Anderson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Anderson Family Coat of Arms

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Anderson Coat of Arms Meaning

Anderson Name Origin & History

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Anderson Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Anderson blazon are the chevron and cross crosslet. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and azure .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.10The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, being symetrical both vertically and horizontally and having an additional cross bar on each arm. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Anderson Name

Anderson Origin:

Scotland, Sweden, Germany, England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Anderson was derived from the given name Andrew. This personal given name of Andrew derived from the Greek given personal name of “Andreas” which derived itself from “andreois” which evolved out of the Greek word “aner” which can be translated to mean “man” or “male.” This name was largely popular with the Christian population because of the biblical connotations. Andrew was the name of the first of Christ’s disciples, according to Christian belief.

Variations:

More common variations are:

History:

Sweden:

The surname of Anderson is largely popular in the country of Sweden. The surname of Anderson is the second most common surname in the country.

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Anderson in the country of Scotland was found in the year 1443, and was named in the Cuper-Angus record. One Henry Androsoun was said to have leased part of Balmy in this year. Another mention of this surname was in the year 1585, when John Andirstoun was named the commissioner to parliament for Coupar in the year 1585. This surname is found throughout the country of Scotland. St. Andrew is regarded as the patron saint of the country of Scotland, which is why there is a large population of Scottish citizens with both this given personal name of Andrew, and the surname of Anderson.

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Anderson was found in the country of England. One person by the name of Rogerus Andreweson, was named in the Poll Tax Returns of Yorkshire in the year of 1272. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward I, who was known as, and commonly referred to throughout history as “Longshanks.” King Edward I ruled from the year 1272 to the year 1307. Another mention of the surname of Anderson was one person by the name of Neal Anderson, who was the son of Erasmus and Mary Anderson, who was christened at St. Katherine by the Tower, London, on March 19th, in the year 1698. In the manor in the parish of Eyworth in Bedfordshire, there was a seat of Sir Edmund Anderson, who sat as one of the judges in the trial of Mary, Queen of Scots. Within this church there are also monuments dedicated to the Anderson family of this area, and of this time period.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th century, many European citizens were looking for a new place to reside. The poor living conditions, the inability to own land in their countries, the lack of jobs, and the strict religious government pushed these European citizens out of their homes, and looking towards a new life. The most common place for this new life to take shape was in the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as The New World, or The Colonies. The United States of America promised freedom of religion, the capability to buy and cultivate land, the prospect of new jobs, and better living conditions than what the European citizens had been previously experiencing. This large movement was referred to as The European Migration. The first person who bore the surname of Anderson that settled in the New World was one Heinrich Anderson, who sailed to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the year 1627. Seven years later, in the year 1634, one Thomas Anderson arrived in the state of Virginia. Those who carry the surname of Anderson can be found in large concentrations in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, and Michigan.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Anderson: United States 872,825; Brazil 136,275; England 63,880; Canada 62,516; Australia 54,227; Nigeria 38,667; South Africa 34,500; Ghana 26,120; Scotland 21,146;

Notable People:

Arthur John Miles Anderson (1922-2016) who was an actor on the radio, in films, on television, and on the stage, who was most notably recognized for Midnight Cowboy (1969), Jump Tomorrow (2001) and Oh Sister (2011)

Signe Toly Anderson (1941-2016) who was a singer from America who was one of the founding members of the band, Jefferson Airplane

Benedict Richard O’Gorman Anderson (1936-2015) who was an academic and a writer from America, was an Aaron L. Binenkorb Professor Emeritus of International Studies, and Government & Asian Studies at Cornell University

Jane Anderson (born in 1954) who is an Emmy Award winning actress, playwright, screenwriter, and director

Murphy C. Anderson Jr. (1926-2015) who was a comic book artist from America, who worked on Hawkman, Batgirl, the Spectre, Superman, Zatanna, and the Buck Rogers daily syndicated newspaper strip

Lennart Anderson (1928-2015) who was a painter from the United States of America

Lynn Rene Anderson (1947-2015) who was a multiple-award-winning country music singer who was most notably remembered for her song “(I Never Promised You a) Rose Garden”

Anderson Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

First notation: 1673 W polu błękitnym krokiew czerwona, pomiędzy trzema krzyżami złotymi zdwojonymi. W klejnocie nad hełmem w koronie trzy strusie pióra.Labry: Błękitne, podbite złotem.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
10. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103