Arnold Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Arnold Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Arnold. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Arnold Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Arnold blazon are the chevron, dolphin and pheon. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, sable and gules .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.10The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

In the days before television and the internet it was a rare heraldic artist that had ever seen a dolphin for real, so we should not be surprised that the heraldic representation is not instantly recognisable. Despite this, we should not forget that these artists considered the dolphin to be the king of fish, playing the same role as the lion in the animal kingdom. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin For reasons not immediately clear, Wade suggests that the dolphin was regarded as an “affectionate fish, fond of music”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Arnold Name

Arnold Origin:

Germany, England

Origins of Arnold:

The surname of Arnold is said to have been prominent in the German and English cultures, from which it originated. This surname is said to have derived from the personal names of Ernault or Arnolt, both of which have compounded separate elements. Both of these personal given names are composed of the element “arn” which can be translated to mean “an eagle” and the element of “wald” which can be translated to mean “to rule.” This surname of Arnold is also possibly a locational surname. This means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. The locations from which this surname is possibly derived include the English village of Arnold in East Riding of Yorkshire, and the other village named Arnold in Nottinghamshire.

Variations:

More common variations are: Arnould, Arnot, Arnott, Yarnold, Arnoldi, Arnhold, Arnoldo, Arnoldy, Arnolda

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Arnold is found within the country of England. One person by the name of William Arnold, who was mentioned as living in the county of Suffolk in the year 1277. This record was created under the reign of one King Edward I of England, who was known throughout the ages as “Edward Longshanks,” and also as “The Hammer of the Scots.” King Edward I was such named for the many brutal wars and conquests that he waged on Scotland during his reign. King Edward I ruled from the year 1272 to the year 1307. Those who bear the surname of Arnold within the country of England can be found in high concentrations in the areas of Yorkshire, into Lancashire, Essex, Kent, Sussex, and Middlesex counties, as well as the areas in and around the city of London.

Germany:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Arnold within the country of Germany can be found in the year 1282. One person by the name of Adler Arnold was recorded as living in the area of Meskirch in the year of 1282.

Scotland:

Within the country of Scotland, there are many people who bear the surname of Arnold. The areas with the largest populations of people who carry this surname include many areas throughout the southwestern area of the country of Scotland. The counties with the highest concentrations of people who are known by the surname of Arnold include Ayrshire, Dumfries-shire, and Lanarkshire counties.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th Century, many European citizens migrated to the United States of America. This movement, which was referred to as The European Migration, was the result of disgruntled European citizens, and the living conditions that they encountered. Those who migrated to the United States of America with the surname of Arnold can be found in high concentrations in the states of Georgia, Iowa, Wisconsin, New York, Washington, Ohio, Texas, Illinois, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, California, Missouri, and Kentucky.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Arnold: United States 158,728; England 24,016; Uganda 16,990; Australia 10,910; South Africa 10,283; Canada 9,044; Nigeria 5,808; France 5,756; Switzerland 5,591; Brazil 5,199

Notable People:

Edward Zachery Arnold, who was a politician from America and who was also the Georgia State Auditor from the year 1938 to the year 1941

Zach Arnold, who was Democratic politician from America who was a Georgia delegate to the Democratic National Convention for the year 1940

Willian Wright Arnold (1877-1957) who was a Democratic Politician from America, who was also the Illinois 23rd District Representative to the United States House of Representatives from the year 1923 to the year 1935

William R. Arnold, who was a politician from America, and who also was a Bishop, and the United States Army Chief of Chaplains, as well as a speaker for the Democratic National Convention in the year of 1948

William Hendrick Arnold (born in 1861) who was a Democratic politician from America who was also a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention in the year 1892 as well as the year 1904 and the year 1916

William Charlie Arnold (1851-1906) who was a Republican politician from American, and who was also a Representative for Pennsylvania in the 28th District to the United States House of Representatives

Arnold Family Gift Ideas

Browse Arnold family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Devonshire). Sa a chev. betw. three dolphins embowed ar. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet an antelope’s head.
2) (Cromer, co. Norfolk and Ballesford, co. Suffolk). Arms the same. Crest—A dolphin embowed ar.
3) (Gloucestershire, granted 1653). Gu. a chev. erm, betw. three pheons or.
4) (Gloucestershire). Gu. a chev. erm. betw. three escallop shells or.
5) (Chilwick, co. Hertford). Gu. a chev. quarterly erm. and ermines, betw. three pheons or. Crest—An eagle’s head erased gu. gorged with a mural coronet ar. holding in the beak an acorn, slipped, leaved vert.
6) (Huntingdonshire). Sa. two lions pass. or.
7) (London, granted 31 December, 1612). (Little Missenden Abbey, co. Bucks). Gu. three pheons ar. on a chief of the second a bar nebulee az. Crest—A demi tiger sa. bezants, maned and tufted or, holding a broad arrow shaft gu. feathers and pheon ar.
8) Gu. a chev. betw. three pheons or.
9) Az. a lion ramp. ar.
10) Gu. a chev. ermines betw. three pheons or. Crest—A demi tiger ar. pellettee betw. the paws a fire-ball sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
10. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111