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Origin, Meaning, Family History and Borne Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Borne Origin:

England, Germany

Origins of Borne:

Listed in many spelling forms containing as Born, Bourn, Borne, and the professional word Borner. It is an English surname. It has two possible origins. The first is regional from one of the many areas named as Born or Bourn, or it was geographical and pre 7th century Olde English, and mentioned a person who resided or in the situation of Borner worked "atte burna." While "burna" means a small river or water source, it was also a term which was used to describe a water source which was at the church or hamlet boundary limit. According to the early documentations one William atte Borne, of Somerset was recorded in 1327. Secondly, the surname may also be a pet name. In this situation, it acquired from the Olde French word "borgne" which means "one-eyed." The registers from this origin are very old and contain William le Borne in 1164 and Waltere le Borne of 1185, in the Premium Rolls of the division of Dorset. These recordings find as related to that of Simon Monoculus, from the Latin mono which means one, and Oculus - an eye.

Variations:

More common variations are: Bourne, Boorne, Buorne, Boarne, Borney, Beorne, Bowrne, Boyrne, Borneo, Bornea.

England:

The surname Borne first appeared in Lincolnshire at Bourne, a market town and local church in the South Kesteven division which is sometimes back to the Domesday Book where it was recorded as Brune. The place name was acquired from the Old English word burna or perhaps the Old Scandinavian word brunnr. The Bourn mentioned above in South Cambridgeshire was also seen in the Domesday Book where it was recorded at that time as Brune. It has the same source. Bourne Abbey is in Bourne; Lincolnshire dates back to before Domesday Book in 1086. At that time, it recorded as "half a parish" and had a clergyman. In other words, it was a small parish but standards of those days.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Borne had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Borne settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the individuals with the name Borne who landed in the United States in the 17th century included David Borne arrived in Virginia as early as 1620. Richard Borne, aged 24, arrived in Barbados in 1634. Tho Borne, aged 22, landed in Barbados or St Christopher in 1634. Marmaduke Borne, aged 21, landed in St Christopher in 1635. William Borne, who arrived in Virginia in 1642.

People with the surname Borne who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Jacob Borne sailed into port at New York, NY between the years of 1710 and 1714. Joseph Borne, who landed in Virginia in 1717. Ludwick Borne, aged 32, arrived in Pennsylvania in 1737. Henry Borne, who arrived in Frederick County, Maryland in 1795.

The following century saw many more Borne surnames arrive. Some of the population with the surname Borne who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Carolina Borne, who came to America in 1844 at the age of 16. I Borne, aged 35, arrived in New Orleans, La in 1848.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Borne: United States 3,486; France 3,404; Mali 1,753; Brazil 413; Canada 350; England 220; South Africa 201; India 126; Chile 117; Spain 116.

Notable People:

Michel Borne (September 1784 – 1843 or later) was a businessman and politician in Eastern Canda. He supported Rimouski in the Legislative Assembly in Canada from the year 1841 to the year 1843.

Al Borne (December 1911, Chicago, Illinois - February 2000, Tarzana, California) was an American popular song writer, orchestra manager, music composer and musical director, who received his education from the University of Illinois.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: (Kent). Blazon: Erm. on a bend az. three lions pass. guard. or. Crest—A lion sejant or, collared az. resting his dexter paw on a pellet.
2) Notes: (Kent). Blazon: Erm. on a bend gu. three lions reguard. or.
3) Notes: (London and Berkshire). Blazon: Ar. a chev. betw. three lions ramp. gu. (another, the lions sa.) a chief erm.
4) Notes: (Worcestershire). Blazon: Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three lions ramp. sa. as many mascles or.
5) Notes: None. Blazon: Gu. a lion or, within a bordure engr. of the second.
6) Notes: None. Blazon: Ar. a chev. sa. surmounted of another erm. betw. three chaplets of roses gu. seeded or.
7) Notes: None. Blazon: Erm. a bend az.
8) Notes: None. Blazon: Gu. a lion ramp. or.
9) Notes: None. Blazon: Az. six legs couped per thigh ar. three, two, and one (another adds a bordure engr. or).

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References

  • 1 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
  • 4 The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
  • 5 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
  • 6 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 7 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
  • 8 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 9 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 10 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 11 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 12 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
  • 13 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
  • 14 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
  • 15 A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
  • 16 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
  • 17 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
  • 18 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
  • 19 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
  • 20 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 21 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 22 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45