Slaughter Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Slaughter Family Coat of Arms

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Slaughter Coat of Arms Meaning

Slaughter Name Origin & History

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Slaughter Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Slaughter blazon are the saltire, eagle and ducal coronet. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and argent.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The saltire is one the major ordinaries, large charges that occupy the whole of the field 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire. Arguably one of the best uses of this device is that of the St. Andrews Cross, a white saltire on a blue background found on the Scottish flag. The saltire is obviously closely related to the Cross, and Wade in his work on Heraldic Symbology suggests additionally that it alludes to “Resolution”, whilst Guillim, an even more ancient writer, somewhat fancifully argues that it is awarded to those who have succesfully scaled the walls of towns! 6A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

Crowns are frequently observed in Heraldry 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184, but we should not make the mistake of assuming that these are always on Royal arms 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138. Many of the orders of nobility across Europe were entitled to wear crowns and coronets, Dukes, Earls, Viscounts and Barons in England each had their own distinctive headwear 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350. The ducal coronet is an example of this, being gold with a brim of strawberry leaves and a cap of crimson velvet. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Crown It may also be the case that a crown is added to an existing coat of arms as an augmentation in recognition of some service to a King 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 187.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Slaughter Name

Slaughter Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The Slaughter surname derives from four different possible sources. First, it was an occupational surname used for workers who slaughtered animals. The Middle English word “slather”, which itself comes from the Old English word “sleaht” which means slaughter or killing. Second, it could be a geographical nickname used to describe someone who lived near a muddy bank or boggy place. The Middle English word “sloghtre”, which itself comes from the Old English word “sloh” which means slough. Third, it could be a geographical name specifically from locations with this name. Fourth, it could be a surname used to describe someone who lived near a “sloe tree”. The Old English word “slahtreow” means sloe tree or blackthorn. Slaughter could also sometimes written as Slatter which derives from”slagter”, a Danish word meaning butcher.

Variations:

More common variations are: Slaughteer, Slaugheter, Slaughtear, Slaughtery, Slaughater, Slaughtr, Slaughterii, Slaughterho, Sloughter, Slaughtor

History:

England:

The first known recorded spelling of the name is Robert de Scloctres in 1191 in Gloucestershire in the Pipe Rolls.

In Gloucestershire in 1273 Ballizus de Sloutre was recorded in the Hundred Rolls.

Mariota de la Sloghtere in 1296 was recorded in Susses, and Roger Slaghtere in 1360 was recorded in Suffolk.

The first church recording of the name was the christening of William Slaughter in 1572 in St Andrew by the Wardrobe in London.

In 1606 Henry Slaughter was recorded to wed Ales Taylor at St John Hackney in London.

The geographical surname derives from possible locations such as Upper and Lower Slaughter in Gloucestershire.

United States:

The first known Slaughters in the United States was John Slaughter who would arrive in Virginia in 1622. In 1635, Rebecca Slaughter settled in Virginia as well. In 1648, Bartholmew Slaughter would land in Maryland from England. Charles and Dorothy Slaughter who settled in Virginia in 1665.

The 18th century would see more Slaughters arrive from Europe. Hance Slaughter arrived in Pennsylvania in 1729. John Slaughter in 1764 would arrive in America, but where he settled was not known. In 1772, another John Slaughter settled in West New Jersey.

In 1850, P Slaughter arrived in San Francisco from England.

Most Slaughter descendants are thought to be from the line of John and Frances Slaughter from New Kent, Virginia circa 1751 or Robert and Frances Slaughter from Virginia circa 1700.

Slaughter is the 465th most common surname for African-Americans.

Australia

On the ship “Florentina” Matthew Slaughter at the age of 41 arrrived in South Australia.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Slaughter:

30,000 in the United States (mainly in Virginia and Texas), 2,000 in England , 600 in South Africa, 500 in Australia

Notable People:

C.C. Slaughter (1837 – 1919), American rancher, banker and philanthropist in the American Old West. He served for the Confederacy during the Civil War, and would eventually own 40,000 cattle and over a million acres of land in West Texas. He was the largest taxpayer in Texas, and was known as the “Cattle King of Texas”

Enos Slaughter (1916 – 2002), Hall of Fame baseball player. He played major league baseball for 19 seasons, and he played primarily for the St Louis Cardinals and famous for scoring the winning run in the seventh game of the 1946 world series. He was a 10 time all-star and is in the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Fenton M. Slaughter (1826 – 1897), American politician. He would eventually settle in St Louis after being born in Virginia. He was captured by Navajo during the Mexican-American war. He was discharged in 1847 and joined the gold rush. He became very wealthy after working as a sheep farmer, and would eventually enter politics.

George Webb Slaughter (1811), American Baptist minister. He was also a cattle breeder and rancher in Texas. He baptized over 3,000 people, ordained more preachers, and organized more churches than any other person in the state of Texas.

John Horton Slaughter (1841 – 1922), American lawman, poker player, rancher, and cowboy. He was in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, and fought off hostile Indians and Mexicans. He would live the latter half of his life in San Bernardino.

Walter Slaughter (1860 – 1908), composer of musicals, notably comedies, and comic operas, and children’s shows. He was at the West End as a composer and director from 1883 to 1904.

William B. Slaughter (1797 – 1879), American politician. He attended William & Mary. He would later move to Kentucky and join the Kentucky bar.

Slaughter Family Gift Ideas

Browse Slaughter family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Slaughter, co. Gloucester, cos. Hereford and Worcester). Ar. a saltire az. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an eagle's head betw. two wings expanded az. beaked gold.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire
6. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Crown
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 187