Bagnall Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bagnall Family Coat of Arms

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Bagnall Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Bagnall blazon are the lion rampant, barry, martlet and ineschutheon. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, ermine and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

When the field of the shield is filled with alternately coloured horizontal lines, this is known as barry, obviously because it is like having many separate bars across the field 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barry. Such shields have great clarity from a distance, those awarded by Henry III of England to Richard de Grey were, for example, Barry argent and azure, simple blue and white horizontal stripes. According to Wade, there was no specific meaning to be attached to barry itself, but it affords the opportunity to display at equal importance two colours that may themselves have specific meanings 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P55.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bagnall Name

Bagnall Origin:

England

Origins of Bagnall:

This interesting and unique surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a geographical name from a place so called in Staffordshire, which was noted as “Badegenhall” in 1273, in the Assize Rolls. The place name is a combination of the Olde English particular name “Badeca, Baduca,” from a short form of the different compound names with the first component “beadu,” battle, and the Olde English “halh,” which means recess, corner. Variants of the name in the new era contain Bagnell, Bagenal, and Bagnold. The surname first showed at the end of the 13th Century, while John Bagenelle shows in the 1379 “Calendar of Letter-Books of the City of London,” and Ralph Bagnall listed in the Patent Rolls in 1561. An Irish family by the name Bagenal can traced to Sir Richard Bagenal (near the year 1586), who fled from England in 1539 after he had murdered a man in a brawl. He later was forgiven, and his ancestors rose to prominence, chiefly through weddings into some of Ireland’s leading families.

Variations:

More common variations are: Baignall. Bangnal, Bagnaulli, Bignall, Bagnell, Bugnall, Begnall, Bagnale, Bagnull, Bagnoll.

England:

The origins of the surname Bagnall appeared in Staffordshire where people held a family seat from old times. Some say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William de Bagenholt, dated about 1299, in the “Assize Court Rolls of Staffordshire.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Bagnall had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bagnall landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 18th. Some of the people with the name Bagnall who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Walter Bagnall settled in Massachusetts in 1620. Walter Bagnall who settled in Maine in 1626. Walter Bagnall, who landed in Maine in 1628. Roger Bagnall, who landed in Virginia in 1637. Thomas Bagnall settled in New England in 1654

The following century saw much more Bagnall surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Bagnall who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Richard Bagnall, who arrived in Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1723. Benjamin Bagnall, who landed in Boston, Massachusetts in the year 1724.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Bagnall who landed in Australia in the 19th century included William Bagnall, an English prisoner from York, who was transported aboard the “Albion” in September 1826, settling in New South Wales, Australia. Thomas Bagnall arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship “Lord Raglan.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Bagnall who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included William Bagnall, Lydia Bagnall, Mary Bagnall and Ann Bagnall at the age of 9, all came to Nelson aboard the ship “Olympus” in the same year 1842.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bagnall: England 4,141; United States 1,728; Australia 966; Canada 581; Ireland 502; South Africa 402; Wales 327; New Zealand 270; Northern Ireland 143; Scotland 138.

Notable People:

Anthony Bagnall is a senior Royal Air Force commander.

Bill Bagnall is an American magazine publisher and manager.

Drew Bagnall is a Canadian ice hockey player.

Geoff Bagnall is an Australian rugby league football player.

Gibbons Bagnall (1719–1800), was an English poet.

James Bagnall (1783–1855), was a Canadian printer, publisher, and leader.

James Eustace Bagnall (1830–1918), was a biologist.

Richard Siddoway Bagnall (1889–1962), was an entomologist.

Roger S. Bagnall (1947 –), is a professor of classics at Columbia University.

Bagnall Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bagnall family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Kent). Barry of six or (another, erm.) and sa. over all a lion ramp. az. Crest—A dragon's head erased gu. gorged with two bars or.
2) (Staffordshire and Wales). Erm. two bars or, over all a lion ramp. az. Crest—An antelope sejant ar. billettee sa. ducally gorged, lined, armed, and tufted or.
3) (Sir Henry Bagnall, of the Newry, co. Down, knighted at Christ Church, Dublin, 24 April, 1579). Erm. two bars or, over all a lion ramp. az. Crest—An heraldic antelope sejant vert crined ducally gorged and chained or.
4) (Wick and Worcester. After the Battle of Worcester William Bagnall, of Upper Wick, who d. 21 Sept. 1652, aged 36, gave his horse to Charles II., on which His Majesty fled through St. Martin’s Gate). Ermines two bars or, over all a lion ramp. double queued vert. Crest—An antelope sejant ar. billettee sa. horns and tail or, collared and chained of the same, chain reflexed over the back.
5) (Staffordshire). Sa. an inescutcheon erm. charged with a lion’s head erased vert within an orle of eight martlets or.
6) (Staffordshire). Sa. an inescutcheon erm. charged with a leopard's face, within an orle of martlets or.
7) Sa. an inescutcheon within an orle of martlets or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barry
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P55
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79