Bradbury Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bradbury Family Coat of Arms

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Bradbury Coat of Arms Meaning

Bradbury Name Origin & History

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Bradbury Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Bradbury blazon are the chevron, buckle, eagle and tiger. The four main tinctures (colors) are ermine, sable, vert and or.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.14The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 17Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100 The buckle may fall into this category, it is present in a surprising number of different forms and has a long heritage in use, 18A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Buckle being considered honourable bearings and are said to “signify victorious fidelity in authority”. 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P115

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 20A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 21A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 22The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bradbury Name

BRADBURY:

Bradbury is a name of English origins that can be dated all the way back to the Middle Age. The word comes from ancient English: “Brydbyrig”, spacious town. As most of traditional names in that time, people got their last names from the places they were born. According to the records, the first one to sign using the surname was William of Bradbury around 1272. Three hundred years later, the name began to be more common according to marriage records in England. According to an 1840 census, there were around 219 families in the United States holding the name Bradbury, a number that increased all the way up to 1445 families in the 1920 census.

The name became quite common, mostly for William Bradbury, and can be found in countries such as the United States, England or Scotland. The Baron of Bradbury is a novelty title in the United Kingdom, underlining the importance of this surname among British peerage system. In a census from 1880, the most common occupation for a Bradbury was farming. By the time of the Civil War, there were Bradburys fighting on both sides: 75 under the Confederate flag and 232 reinforcing the Union. That fact shows that the majority of Bradbury immigrants stayed in the northern, more industrial States, while only a few of them tried to settle at southern regions.

Among some of the most famous Bradbury we can name:

Ray Bradbury: American science fiction writer. His most important works are: Farenheit 451, The Golden Apples of the Sun and The Illustrated Man. His works earned him a Pulitzer in 2007.

William Bradbury: English footballer who played for such teams as Port Vale, Scunthorpe United, Rochdale and Burton Town. As a half-back he played 116 games from 1903 until 1923 scouring 5 goals.

Randy Bradbury: American bass player and second vocalist for the punk-rock band Pennywise. He also played with the bands One Hit Wonder and The Falling Idols. He is considered a pioneer in Californian punk-rock.

Bradbury Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bradbury family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: (Augustus Beaty Bradbuby, Esq., of Edinburgh). Blazon: Ar. in base on a mount vert, a tiger pass. ppr. on a chief of the second, two tigers dormant also ppr. Crest—Betw. two ears of wheat or, a sword erect point downwards ppr. pendent from the hilt by a chain or, an escocheon ar. charged with a heart gu. Motto—Amicitia cum virtute.
2) Notes: (Essex and Suffolk). Blazon: Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three round buckles ar. the tongues hanging downwards. Crest— A boar’s head erect betw. two ostrich feathers ppr.
3) Notes: (Lancashire). Blazon: Sa. two chevronels or, betw. four buckles, three in chief and one in base ar. Crest—A demi wood-pigeon ar. the body fretty gu. and each wing charged with a buckle ar. Motto— Aequitas actionum regula.
4) Notes: (Derbyshire and London). Blazon: Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three buckles ar. a fleur-de-lis or, for diff. Crest—A demi dove, volant ar. fretty gu. holding in the beak a slip of barberry vert, fructed gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
14. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Buckle
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P115
20. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
21. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
22. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74