Simpson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Simpson Family Coat of Arms

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Simpson Coat of Arms Meaning

Simpson Name Origin & History

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Simpson Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Simpson blazon are the vert, ermine spot, leopard and lion rampant. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and gules .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? Nevertheless, real animals 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 are perhaps one of the most common sights on coats of arms, especially animals of European origin. The leopard Is a typical example of these.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Simpson Name

Simpson Origin:

Scotland, England

Origins of Simpson:

The surname of Simpson has two possible origins from which it could have derived. The first origin of the surname of Simpson hails from the country of Greece, and was later introduced into the country of England. The patronymic surname is said to be a form of the medieval personal given name of “Simme” which was said to have derived itself from the Old Greek personal given name of “Simon.” This personal given name would have been introduced to the country of England following the Crusades. The surname of Simpson, and its derivative of the personal given name of Simme possibly derived from the Pre 7th Century Old English personal given name of Sigmund. The second possible origin of the surname of Simpson hails from the country of England. It is believed that the surname of Simpson may have been a locational surname for the places in Buckinghamshire and Devonshire. Since the surname of Simpson is possibly regarded as locational, this means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. The names of these places from which the surname of Simpson possibly was derived were named as “Swinestone” in the Doomsday Book of 1086 (which covered the “Great Survey of England) which can be translated to mean “a settlement” and also included the given name of “Sigewine,” which it was believed to later be called Simpson.

Variations:

More common variations are: Simson, Simpsone, Sims, Simpsony, Simms, Simposon, Simes, Simpsonn, Sim, Simipson

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Simpson hails from the country of England. One person who was named as Richard Symmeson, who was mentioned as a witness within the Assize Court of Staffordshire in the year of 1353. This court document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward III of England, who was commonly referred to throughout the ages as one “The Father of the English Navy.” King Edward III of England ruled from the year 1327 to the year 1377. Those who bear the surname of Simpson can be found in the areas of Yorkshire and Lancashire counties.

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Simpson within the country of Scotland was in the year of 1405. One person by the name of William Symsoun was named in the Edinburgh Press Rolls. In the year of 1482, one Wylzame Symptsun was mentioned as being innocent to the accused crime of holding King James III of Scotland within Edinburgh Castle. Those who carry the surname of Simpson within the country of Scotland can be found in the areas of Aberdeenshire and Fife counties.

United States of America:

Within the United States, there are many people who bear the surname of Simpson. Those people can be found in New York, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Kentucky, Illinois, Ohio, and North Carolina.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Simpson: United States 175,689; England 55,405; Australia 25,481; Canada 23,744; South Africa 17,077; Scotland 10,658; Jamaica 8,781; Ghana 8,068; New Zealand; 5,614; Nigeria 5,044

Notable People:

James “Jim” Shores Simpson (1927-2016) who was a sportscaster from America whose notable achievements include being awarded the Sports Achievement Award and being inducted into the Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association Hall of Fame in the year 2000

Joseph “Red” Simpson (1934-2016) who was a country music singer and songwriter from America

Zadock F. Simpson, who was a Democratic politician from America, and who served as the Postmaster at Follansbee, West Virginia in the year 1918

William Walton Simson who was a Democratic politician from America and was also a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the District of Columbia for the year 1968 and 1972

William T. Simpson who was a Republican politician from American and who served as a Member of the New York State Assembly from Kings Country in the 12th District from the year 1914 to the year 1917 and the year 1920, also served as a Member of the New York State Senate in the 6th District from the year 1921 to the year 1922

William T. Simpson who was a politician from America and also the U.S. Collector of Customs from the year 1979 to the year 1981

Simpson Family Gift Ideas

Browse Simpson family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Buckingham). Vert on a fess or, betw. three crescents in chief and a leopard pass. guard. cowarded in base ar. four erm. spots sa. Crest—Out of a tower a demi lion ramp. holding in both paws a scymitar all ppr.
2) (Bradley, co. Durham). Gu. a fess betw. two lions or.
3) (Glover’s House, Sittingbourne, co. Kent). Motto—Nunquam obliviscar. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, per bend sinister dancettee erminois and sa. a lion ramp. counterchanged, on a canton gu. a covered cup ar.; 2nd, erm. a chev. gu. betw. three pheasant cocks’ heads couped az.; 3rd, ar. on a fess dancettee gu. betw. three torteaux a fleur-de-lis or. Crest—An ounce’s head pean erased gu. gorged with a collar gemel ar.
4) (Fulham, co. Middlesex, and Vauxhall, co. Surrey). Per fess gu. and or, a pale counterchanged, three birds of the second. Crest—A lion ramp. or.
5) (granted to Edward Simpson, Esq., of Lichfield). Per bend sinister or and sa. a lion ramp. counterchanged, holding betw. the paws a gauntlet az. Crest—An ounce's head ppr. erased and ducally crowned gu. charged on the neck with a gauntlet or.
6) (Foston Hall, co. York). (Stamford, co. Lincoln). Motto—Nil sine labore. (Mellor Lodge, co. Derby). Per bend nebulee or and sa. a lion ramp. counterchanged. Crest—Out of a mural coronet ar. a demi lion ramp. guard. per pale or and sa. holding in the dexter paw a sword erect ppr.
7) (Westhouse, co. Durham). Motto—Perseveranti dabitur. Gu. a fess betw. two lions or. Crest—A naked arm holding a wreath of laurel all ppr.
8) (co. York). Per bend or and sa. a lion ramp. counterchanged. Crest—Out a tower az. a demi lion ramp. guard. per pale or and sa. holding in the dexter paw a sword ar. hilt and pommel gold.
9) Per pale erm. and gu. three roundles counterchanged. Crest—A snake nowed vert.
10) Ar. three mullets sa.
11) Per bend sinister gu. and or, a lion ramp. counterchanged, on a chief wavy ar. a cross raguly couped of the first. Crest—A cross, as in the arpis, suspended therefrom an escutcheon per bend sinister ar. and or, charged with a lion ramp. az. Motto—Regni regnoque fidelis.
12) (Castle Lodge, co. York). Motto—Nil desperandum. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, per bend or and sa. a lion ramp. counterchanged, for Simpson; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a cross engr. sa. betw. four torteaux. Crest—A demi lion ramp. or.
13) (London). Motto—Je suis pret. Ar. a lion pass. guard. gu. on a chief vert a rose betw. two crescents of the field. Crest—An eagle’s head erased ppr.
14) (Gen. Sir James Simpson, G.C.B., 1856). Motto—Profunda cernit. Ar. a crane holding in the dexter foot a stone ppr. on a chief vert three crescents of the first. Crest—An eagle’s head erased ppr.
15) (Strathavon, co. Linlithgow, bart., 1866). Motto (over the crest)—Victo dolore. Or, on a chief vert a goshawk betw. two crescents ar. Crest—A staff erect cncircled by a serpent or.
16) (Udoch, Scotland, 1672). Ar. on a chief vert three crescents of the first. Crest—A falcon volant ppr. Motto—Alis nutrior.
17) (Thorntoun, Scotland, 16S0). The same, the chief indented. Crest—A crescent or. Motto—Tandem implebitur.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191