Benge Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Benge Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Benge Coat of Arms Meaning

Benge Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Benge. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

benge coat of arms

Benge Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Benge blazon are the mullet, sword and eagle. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, azure and or .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! If a charge is described just as a simple sword then it will have a straight blade and cross handle, that may be of a different colour, and, unless specified, points upwards. Wade, quoting the earlier writer Guillim, signifies the use of the sword as representing “Government and Justice”.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

Benge Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Benge Name

Benge Origin:

England

Origin of Benge:

This unique surname originates from the Kentish area of England which is extraordinary as the origins are Germanic – Anglo Saxon. The name derives from the word “Benzo”, a word dating to the beginning of the 7th Century. The name today can be found in the surnames Benz, Benge, Bence and probably Bench, and recorded in England during the period of Norman Invasion (1066). The name’s recorded history consists of William Bence (1275, Oxford), Semon Bencelyn (1327, Suffolk), Robert Benche (1279, Cambridge) at the same time Maryn Bengs is listed at St. Michaels, Bassishaw, in London in 1567 and John Benge who was christened at St. Martins in the Field, Westminster on April 1585 in the period of Queen Elizabeth I.

Variations:

More common variations are: Beange, Bengey, Bengeh, Bwenge, Benage, Bengea, Bhenge, Bengie, Bienge, Buenge.

England:

The surname Benge can be found in Gloucestershire, where they held a family seat from early times.

The very first recorded spelling of the family name was shown to be that of Osmund Benz, dated 1086, in The Domesday Book, Derbyshire. It was during the time of King William I who was known to be the “Conqueror,” 1066 – 1087. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Benge settled in the United States in the 17th century. Some of the people with the name Benge who settled in the United States in the 17th century included William Benge, who arrived in Virginia in 1619 and Will Benge, who landed in Virginia in 1653.

Australia:

Individuals with the surname Benge settled in the Australia in the 19th century. Some of the people with the name of Benge who settled in Australia in the 19th Century included John Benge at the age of 20, arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Eliza.” John Benge arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Eliza” in 1849.

New Zealand:

Individuals with the surname Benge settled in New Zealand in the 19th century. Some of the people with the name of Benge who settled in New Zealand in the 19th Century included Nicholas Benge and David Benge both landed in Wellington, New Zealand in the same year in 1840. David Benge at the age of 36 who was a farm laborer, Sarah Benge at the age of 34, and Elizabeth Benge, at the age of 6, all arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Catherine Stewart Forbes” in the same year in 1841.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Benge: United States 5,055; England 839; Angola 4,802; Indonesia 550; New Zealand 395; Tanzania 219; Zimbabwe 86; Australia 195; Canada 76; South Africa 164.

Notable People:

Alfreda Benge (born 1940), a British composer and cartoonist. She was born in 1940 in Austria to a Polish mother and came to England in 1947. She got married to a singer Robert Wyatt in the year 1974.

Bob Benge (1762–1794), was an American Indian chief. He was one of the most worrisome Cherokee chiefs during the Cherokee–American battles (1783-1794) in the area of Tennessee.

Chris Benge (born 1962), was an American congressman from Oklahoma.

Elden Benge (1904–1960), was an American manufacturer. He was born in July 1904 in Winterset, Iowa, and was a trumpet player for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Fred Benge was a New Zealand football player.

Harvey Benge is a New Zealand cameraman who lives in Auckland and Paris. He has presented his work in European exhibitions.

Howard Benge (1913–1986), was a New Zealand rower.

Ray Benge (1902–1997) was an American baseball player. He was the leader in the National League in Home Runs (24) and Earned Runs(139) in 1929.

Wilson Benge (1875–1955), was an English artist who frequently performed in American films.

Benge, was a nickname of Ben Edwards, a British singer and director established in London, England.

Benge Family Gift Ideas

Browse Benge family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More benge Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: None. Blazon: Or, three mullets azure on a canton gules a dagger in pale argent hilted of the first. Crest—An eagle displayed proper.

1 Comment

  • Daniel says:

    Amazing stuff. I will be buying some things soon. I have been learning about my dad’s side of my family since he left when I was 4. My name is spelled Ben’s but was told it had been changed early on by my great, great grandfather who was part of the Cherokee Nation. In Cherokee the Benge would be prounounced as Bence. His name was George Washington Benge, then Bence. There are so many George’s in my family it’s ridiculous. Its all making so much more sense now. Thank you for the service you provide. I will share,this with my family and friends.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74