Bicknell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bicknell Family Coat of Arms

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Bicknell Coat of Arms Meaning

Bicknell Name Origin & History

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Bicknell Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Bicknell blazon are the lion and dragon. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and vert .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Dragons have a long history in Heraldry and indeed have come to symbolise entire countries. Originally they were perhaps based on garbled descriptions of crocodiles given by returning travellers but soon developed a widely accepted representation. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin Wade suggests that their appearance signifies “a most valiant defender of treasure”, a trait of dragons that we are still familiar with today. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P86

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bicknell Name

Bicknell Origin:

England

Origins of Bicknell:

This interesting and unique surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a geographical surname that derives from a shortened form of the regions in Bickenhall, in Somerset, or Bickenhill, in Warwickshire. The area in Somerset is listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Bichehalle”, and as “Bikenhal” in the 1243 Assize Court Rolls of the county, and meanings as “Bica’s” or “Becca’s hall”, or “slope”, acquired from the Olde English pre 7th Century name “Bic(c)a”, from “becca”, pickaxe or matlock, combined with either the word “hyll”, which means hill, or “heall”, which means hall. The place in Warwickshire is listed as “Bichehelle” in the Domesday Book, and as “Bykenhull” in the year 1220, and means “Bic(c)a’s hill,” acquired from the Olde English components from above. The new surname can appear as Bicknell, Bignell, Bignall and Bignold. One Zachary Bicknell moved from Barrington, Somerset, to Weymouth, Massachusetts, in 1635.

Variations:

More common variations are: Bicknelle, Bickenell, Bicknel, Bcknell, Bicnell, Bickinella, Bucknell, Picknell, Bicknall, Becknell.

England:

The origins of the surname Bicknell found in Somerset and Warwickshire where people held a family seat from early times. Someone say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Thomas de Bikenhulle, dated about 1214, in the “Curia Regis Rolls of Warwickshire.” It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland”, dated 1199- 1216.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Bicknell had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bicknell settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Bicknell who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Zachary Bicknell, from Somerset, England, and Zanchary Bicknell, both arrived in Weymouth, Massachusetts in the same year 1635. John Bicknell arrived in Weymouth, Massachusetts in the year 1658.

Some of the people with the surname Bicknell who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Thomas Bicknell who would eventually settle in Providence, Rhode in 1770.

The following century saw many more Bicknell surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Bicknell who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Mrs. Bicknell in San Francisco, California in the year 1851.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Bicknell who settled in Australia in the 19th century included William Bicknell at the age of 33 arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Sultana” in the year 1851. William Bicknell at the age of 33 landed in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Sultana” in the year 1851.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Bicknell who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Joseph Bicknell who was a laborer at the age of 35, Elizabeth Bicknell and John Bicknell, all arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Clifton” in the same year 1842. John Bicknell and Joseph Bicknell, both arrived in Wellington, New-Zealand in the same year 1840.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bicknell: United States 3,914; England 2,700; Australia 700; Canada 442; South Africa 128; Scotland 105; New-Zealand 265; Spain 18; Zimbabwe 13; Jamaica 143.

Notable People:

Andrew Bicknell, (born 1956), was an English artist.

Bennet Bicknell, (1781-1841), was a US Representative from New York.

Clarence Bicknell, (1842-1918), was a British priest, biologist, and esperantist

Darren Bicknell, (born 1967), was an English cricket player.

Ed Bicknell, (born 1948), was an English businessman.

Eugene Pintard Bicknell (1859-1925), was an American biologist and ornithologist

Francis Bicknell Carpenter, (1830-1900), was an American painter.

Greg Bicknell, American player in baseball.

Jack Bicknell, (born 1938), was an American football head coach.

John Dustin Bicknell, (1838-1911), was a Los Angeles advocate.

Martin Bicknell, (born 1969), was an English cricket player.

Steve Bicknell, (born 1959), was an English football player.

Thomas W. Bicknell, (1834-1925), was an American writer.

Bicknell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bicknell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Spring Garden Terrace). Blazon: Ar. two bars gu. over all a lion ramp, of the first. Crest—A dragon's head vert collared couped at the neck.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P86