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Archbold Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Archbold Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Archbold Family Coat of Arms

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Archbold Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Archbold blazon are the fleur-de-lis, lion and saltire. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, gules and sable .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 15A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The saltire is one the major ordinaries, large charges that occupy the whole of the field 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire. Arguably one of the best uses of this device is that of the St. Andrews Cross, a white saltire on a blue background found on the Scottish flag. The saltire is obviously closely related to the Cross, and Wade in his work on Heraldic Symbology suggests additionally that it alludes to “Resolution”, whilst Guillim, an even more ancient writer, somewhat fancifully argues that it is awarded to those who have succesfully scaled the walls of towns! 18A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Archbold Name

Archbold Origin:

England, Ireland, Scotland

Origins of Archbold:

This name, with various spellings such as Archibold, Archibould, Archbutt, Archbell, Archbald, Archanbault, and Archambault, acquires from the Norman given name “Archambault,” a combination of the Germanic components “ercan” which means “precious” and “bald,” strong and brave. The name was brought into England by supporters of William the Conqueror after the invasion of 1066. One Archembold Wiverum noted in the 1130 Pipe Rolls of London, and one Erchenbaldus, Abbot of Dunfermelyne, listed in the Record of Holy Trinity Abbey, Scone, near the year 1180. He also appears as “Arkebalous” and “Arkenbaldus” in the same records. The surname was first noted in England in the early 13th Century, and other early documentations containing William Ercmebaud, an observer in the 1239 Fine Court Rolls of Suffolk, and a Robert Archebalde, who had a law of the Hospital of Roxburgh in 1390 from Robert 111 of Scotland. In 1545, one John Archibald was a witness in St. Andrews, “Calendar of the Laing Charters,” 854 – 1837.

Variations:

More common variations are: Archibold, Archbould, Archabold, Archubold, Arichbold, Archebold, Archiebold, Archybold, Archbald, Archabld.

England:

The surname Archbold first appeared throughout Southern England. As a particular name, Archbold can appear in the Domesday Book (1086) as Erchenbaldus, Arcenbaldus, and Arcebaldus. The first document of an Archbold surname shows to be Robert Archenbold, noted in the Pipe Rolls for Gloucester in 1210.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert Archenbold, dated about 1210, in the “Pipe Rolls of Gloucestershire.” It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199-1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Archbold had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Archbold landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Archbold who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Tho Archbold landed in St Christopher in 1635. George Archbold, who came to Maryland in 1675.

The following century saw more Archbold surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Archbold who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Helen Archbold, who landed in America, in 1906. Bella Archbold at the age of 32, who landed in America from London, England, in 1907. Elizabeth Archbold, who shifted to the United States, in 1910. Annie Archbold at the age of 22, who landed in America from Dublin, Ireland, in 1911. James Archbold, who settled in America from Tullow, Ireland, in 1912.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Archbold who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Bridget Archbold, aged 25, a servant, arrived in South Australia in 1850 aboard the ship “Joseph Soames.” Bridget Archbold also arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Joseph Somes” in the same year 1850.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Archbold who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Thomas Archbold arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Rooparell” in 1874. Esther C. Archbold and William Archbold, aged 1, both arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Rooparell” in the same year 1874. Catherine Archbold also arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Rooparell” in the same year 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Archbold: Colombia 2,463; United States 1,575; England 979; Panama 653; Australia 531; Ireland 355; Scotland 190; New Zealand 189; Canada 155; Wales 79.

Notable People:

John Dana Archbold (1910-1993), was an agriculturalist, sportsman, contributor, engineer, and conservationist.

John Dustin Archbold (1848-1916), was an American entrepreneur and grandfather of Richard Archbold.

John Frederick Archbold (1785–1870), was a British legal author.

Ralph Archbold is a historical impersonator of Benjamin Franklin.

Richard Archbold (1907-1976), was an American biologist.

Shane Archbold (1989-), was a New Zealand professional racing cyclist.

Archbold Family Gift Ideas

Browse Archbold family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Kilmacud, co. Dublin). Erm. a saltire and a chief gu. Crest—A lion’s head couped erm. guttee de sang.
2) (Worcestershire, Visit, of London, 1634). Ar. a lion ramp. betw. six fleurs-de-lis sa. a crescent for difference. Crest—A dove rising ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
15. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire
18. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63
19. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
20. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
21. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
22. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
23. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
24. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
25. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
26. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
27. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
28. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
29. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
30. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
31. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
32. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
33. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
34. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
35. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire
36. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63