Belt Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Belt Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Belt. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Belt Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Belt blazon are the cross, bezant and mullet. The four main tinctures (colors) are or, gules, argent and azure.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. In its basic form, the cross is created from two broad bands of colour at right angles covering the whole extent of the shield. It has been subject to all manner of embellishment, and the interested reader is referred to the references, especially Parker’s Heraldic dictionary for many examples of these. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P106 14A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P160-173 Suffice it to say that any armiger would be proud to have such an important device as part of their arms.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 17Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 18A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Belt Name

Belt Origin:

England

Origins of Belt:

The surname of Belt is seen as an occupational surname. This means that the original bearer of the surname actually carried out the job associated with the surname. In the case of occupational surnames, they are first given to the actual doer of the job, and then are often given to the son of the original bearer if he also follows his father’s footsteps into the family business. After two generations of the surname, it becomes hereditary, and is given to the family of the original bearer, and the generations following. The surname of Belt was given to those who were manufacturers of leather belts and straps. Another possible origin for the surname of Belt comes from the word of “billitier,” which can be translated to mean “caster.” A billitier was someone who casted metal church bells, but also casted various iron and bronze objects including pots, pieces of armor, and buckles.

Variations:

More common variations are: Bealt, Belty, Baelt, Belot, Belet, Belto, Belat, Belte, Buelt, Belut, Beelt, Boelt, Belta, Belit, Beldt, Bellt, Beltu, Bellot, Bellet, Belts, Bilt, Billitier, Belter

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Belt can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Arnold Belt was mentioned in the document known as the Feet Fines for the county of Essex in the year of 1203. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King John of England, who was known throughout the ages, and who was commonly known as one “John Lackland.” King John I of England ruled from the year of 1199 to the year of 1216. Other mentions of the surname of Belt within the country of England include one Benedict le Beleter who was mentioned in the document known as the Friary Rolls of Yorkshire in the year of 1295. Another mention of the surname of Belt within the country of England includes one William le Belytor, who was mentioned in the register of the abbey of Osney, which is located in Oxfordshire, in the year of 1247. Those who are known to bear the surname of Belt within the country of England can be found in large concentrations in the areas in and around the city of London. Others who bear the surname of Belt within the country of England can be found within the upper northern region of England.

Scotland:

Within the country of Scotland, there are many people who bear the surname of Belt. The areas that have large concentrations of those who bear the surname of Belt within the country of Scotland include Lanarkshire county and the areas surrounding it.

United States of America:

Within the United States of America, many European citizens began to migrate to the New World within the 17th and 18th centuries. These citizens were migrating to the United States of America, which at that time was known as the New World or The Colonies, in search of a better life for them and their families. This large movement of people to the United States of America was known as the European Migration, and sometimes referred to as the Great Migration. Among those who migrated to the United States of America was one Humfrey Belt, who arrived in the state of Virginia in the year of 1635. Those who are known to bear the surname of Belt within the United States of America can be found in the states of Georgia, Alabama, Texas, California, Illinois, Ohio, Missouri, New York and Pennsylvania.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Belt: United States 9,818; Netherlands 1,227; England 457; Germany 403; Brazil 270; Philippines 258; South Africa 164; Australia 150; Colombia 140; France 98; Canada 91; New Zealand 69

Notable People:

George Gordon Belt (1828-1869) who was a businessman, judge, soldier, and Confederate sympathizer from the United States of America.

Harry Hackleman Belt (1883-1950) who was a lawyer, educator and judge from the United States of America.

Elmer Belt (1893-1980) who was a surgeon, urologist, and pioneer in sex reassignment surgery from the United States of America.

Clarence W. Belt (1890-1969) who was a racecar driver from the United States of America.

Brandon Kyle Belt (born in 1988) who is a professional baseball player in Major League Baseball, the MLB, and who was a first baseman and outfielder from the United States of America.

Thomas Belt (1832-1878) who was a geologist and naturalist from the country of England.

Belt Family Gift Ideas

Browse Belt family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Bossall Hall, co. York). Blazon: Gules on a chevron argent between three bezants a cross pattee fitchee of the first between two mullets azure. Crest—On a mount vert a cross pattee fitchee gules.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P106
14. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P160-173
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
18. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105