Singleton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Singleton Family Coat of Arms

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Singleton Coat of Arms Meaning

Singleton Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Shingleton.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Singleton. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.
singleton coat of arms

Singleton Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Singleton blazon are the chevronel, martlet, lion rampant and pellet. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, gules and argent .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Readers may already be aware of the chevron, the large inverted ‘V’ shape that extends across the whole shield but may be new to its smaller cousin the chevronel. This can equally cover the whole width but is at least half the width of the chevron, if not narrower. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevronel There can be multiple chevronels present, normally these are stacked vertically, but there is a very striking variant whereby the chevronels are said to be interlaced, in which case they are side-by-side, overlapping and intertwined, creating a very striking effect 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P124. In common with its larger relative, Wade associates the chevronel with the idea of “Protection…and a reward to one who has achieved a notable enterprise” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

Singleton Family Gift Ideas

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Singleton Name

Singleton Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The Singleton surname derives from geographical locations in England, specifically Kirkham in Lancashire and Singleton in Sussex. The Lacnashire Singleton surname is a combination of the Old English words scingel (shingle) + tun (enclosure). The Sussex Singleton surname is a combination of the Old English words sengel (burnt clearning) + tun. The former complete description in Old English would be “a settlement on shingly soil”, the latter complete description in Old English would be “the settlement in the burnt clearing”.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Singgleton, Singletone, Sinngleton, Saingleton, Singletonn, Singletown, Singleeton, Singletyon, Sihngleton, Shingleton, Singleturn

History:

England:

A surname with a geographical origin was usually used to easily identify the origin of someone. A local landowner, medieval lord, or those who leased land from the lord could be best identified by their birthplace. Most likely, these people would move to another area in search of work.

England began to introduce a personal tax on citizens and would begin to record surnames to keep track of who had paid their taxes. The first known recording of this name by the English treasury is that of Ughtred de Sinleton in 1190, a landowner from Amounderness, Lancashire. All Singleton surnames from Lancashire are descended from this first known recording of the name.

John Singleton in 1635 would leave London aboard the ship “Thomas and John” for the New World and settle in Virginia.

Singleton is the 483rd most common name in Great Britain. The highest concentrations are in Cheshire, Nottinghamshire, and North Yorkshire.

Scotland:

Although not very common in Scotland, families with the surname Singleton primarily lived in Lanarkshire and Ayrshire.

America:

The largest population of the surname Singleton can be found in southern states, with the majority in Georgia and South Carolina.

Singleton Today:

57,000 in the United States

8,000 in England

2,500 in Australia

Notable People:

Mark Singleton (actor) (1919–1986), British actor

Penny Singleton (actress) 1908 – 2003)

John Singleton (entrepreneur) (1941)

John Singleton (director) (1968)

Singleton Family Gift Ideas

Browse Singleton family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Singleton Hall, co. Lancaster). Gu. three chevronels betw. as many martlets ar. Crest—A demi antelope sa. platée, crined and attired ar. pierced through the chest with a broken spear or, vulned guttée de sang. Another Crest—An arm embowed in armour ppr. grasping a sceptre or, on the top an estoile gold.
2) (Broughton, co. Lancaster, Dykelborough and Mendlesham, co. Norfolk, and co. Cornwall). Ar. three chevronels gu. betw. as many martlets sa. Same Crest as the last.
3) (co. Essex, temp. Edward III.). Or, three chev. gu. over all a lion ramp, of the last.
4) (Brockhall, co. Lancaster). Ar. a chev. betw. three pellets sa.
5) (Steyning, co. Lancaster, 1664). Ar. three chevronels gu. betw. as many martlets sa.
6) (co. Lancaster). Ar. three chev. gu.
7) (co. York). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three pellets. Crest—A camel pass. erm. bridled or.
8) (Reg. Ulster's Office, as the arms of Henry Singleton, Prime Serjeant-at-law 1726, afterwards Master of the Rolls and Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas in Ireland, now extinct in the male line). Ar. three chevronels gu. betw. as many martlets sa. Crest—An armed arm holding in the hand ppr. a murdering staff or.
9) (Aclare, co. Meath; exemplified to Francis Corbet, Esq., of Aclare, on his assuming, by royal licence, 1820, the surname of Singleton, in lieu of Corbet, in compliance with the will of Right II on. Lord chief Justice Henry Singleton). Motto—Bona fide sine fraude. Quarterly, 1 st and 4th, ar. three chevronels gu. betw. as many martlets sa., for Singleton; 2nd and 3rd, or, a raven close ppr., for Corbet. Crests—1st: An arm embowed in armour ppr. grasping a sccptre terminated by an estoile or; 2nd: An elephant ar. armed or, on his back a tower also ar. trappings gu. garnished gold.
10) (Fort Singleton, co. Monaghan; exemplified to Thomas Crawford, Esq., of Fort Singleton, on his assuming, by royal licence, 1843, the surname and arms of Singleton, in compliance with the desire of his maternal grandfather, Thomas Singleton, Esq., of Fort Singleton). Motto—Mutare sperno. Ar. three chevronels gu. betw. as many martlets sa. a trefoil for diff. Crest—A demi antelope sa. platee, crined and attired ar. pierced through the chest with a broken spear or, vulned guttée do sang.
11) Ar. three chevronels gu. betw. six martlets sa. three in chief and three in base, two and one.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevronel
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P124
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141