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Origin, Meaning, Family History and Blakeney Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Blakeney Origin:

England

Origin of Blakeney:

Blakeney is an unusual surname which is believed to originate from an early ancient English origin and is also a locational name from two areas. One in Gloucestershire and the other in Norfolk. The region in Gloucestershire is listed as “Blachen” in 1185, and as “Blakeneia” in the 1196 Pipe Revolution of the division, and which means “Dark Isle,” acquired from the words "blaec," which means black, with,", e.g., ieg," which means island. These words are associated with Olde English prior to the 7th Century. The area in Norfolk authentically named as “Snitterley,” and listed as “Snuterlea,” in the Domesday Book of 1086, which means “Snytra’s clearance,” related to the Olde English particular name "Snytra," and "leah," which means woodland, valley, or clearance. The area had become as "Blakenye" by 1242 when it listed in the Norfolk Close Revolution. The wedding of Nicholas Blakeney and Jane Mennell registered at St. Mary Magdalen, Old Fish Street, London, in August 1547.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Bleakeney, Blackeney, Blaakeney, Blakeeney, Blakkeney, Blakney, Blakeny, Blkeney, Blakene, Blackney.

England:

The name Blakeney firstly originated in Norfolk where they held a family seat as king of the palace of Blakeney which was the “King’s Estate” at the time of the taking of the Domesday Book. Blakeney contained seven hamlets whose senior resident was Lord Hugh of Chester. The Blakeneys descended from the previous Norman imperial who held his estates from Lord Hugh. One related states “Blakeney is a church in Norfolk, in which division the family held land”.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Adam de Blakeneye, which was dated 1273, in the “Hundred Rolls of London.” It was during the time of King Edward 1, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272 – 1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Blakeney settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 18th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Blakeney who settled in the United States in the 18th century included William Blakeney landed in North America in 1772.

Some of the individuals with the name Blakeney who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Harriet Blakeney at the age of 56, who landed in America from England, in 1892. Fanny Blakeney at the age of 39, who settled in America in 1896.

Some of the people with the name Blakeney who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Virginia Vaugh Blakeney at the age of 25, who transported to the United States, in 1907. William Blakeney at the age of 17, landed in America from Enniscrone, Ireland, in 1908. Marie Blakeney, at the age of 50 and Evelyn Annie Blakeney at the age of 19, both landed in America from Sliglass, Ireland in the same year in 1908. Frederick Blakeney at the age of 21, who moved to the United States from Gloucester, England, in 1909.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Blakeney who settled in the Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Chambers Blakeney, “Blakely” U.E. who settled in Canada near about 1783.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Blakeney: United States 4,532; England 382; Wales 45; Australia 577; Scotland 20; Canada 480; South Africa 91; Brazil 79; Ireland 49; Bermuda 28.

Notable People:

Allan Blakeney (1925–2011), was a Canadian leader.

Ben Bruce Blakeney (1908–1963), was an American advocate.

Edward Blakeney (1778–1868), was a British field organizer.

Frederick Blakeney (1913–1990), was an Australian representative.

Issac Blakeney (born 1992), was an American football player.

Michael Blakeney was a British and Australian professor.

Robert Blakeney (died 1733), was an Irish army officer for Athenry.

Theophilus Blakeney was an Irish military police officer for Athenry, fighter, and senior constable of the division Galway.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Lord Blakeney, as exemplified to Gen. Sir William Blarenet, K.B., created a Peer of Ireland, 1756, title extinct, 1761). Motto— Auxilium meum ab alto. Blazon: Sable a chevron ermine between three leopards' faces or. Crest—Out of clouds proper an arm erect vested azure the hand grasping a sword, both also proper. Supporters— Dexter, a soldier of the 27th foot affronte in full uniform and accoutrements, his right hand brandishing a sword, all proper; sinister, a leopard guard, proper murally crowned gules and semee of bomb shells fired, and resting his dexter hind paw on a bomb shell, also fired proper.

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References

  • 1 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
  • 4 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 5 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 6 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 7 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 8 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 9 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
  • 10 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
  • 11 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
  • 12 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 13 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 14 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
  • 15 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
  • 16 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302