tyler Shields (born 1982), American photographer
Will Shields (born 1971), American football player
Willow Shields (born 2000), American actress

American Revolution Veterans
Andw Shields, Pennsylvania, Rank of Private
Barnard Shields, Pennsylvania, Rank of Sergeant
Barney Shields, Pennsylvania, Rank of Sergeant
Charles Shields, Virginia, Rank of Private
Dickinson Shields, Pennsylvania, Rank of Private
Frans Shields, Virginia, Rank of Private
James Shields, New York, Rank of Private
Jas Shields, Virginia, Rank of Private
Jno Shields, Pennsylvania, Rank of Private
John Shields, Virginia, Rank of Drum and Fife
Michael Shields, Pennsylvania, Rank of Private
Richard Shields, Rhode Island, Rank of Private
Robert Shields, Connecticut, Rank of Private
William Shields, North Carolina, Rank of Foot Seldiver
Wm Shields, New Jersey, Rank of Private
Wm Shields, Pennsylvania, Rank of Private

Civil War Veterans
Aaron Shields, 7th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Able Shields, 67th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Abraham Shields, 8th Regiment, Ohio Cavalry, Union, Ohio
Abram Shields, 64th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Absolam Shields, 50th Regiment, Ilinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Adam Shields, 74th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Addington Shields, 1st Regiment, United States Colored Cavalry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Adolphus Shields, 3rd Regiment, Indiana Cavalry, Union, Indiana
Adrian Shields, 47th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Albert Shields, Brooks Battalion Confederate Regular Infantry, Confederate, Confederate Troops
Alexander Shields, 169th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Alfred Shields, 2nd Regiment, Georgia Reserves, Confederate, Georgia
Allen Shields, 26th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Allison Shields, 11th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Amaziah Shields, 132nd Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Ambrose Shields, 123rd Regiment, Unied States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Amos Shields, Signal Corps, US Volunteers, Union, Union Volunteers
Andrew Shields, 2nd Regiment, New Jersey Cavalry, Union, New Jersey
Anthony Shields, 2nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Cavalry, Union, Pennsylvania
Aratus Shields, 4th Regiment, Mississippi Cavalry, Confederate, Mississippi
Archabald Shields, 66th Regiment, Indiana Cavalry, Union Indiana
Arnett Shields, 29th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Arthur Shields, 140th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Asa Shields, 115th Regiment, Virginia Militia, Confederate, Virginia
Ashbel Shields, 1st Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry, Confederate, North Carolina
August Shields, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Army of the Frontier, Union, Union Volunteers
Augustus Shields, 61st Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Confederate, Georgia
Barney Shields, 1st Regiment, New York Engineers, Union, New York
Barron Shields, 39th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Basil Shields, 25th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Bassel Shields, 2nd Regiment, Mississippi Infantry, Confederate, Mississippi
Benjamin Shields, Webster County Regiment Missouri Home Guard, Union, Missouri
Bernard Shields, 93rd Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Beverly Shields, 1st Regiment, Wisconsin Heavy Artillery, Union, Wisconsin
Bisland Shields, Jeff Davis Legion, Mississippi Cavalry, Confederate, Mississippi
Bryan Shields, 1st Regiment, Washington Infantry, Union, Washington Territory
Bryant Shields, Mallett’s Battalion, North Carolina Camp Guards, Confederate, North Carolina
Burr Shields, 51st Regiment, Alabama Partisan Rangers, Confederate, Alabama
Cadwalader Shields, 49th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Cas Shields, 2nd Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate, Tennessee
Chapman Shields, 9th Regiment, Alabama Cavalry, Confederate, Alabama
Charles Shields, 2nd Regiment, California Cavalry, Union, California
Christopher Shields, 28th Regiment, Michigan Infantry, Union, Michigan
Clarence Shields, 159th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Clark Shields, 206th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Clarkson Shields, 147th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Conrad Shields, 1st Regiment, Minnesota Heavy Artillery, Union, Minnesota
Cornelius Shields, 78th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Cowan Shields, 56th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Cyrus Shields, 16th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Daniel Shields, Purnell Legion, Maryland Infantry, Union, Maryland
David Shields, 48th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Dennis Shields, 14th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery, Union, New York
Doctor Shields, 3rd Regiment, Virginia Cavalry, Confederate, Virginia
Dudley Shields, 123rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Ebenezer Shields, 8th Regiment, Indiana Cavalry, Union, Indiana
Edmon Shields, 31st Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Edmund Shields, 30th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Edward Shields, 2nd Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate, Florida
Edwin Shields, 12th Regiment, Kansas Infantry, Union, Kansas
Eli Shields, 13th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Elijah Shields, 51st Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Elutherus Shields, 169th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Ely Shields, 170th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Emery Shields, 136th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Enos Shields, 29th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Farrell Shields, 20th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry, Union, Massachusetts
Felix Shields, 95th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Francis Shields, Walsh’s Company, Missouri Light Artillery, Confederate, Missouri
Frank Shields, 4th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry, Union, New Jersey
Frederick Shields, 5th Regiment, United States Colored Heavy Artillery, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
George Shields, Desha County Battalion, Arkansas Militia, Confederate, Arkansas
Granville Shields, 4th Regiment, Kentucky Mounted Infantry, Union, Kentucky
Green Shields, 18th Regiment, US Infantry, Union, Union Regular Army
Greenberry Shields, 17th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Greene Shields, 18th Regiment, US Infantry, Union, Union Regular Army
Harrison Shields, 70th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Harry Shields, 5th Regiment, New York Veteran Infantry, Union, New York
Henry Shields, 28th Regiment, Louisiana Infantry, Confederate, Louisiana
Hiram Shields, 38th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Confederate, Georgia
Homer Shields, 105th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Hugh Shields, 5th Regiment, Connecticut Infantry, Union, Connecticut
Ira Shields, 92nd Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Isaac Shields, 1st Regiment, Maine Cavalry, Union, maine
Isaiah Shields, 5th Regiment, Texas Infantry, Confederate, Texas
Ishmael Shields, 10th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Jackson Shields, 53rd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Jacob Shields, 14th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
James Shields, 3rd Regiment, California Infantry, Union, California
Jefferson Shields, 27th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate, Alabama
Jeptha Shields, Missouri State Guard, Confederate, Missouri
Jeremiah Shields, 25th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry, Union, Massachusetts
Jerry Shields, 1st Confederate Battalion, Georgia Infantry, Confederate, Georgia
Jesse Shields, 2nd Regiment, New York Veteran Cavalry, Union, New York
Jim Shields, 34th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Job Shields, 5th Regiment, Mississippi Cavalry, Confederate, Mississippi
Joel Shields, 9th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Union, Kentucky
John Shields, 5th Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate, Florida
Johnson Shields, Gordon’s Regiment, Arkansas Cavalry, Confederate, Arkansas
Joseph Shields, 8th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, Union, Illinois
Joshua Shields, 4th Regiment, veteran Reserve Corps, Union, Veteran Reserve Corps
Josiah Shields, 80th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Kinzey Shields, 3rd Regiment, Illinois, Union, Illinois
Lafayette Shields, Perkins’ Battalion, Missouri Infantry, Confederate, Missouri
Larkin Shields, 2nd Regiment, Kansas Infantry, Union, Kansas
Laurence Shields, 37th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Lawrence Shields, 42nd Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry, Union, Massachusetts
Leander shields, 32nd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Lee Shields, 32nd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Lemuel Shields, 4th Regiment, Iowa Infantry, Union, Iowa
Leonard Shields, Washinton Battalion Louisiana Artillery, Confederate, Louisiana
Levi Shields, 113th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Lewis Shields, 31st Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Linard Shields, 18th Regiment, US Infantry, Union, Union Regular Army
Louis Shields, 13th Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry, Union, Wisconsin
Madison Shields, 96th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Mark Shields, 5th Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, Union, Veteran Reserve Corps
Marshal Shields, 1st Battalion, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Martin Shields, 15th Regiment, West Virginia Infantry, Union, West Virginia
Matthew Shields, 69th Regiment, New York State Militia, Union, New York
Maurice Shields, 3rd Regimetn, Veteran Reserve corps, Union, Veteran Reserve Corps
Mev. Shields, 21st Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate, Tennessee
Michael Shields, 11th Regiment, Michigan Cavalry, Union, Michigan
Milton Shields, 17th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate, Alabama
Moses Shields, 12th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, Union, Illinois
Nathan Shields, 53rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Nathaniel Shields, Motley’s Company, Virginia Light Artillery, Confederate, Virginia
Neil Shields, 3rd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Nelson Shields, 108th Regiment, Unied States Colored Infantry Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Nero Shields, 10th Regiment, United States Colored Heavy Artillery, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Nicholas Shields, 1st Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, Union, Massachusetts
Oscar Shields, 2nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Cavalry, Union, Pennsylvania
Owen Shields, 2nd Battalion, Maryland Infantry, Confederate, Maryland
Pales Shields, 48th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Palestine Shields, 54th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Parker Shields, 3rd Regiment, Mississippi Infantry, Confederate, Mississippi
Pat Shields, 8th Battalion, Confederate Infantry, Confederate, Confederate Troops
Patrick Shields, 48th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Patterson Shields, 148th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Perry Shields, 62nd Regiment, Virginia Mounted Infantry, Confederate, Virginia
Peter Shields, 9th Regiment, Connecticut Infantry, Union, Connecticut
Peyton Shields, 31st Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Philip Shields, 5th Regiment, Massachusetts Cavalry, Union, Massachusetts
Pleasant Shields, 97th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Ranell Shields, 20th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry, Union, Massachusetts
Redington Shields, 9th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry, Union, Kansas
Reuben Shields, 102nd Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Richard Shields, 26th Regiment, Iowa Infantry, Union, Iowa
Robert Shields, Florida Militia, Confederate, Florida
Sampson Shields, 60th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Samuel Shields, 9th Regiment, Louisiana Infantry, Confederate, Louisiana
Sandy Shields, 71st Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Sextus Sheilds, 31st Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry, Union, Massachusetts
Shepherd Shields, 58th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Silas Shields, 18th Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Union, Missouri
Simeon Shields, 146th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Solomon Shields, 7th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Stephen Shields, 1st Regiment, Georgia Regulars, confederate, Georgia
Stewart Shields, 9th Battalion, Virginia Infantry, Confederate, Virginia
Sylvester Shields, 144th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Terence Shields, 3rd Regiment, New York Light Artillery, Union, New York
Theodore Shields, 3rd Regiment, Ohio Cavalry, Union, Ohio
Thomas Shields, Ahl’s Battery, Delaware Heavy Artillery, Union, Delaware
Tilghman Shields, 93rd Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Timothy Shields, 7th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry, Union, Massachusetts
Tom Shields, 2nd Regiment, United States Colored Cavalry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Vincent Shields, 9th Regiment, Kentucky Mounted Infantry, Confederate, Kentucky
Walter Shields, 99th Regiment, New York Infantry National Guard, Union, New York
Warren Shields, 4th Regiment, Kentucky Mounted Infantry, Union, Kentucky
Washington Shields, 85th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Watson Shields, 52nd Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Wedlin Shields, 48th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Wesley Shields, 13th Regiment, Indiana Cavalry, Union, Indiana
William Shields, 6th Regiment, Delaware Infantry, Union, Delaware
Wilson Shields, 28th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Winfield Shield, 1st Regiment, Pennsylvania Light Artillery, Union, Pennsylvania
Wyatt Shields, 2nd Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Zachariah Shields, 5th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Union, Kentucky

Shields Coat of Arms Meaning

See glossary for symbol meaning.

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