Skipwith Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Skipwith Family Coat of Arms

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Skipwith Coat of Arms Meaning

Skipwith Name Origin & History

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skipwith coat of arms

Skipwith Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Skipwith blazon are the bar, greyhound and turnstile. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and argent .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

Architectural items, from individual components to entire buildings 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92 feature frequently as charges In a coat of arms. Not surprisingly, considering the times from which many arms date, fortifications are common. The turnstile Is a typical example of an object from the world of architecture adopted, albeit in a stylised form, for use in heraldry.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Skipwith Name

Origins of Skipwith:
Skipwith is an old Norman name that arrived in England after the Norman Invasion of 1066.  The Skipwith family resided in Yorkshire, at Skipwith, a hamlet and civil church about 4 miles (6.4 km) northeast of Selby.  Skipwith Hall was built in the early 1700’s and remains today as “a handsome mansion.”  The place name means “sheep farm, from the Old English words “scip” and “Wic” and first noted as Schipewic in the Domesday Book of 1086.  Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names.  Most of these names developed in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their Norman French language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court, were French and Latin. To make matters worse, old authors spelt words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they noted.  The name spelt Skipwith, Skipworth, Shipwith, Shipworth and much more.

Variations:
More common variations are: Skippeth, Skepweth.

England:
The surname Skipwith first appeared in Yorkshire where they held a family seat at Skipwith, where Robert of Estoteville, (sometimes called ‘Stuteville’,) the founder of the Skipwiths, Baron of Cottingham, given his lands by William, Duke of Normandy, after his Conquest of England in 1066 A.D.  This family was one of the most important in all Normandy and held the Castle at Ambrieres.  They were very close both to King Henry, and his brother Duke Robert of Normandy.  The Baron became King of the Estate of Skipwith.  The first to think the name Skipwith was Patrick de Skipwith, the second son of the Baron.  “Snore Hall [in the church of Fordham in Norfolk], now a farmhouse, was the seat of the family of Skipwith, who entertained Charles I. on the night previous to his giving himself to the Scottish army. ”

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Skipwith landed in the United States in four different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th.    Some of the people with the name Skipwith who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Sir Grey Skipwith, who landed in Virginia in the year 1672. People with the surname Skipwith who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Peter Skipwith, great grandson of Sir William Skipwith who settled in Virginia in the year 1789. People with the surname Skipwith who landed in the United States in the 19th century included I. A. Skipwith at the age of 42, who settled in America, in the year 1897. The following century saw more Skipwith surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Skipwith who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Mrs. E. G. Skipwith, who emigrated to the United States, in the year 1904.  Greg. Skipwith at the age of 27, who moved to the United States, in the same year 1904.  Edward Skipwith at the age of 31, who settled in America from London, England, in the year 1908.  Bertha Sylvia Skipwith at the age of 42, who landed in America from London, England, in 1920.  Berta Silvia Skipwith at the age of 43, who moved to the United States from Bedford, England, in the year 1922.

Skipwith Family Gift Ideas

Browse Skipwith family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Skipworth, co. York; descended from Robert de Estoville, Baron of Cottingham, temp. William I.; his grandson, Patrick de Estoteville, having the lordship of Skipwith by gift of his father, assumed that surname). Ar. three bars gu. a greyhound in full course in chief sa. collared or.
2) (Ormesby, co. Lincoln, and Newbold Hall, co. Warwick, bart., extinct 1790; Sir Fulwar Skipwith, Bart., of Newbold Hall, descended from Sir Richard Skipwith, Knt., eldest son of Sir William Skipwith, Knt., of Ormesby, temp. Edward VI., was so created 1670; the seventh bart. d. s. p.). Motto—Sans Dieu je ne puis. (Methringham, co. Lincoln, bart., extinct 1756; Sir Thomas Skipwith, Bart., of Metheringham, descended from Edward Skipwith, second son of Sir William Skipwith, Knt., of Ormesby, temp. Edward VI., was so created 1678; the third bart. d. s. p.). (Prestwould, co. Leicester, bart.; Sir Henry Skipwith. Bart., of Prestwould, descended from Henry Skipwith, younger brother of Sir William Skipwith, Knt., of Ormesby, temp. Edward VI., was so created 1622). Same Arms. Crest—A reel or turnstile ppr.
3) (St. Albans, co. Hertford; Dorothy, dau. of Thomas Skipwith, of that place, m. Leonard Perrott, of Drayton, co. Oxford. Visit. Oxon, 1566; granted 1507). Gu. three bars ar. in chief a greyhound in full course per pale or and erm. collared az. Crest—A griffin’s head erased per fess gu. and az. guttée d’or, holding in his beak a lion’s paw couped erm.
4) (Hever, co. Lancaster, and Snowers, co. Norfolk). Ar. three bars gu. in chief a greyhound courant sa. (another, within a border sa.). Crest—A turnpike or.
5) (co. Lincoln). Gu. three bars ar. on a chief of the second a greyhound in full course sa.
6) (Stayne, co. Lincoln). Ar. three bars gu. in chief a greyhound courant sa. a border gobony or and az.
7) (co. Lincoln). Ar. two bars gu. in chief a greyhound pass. sa.
8) (co. Norfolk). Sa. two bars ar. on a chief of the second a greyhound courant of the first.
9) Barry of eight ar. and gu. per pale counterchanged, in chief a greyhound in full course sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92