Board Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Board Family Coat of Arms

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Board Coat of Arms Meaning

Board Name Origin & History

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Board Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Board blazon are the marlets and escutheon. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, azure and argent .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

The escutcheon simply represents smaller shield shapes included within the shield, and its close relative, the inescutcheon is just a larger version occupying most of the field. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escutcheon There is no particular significance that can accorded to the escutcheon itself, but attention should be paid to the colour and devices that are borne upon it. The escutcheon may also be added to an existing coat of arms either as recognition of some additional honour (an escutcheon of augmentation”) or in the case where arms that are already quartered are to be combined an escutcheon with the new arms may be placed overall (an ”escutcheon of pretence”). 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 126 & 141

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Board Name

Board Origin:

England, France

Origins of Board:

According to the early recordings of the spellings of the name, this surname is listed in various spelling types such as Board, Boards, Boardman, Border, Boord, Borde, Laborde, Bordes, Bordas, Bordis, Bourdel, and many more. It is a surname which is probably from Olde English or French origins. If the first, it acquires from the early 7th Century word “bord,” which means a piece of wood. So, it was a professional name for a maker of timber, boards, and pieces of wood, the latter would have acquired from the word “bordure,” a word which expressed the border of a hamlet or from the word “borde,” which means a small house of wood standing separately. The “s” was added to a geographical name, to expresse “a resident or occupant at (that area).” Previous examples of the name listing consist of Robert Bourde in the premium Rolls of Somerset, dated 1323, Anne Bordish, who married Roger Willson at the parish of St Katherines by the Tower of London in December 1609. Jeanne La Borde, who married Jean Siot at Montaut, Basses-Pyrenees, in July 1634, Pierre Bordes, a French Huguenot foreigner, whose son Pierre named at the French parish, Glasshouse Street, in the city of London, in February 1727, and William Bordis, whose son William named at Endell Street existing in Hospital, Holborn, in August 1776.

Variations:

More common variations are: Boyard, Boward, Bouard, Boarde, Boardo, Boarda,Boeard, Boardt, Bard, Bord.

England:

The origins of the surname Board found in Sussex, where people held a family seat from early times, before the invasion of the Normans at Hastings in 1066

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Nicholas Borde, dated about 1230, in the “pipe rolls ” of the division of Dorset. It was during the time of King Henry III of England who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during that time became a basic requirement for the development of personal taxation. It came to be known as census Tax in England. Surnames all over the country started to develop, with uncommon and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Board had left for Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Board settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Board who settled in the United States in the 17th century included George Board, John Board, and Jacob Board, all arrived in Virginia respectively in the years 1639, 1643 and 1663.

Some of the people with the surname Board who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Richard Board and John Board; both arrived in Virginia respectively in the years 1705 and 1774.

The following century saw much more Board surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Board who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Jan VanDen Board landed in Lowa in the year 1848.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Board who settled in Australia in the 19th century included John Board, Septimus Board, and Alexander Board arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Enterprise” in the same year 1840. George Board who was an English prisoner from Somerset, who transferred aboard the ship “Argyle” in March 1831, arriving in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. James Board, an English prisoner from Dorset, Andromeda” in November 1832, who shifted aboard the ship “Andromeda” in November 1832, coming in New South Wales, Australia.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Board who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included George Board at the age of 26, Ann Board at the age of 30 and Tom Board at the age of 11, all arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Clifton” in the same year 1842.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Board: United States 4,580; England 1,898; Australia 834; Canada 298; South Africa 237; Wales 327; Pakistan 1,132; Brazil 254; India 238; Kenya 471.

Notable People:

Mykel Board was born in January in the year 1950. He is an American scholar and singer, especially famous for his articles in “Maximumrocknroll”.

Board Family Gift Ideas

Browse Board family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Bordhlll, co. Sussex, and Linfield). Blazon: Per fesse gules and azure an escutcheon within an orle of martlets argent.
Notes: (Farley House, Westerham). Perforatus. Blazon: Per fesse gules and azure an escutcheon within an orle of martlets argent. Crest—An antelope statant or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escutcheon
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 126 & 141