Arburthnot Coat of Arms

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Findourie, Scotland). Motto—Interna proestant. Az. a crescent betw. three stars within a bordure ar. Crest—A peacock ppr.
2) (Catherlan). Motto—Sit laus Deo. Az. a crescent betw. three stars within a bordure ar. charged with eight cinquefoils of the first. Crest—A peacock's head couped ppr. charged with a mullet or.
3) (Montrose, 1685). Motto—lnnocue ac provide. Az. a crescent betw. three stars ar. all within a bordure indented and quartered of the second and first. Crest—A dove within an adder disposed orleways.
4) (Viscount Arbuthnot). Motto—Laus Deo. Az. a crescent betw. three stars ar. Crest—A peacock’s head couped ppr. beaked or. Supporters—Two dragons wings expanded and tails nowed vert vomiting flames of fire ppr.
5) (Weymouth, 1685). Motto—Fluctuo sed affluo. Az. a crescent betw. three stars ar. a bordure wavy of the last. Crest—A ship under sail ppr.
6) (Dr. James Arbuthnot, grandson of 2nd Viscount Arbuthnot). Mottoes—Deus me austentat. Laus Deo. Az. a crescent betw. three stars ar. within a bordure crenelle or. Crest—A peacock’s head couped ppr.
7) (Fiddes, co. Kincardine). Motto—Tam interna quam externa. Az. a crescent betw. three stars within an orle of eight frazes ar. Crest—A peacock pass. ppr.
8) (Sir William Arbuthnot, Bart., Lord Provost of Edinburgh in 1822). Motto—Innocent and true. Az. a crescent betw. three mullets ar. within a bordure or. charged with as many boars’ heads erased gu. Crest: A peacock's head ppr. Supporters— Dexter, a wyvern with wings expanded and tail nowed vert spouting out fire; sinister, a greyhound ppr. collared gu. Ieashed or.
9) Az. a crescent betw. three stars ar. Within an orle of eight frazes of the last.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Arburthnot Coat of Arms and Family Crest

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Arburthnot Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Arburthnot blazon are the mullet, crescent and peacock. The two main tinctures (colors) are argent and or.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 7A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The peacock provides an instantly recognisable species, almost always facing the viewer with the full glory of the tail expanded in a pose known as in his pride. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Peacock Wade reckons it the “most beautiful and proudest of birds”. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
7. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Peacock
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77