Barcroft Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Barcroft Family Coat of Arms

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Barcroft Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Barcroft blazon are the lion rampant, wolf, crescent and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.6The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

The wolf was the symbol of Rome long before the advent of heraldry, and before that was sacred to the ancient Egyptians. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P31 In heraldry it is probably more often just as head than the whole animal, but when whole it can be in many different poses. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wolf It is found from the earliest instances of arms, but quite often due to a derivative of its French name, loup sharing the initial sound of many family names like LOWE and LOVATT.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Barcroft Name

Barcroft Origin:

England

Origins of Barcroft:

This uncommon surname is English. It is a geographical name from Barcroft in Cliviger, Lancashire, or from Barcroft in the Haworth urban district of the West Riding of Yorkshire. The initial component of the name is either the Olde English pre 7th Century “bere”, which means barley, and also appeared in Barden (Yorkshire), or the Olde English “baer”, swine- pasture, with “croft”, a piece of enclosed land used for tillage or meadow, or a small piece of arable land near to a house. Geographical surnames, such as this, were originally given to local landholders, and the king of the palace, and especially as a source of recognition to those who departed from their birthplace to settle elsewhere. A family bearing the name Barcroft(e) resided in Lancashire in the reign of Henry III, and in May 1562, Henry Barcrofte and Elizabethe Haydock married at Burnley, Lancashire. The name was also well noted in Worcestershire Church Records as Barcrofte (Leigh with Bransford, 1576), and as Bearcroft (1639). In December of the latter year, William, son of Robert and Joane Bearcroft, named at St. Thomas’, Dudley, Worcestershire. A Royal symbol given to the Bearcroft family of Worcestershire was described as “Sable on a chevron in the mid of three bears’ heads erased argent, three swans close of the first.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Bearcroft, Barrcroft, Barcaroft, Brocroft, Bercroft, Burcroft, Barcorft, Brycroft, Barcraft, Beercroft.

England:

The origins of the surname Barcroft appeared in Lancashire where people held a family seat from old times. Someone say better before the success of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Barcorfte, dated about 1272, in Baines “History of Lancashire.” It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Barcroft had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Barcroft landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Barcroft who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Charles Barcroft, who settled in Virginia in 1636. Jane and John Barcroft landed in Virginia in 1637. Lane Barcroft who landed in Virginia in 1637. Jon Barcroft, who landed in Virginia in 1637. Cha Barcroft, who landed in Virginia in 1647.

People with the surname Barcroft who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Ambrose Barcroft, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1722. Ambrose Barcroft, who came to Pennsylvania in 1722. Miss Barcroft, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1727.

The following century saw much more Barcroft surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Barcroft who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included John Barcroft, who came to America in 1802. George Barcroft, who came to New York, NY in 1822.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Barcroft: United States 626; England 350; Scotland 59; Canada 41; Australia 4; Wales 2; Ireland 2; South Africa 1; Russia 1; Cayman Islands 1.

Notable People:

George Barcroft (before 1574 – c.1610) was an English writer of church music. He matriculated to Trinity College, Cambridge in December 1574, and continued with the degree of a BA in 1577–78. He was selected as a minor criterion and organist at Ely Cathedral in 1579. He was named priest at Peterborough in August 1590. He was appointed vicar of Dullingham, Cambridgeshire in 1589.

Sir Joseph Barcroft (1872–1947), was a British physiologist.

Judith Barcroft (born 1942), is an American Broadway and soap opera actress.

Peter Barcroft (1929–77), was an English cricket player.

Roy Barcroft (1902–69), was an American character actor.

Tom Barcroft (1870 – after 1909), was an English soccer manager.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Barcroft, co. Lancaster, 1664). Ar. a lion ramp. sa.
2) (confirmed to Henry Barcroft, Esq., of The Glen, co. Armagh, only son of the late Joseph Barcroft, of Lisburn, co. Antrim, descended from the family of Barcroft, of Noyna, co. Lancaster). Ar. a lion ramp. sa. in the dexter chief point a trefoil slipped vert. Crest—A demi bear ramp. gu. muzzled and charged on the shoulder with a trefoil slipped or.
3) (Meer Green, co. Worcester). Sa. on a chev. betw. three wolves’ heads erased ar. a mullet betw. two crescents gu. Crest—A wolf ramp. gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P31
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wolf
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106