Borghese Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Borghese Family Coat of Arms

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Borghese Coat of Arms Meaning

Borghese Name Origin & History

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Borghese Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Borghese blazon are the dragon, wings and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, azure and gules .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.6The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Dragons have a long history in Heraldry and indeed have come to symbolise entire countries. Originally they were perhaps based on garbled descriptions of crocodiles given by returning travellers but soon developed a widely accepted representation. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin Wade suggests that their appearance signifies “a most valiant defender of treasure”, a trait of dragons that we are still familiar with today. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P86

Wings are frequently observed in coats of arms. Unless otherwise specified they should be shown as eagle’s wings, with a realistic appearance. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wing They can appear singly or in pairs, in which form they are very often found in the crest, which rests above the shield in a full achievement of arms. Wade, quoting Quillim, suggests that the use of the wing on the shield signifies “celerity and protection or covering”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P73

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 16A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Borghese Name

Borghese Origin:

England, France

Origins of Borghese:

According to the early recordings of the spelling of the name, this interesting and unique name was listed in many forms including Bourges, Bourgaize, Bourgeois, (France), Burgess, Burges and Burgis (England and Scotland), Borghese, Borgesio and Burgisi (Italy), and others, this interesting surname is of pre 8th century Old French origins. It acquires from the word “burgeis”, which means inhabitant and freeman of a protected town, one which could apply municipal rates, taxes, and duties. A burgeis generally had tenure of land or buildings from a landlord by “burgage”, which involved the payment of a fixed money rent. In Scotland, the position of burgess required not only the making of payments, but to be available to take part in guarding the town. The surname is one of the earliest noted anywhere in the world. These recordings are from England because this country was the first to pick both hereditary surnames and to make the necessary records in which to list them. France was many centuries later, and Italy, not until the 19th century in most areas. Early records showing the influence of the Norman-French in England after the Conquest of 1066 include as Ralph le Burgeis, in the Pipe Rolls of the division of Sussex in 1195, and Philip Bourges in the cartulary of Oseney Abbey, Oxford in 1197.

Variations:

More common variations are: Bhorghese, Borghes, Borghesi, Barghese, Borghise, Berghese, Borghess, Bourghes, Borghose, Borghs.

England:

The surname Borghese first appeared in Brittany, where the family first started and maintained their status as one of the most important families of the region.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Geoffrey Burgeis, dated about 1115, in the “Winton Rolls,” of Hampshire. It was during the time of King Henry 1st, who was known to be the “The Lion of Justice,” dated 1100-1135. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Borghese had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

The distinguished family name Borghese has made significant contributions to the culture, arts, sciences and religion of France and New France. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name Borghese were Jeanne Trahan, who settled in Acadia in 1636. Marguerite Bourgeoys, 33, who arrived in Montreal in 1653, another Marguerite Bourgeoys, who settled in Montreal in 1659.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Borghese: Italy 2,083; United States 431; France 380; Argentina 314; Canada 110; Brazil 95; England 38; Belgium 30; Australia 11; Spain 8.

Notable People:

Prince Lorenzo Borghese (born June 1972) is an Italian-American businessman, television personality, and member of the famous noble Borghese family. Besides being a cosmetics businessperson and animal advocate, Borghese was a featured bachelor on the ninth season of ABC’s The Bachelor. He is the son of Prince Francesco Marco Luigi Costanzo Borghese (born 1938) and his American wife, Amanda Leigh. Borghese’s paternal grandmother was Princess Marcella Borghese, who founded the Borghese cosmetics line in 1958.

Junio Valerio Scipione Ghezzo Marcantonio Maria Borghese (June 1906 –August 1974), nicknamed The Black Prince, was an Italian Navy commander during the regime of Benito Mussolini’s National Fascist Party and an outstanding hard-line fascist politician in post-war Italy. In 1970, he took part in the planning of a neofascist coup (dubbed the Golpe Borghese) that called off after the press discovered it. He subsequently fled to Spain and spent the last years of his life there.

Borghese Family Gift Ideas

Browse Borghese family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Italie (Comtes bavarois, 17 juin 1693; princes, 18 juillet 1769) D'azur à un dragon ailé d'or; au chef du même, ch. d'une aigle de sa., bq., m. et cour. d’or. English: Azure, a winged dragon or, a chief of the same charged with an eagle sable, beaked, legged and crowned or.
2) Borghese-Bichi. Italie. Ec au 1 d’or au vol de gu; aux 2 et 3 d’azur à un dragon ailé d’or; au 4 de gu. à tête de lion d’or. English: Quarterly 1st or a pair of wings gules 2nd & 3rd azure a winged dragon(*) or 4th gules the head of a lion or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P86
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wing
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P73
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
16. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60