Sim Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Sim Family Coat of Arms

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Sim Coat of Arms Meaning

Sim Name Origin & History

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Sim Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Sim blazon are the moor’s head, mullet and boar. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The head of a Moor is frequently borne on the arms of those at one time involved with crusades, possibly associated with some “deeds of prowess”. 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P93 The head is shown typically in a realistic fashion but the precise details are left to the imagination and skills of the artist! 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Head

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Sim Name

Sim Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Sim:

According to the early recordings of the spellings this surname contains such differentiations such as Sim, Sims, Simms, Simes, Symms, Simis, and Symes. It is an ancient English surname. It evolves from the provided name “Simme”, a later style of the particular Greek name “Simon”, itself eventually from the Hebrew name “Shimeon” which mean “he who hears.” In English form of the Old confirmation, the specific name arises both as Shimeon and Simeon, but in the New confirmation, it takes the style as Simon. The surname is a progressive invention. So, it is to say it is one of a batch of biblical or religious names which were brought back to Europe in the 12th century by the coming back of religious persons from the Holy Land, known as the Crusaders. It became the habit of these returning soldiers to call their next children by religious names, in the dignity of the father’s actions. This habit spread very quickly causing the elimination of many old names of Europe, and ultimately these new introduction names in time also changed into surnames.

Variations:

More common variations are: Sime, Simm, Simo, Sima, Saim, Sium, Simi, Simu, Siem, Seim.

England:

The origins of the surname Sim were first found in East Lothian where people held a family seat from early times.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ralph Simme who arises in the Assize Court rolls of the division of Kent, dated about 1234. And that of John Symme in the court rolls of the imported of Colchester in the year 1345. Where it occurs the final “s” is a shortened form of “son of”. Early examples contain Robert Symmes in the Poll Tax rolls of Yorkshire in the year 1379, and Christopher Sims of Berkshire registered in the records of the University of Oxford for 1594. Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Sim had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

People with the surname Sim settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the surname Sim who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Alexander Sim landed in Maryland in the year 1674.

Some of the people with the surname Sim who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Geo Christ Sim arrived in Pennsylvania in 1749. Jane Sim landed in North Caroline and John Sim in New York in the sim year 1774.

The following century saw more Sim surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Sim who settled in the United States in the 19th century included George landed in Allegany Division, Pennsylvania in the year 1845.

Canada:

People with the surname Sim settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in the 18th and 19th. Some of the individuals with the surname Sim who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Robert Sim in Nova Scotia in the year 1773.

The following century saw more Sim surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Sim who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Thomas Sim, William Sim, and Peter, Sim Jr. Landed in Canada in the same year 1830.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Sim who settled in Australia in the 19th century included James Sim who was a laborer at the age of 30, Ellen Sim at the age of 26 and Jane Sim who was also a servant at the age of 31 years arrived in South Australia in the same year 1851, aboard the ships “Reliance and Oregon”. Charles Sim and Elizabeth Sim at the age of 39 and 31 and who were servants arrived in South Australia in the same year 1854 aboard the same ship “John Bunyan”.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Sim who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Sim and Hughina Sim arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the same ship “ Blue Jacket” in the same year 1865. Margaret Sim who at the age of 26 and Jane Sim at the age of 24 arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the same ship “Constance” in the same year 1862.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Sim: United States 6,765; England 4,227; South Korea 72,120; Phillippines 9,860; Vietnam 10,135; Singapore 29,895; China 97, 935; Cambodia 66,250; Uzbekistan 7,565; Malaysia 59,544.

Notable People:

Alastair Sim (1900–1976), was a Scottish artist.

Chea Sim (born 1932), is a Chinese-Cambodian man of politics.

Dave Sim (born 1956), is a Canadian writer.

Jon Sim (born 1977), is a Canadian player in ice hockey.

Sheila Sim (1922–2016), was an English film artist.

Thomas Robertson Sim (1858–1938), was a South African biologist.

Sim Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Coombe Wood, co. Surrey, from Aberdeen, 1858). Motto—Quod verum tutum. Gules on a chevron argent between two mullets pierced or, and a halbert in base of the last, a boar's head erased between two hands issuing from the dexter and sinister sides of the shield, each holding a dagger proper. Crest—A Moor's head proper banded argent.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P93
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Head
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67