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Ashfield Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Ashfield Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Ashfield Family Coat of Arms

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Ashfield Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Ashfield blazon are the fleur-de-lis, mullet, cinquefoil and goose. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and argent .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Ashfield Name

Ashfield Origin:

England

Origins of Ashfield:

This surname is of old English origin and is geographical from many places so named, for example, in Shropshire, and two places in Suffolk. The origin is from the Old English pre 7th Century ‘aesc’, which means an ash tree, with ‘feld,’ which means open country, and the first documentation of the place in Shropshire shows as ‘Assefeld,’ in the Pipe Rolls of 1167. However, the two places in Suffolk have different origins, for example, Ashfield near Debenham first listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as ‘Assefelda,’ and in the Feet of Fines of 1196 as ‘Esfeld,’ whereas Great Ashfield shows in the Domesday Book as ‘Eascefelda.’ In Alveley, Shropshire, there was an early record of the naming of Doryty Ashfield in March 1592, and in Little Saxham, Suffolk, the wedding of Marie Ashfield and Andrew Gilmin in June 1586.

Variations:

More common variations are: Aishfield, Ashfild, Asheffield, Ashfeild, Aishafild, Eschfield, Ashfold, Ashfelt.

England:

The surname Ashfield first appeared in Suffolk, at Ashfield, which dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086 when it was noted there as Assefelda. Great Ashfield, Suffolk was also recorded there as Eascefelda. Ashfield is the name of an old hamlet originally named Esfeld in 1216. It is now a local government district in western Nottinghamshire built in 1974. And today, Ashfield is a neighborhood in the Inner West of Sydney, in New South Wales, Australia. This latter local was founded shortly after the First Fleet appearance in 1788.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Margaret Ashfield, dated about 1569, near the Bury St. Edmunds, Denham. It was during the time of Queen Elizabeth I, who was known to be the “Good Queen Bess,” dated 1558-1603. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Ashfield had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Ashfield landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Ashfield who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included James Ashfield settled in Virginia in 1636. John Ashfield settled in West New Jersey in 1664. William Ashfield, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1691.

People with the surname Ashfield who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Henry Ashfield settled in Maryland in 1776.

The following century saw more Ashfield surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Ashfield who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included James Ashfield, who arrived in New York in 1836. G Ashfield who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Ashfield who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Andrew Ashfield at the age of 32, arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship “William Prowse.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Ashfield: England 1,334; United States 332; Canada 304; Australia 184; South Africa 146; Wales 56; Scotland 20; New Zealand 17; Czech Republic 3; Uruguay 3.

Notable People:

Edmund Ashfield (1576 – ca. 1620) was an English Romanist from Tattenhoe in Buckinghamshire. He was trained at St Mary Hall, Oxford. In 1599, he progressed to Edinburgh to meet James VI of Scotland. The resident English ambassador organized his kidnap and performance apparently in the belief that Ashfield was an agent of James VI and working to move to the English throne. In 1606, Ashfield was included in the rebuilding of Ashridge Priory for Sir Thomas Egerton.

Edmund Ashfield was a 17th-century English artist.

George Ashfield (1934-1985), was an English football player.

Kate Ashfield was a British actress.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, and Warwickshire, confirmed by the Deputies of Camden, Clarenceux, to Humphrey Ash, third in descent from John Ash of Heythorp). Ar. a trefoil slipped sa. between three mullets gu. Crest—A wolf courant erm.
2) (Sir Robert Ashfield, knighted in Christchurch, Dublin, 24 Sept. 1598). Sa. a fess engr. betw. three fleurs- de-lis ar.
3) (Suffolk). Gu. a fesse indented counter-indented, two points at each end betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar.
4) (Sussex). Sa. a fesse engr. betw. two fleurs-de-lis ar. a crescent for diff.
5) (Yorkshire). Sa. a fesse betw. three fleurs-de-lis and a bordure ar.
6) (Oxfordshire). Barry wavy of six ar. and sa.
7) Or, on a mount vert a Magellan goose, body sa. head ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
19. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
20. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
21. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
22. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
23. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
24. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
25. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
26. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
27. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
28. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
29. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
30. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
31. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
32. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil