Brewer Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Brewer Family Coat of Arms

Variations of this name are: Bruer.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Brewer. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Brewer Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Brewer blazon are the bend wavy, mermaid, lion and axe. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. It can be further distinguished by embellishing the edges. The decorative edge pattern Wavy, sometimes written as undy is, for obvious reasons, associated with both water and the sea 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40. Indeed, a roundel with alternating bars of azure and argent (blue and white) is known by the shorthand term fountain, representing water at the bottom of a well 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water. Other colours have also been used and the result can be very pleasing to the eye.

The mermaid is depicted exactly as we now picture the mythical creature, and is almost always shown with dishevelled hair and looking into a hand mirror. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mermaid They tend to more frequent as supporters than being illustrated upon the shield itself. Wade cites Sloane Evans in his belief that the mermaid represents the “Eloquence” of the bearer.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 16A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Brewer Name

Brewer Origin:

England, Germany

Origins of Name:

The surname of Brewer has two possible origins, each coming with a history and a distinct derivative. The first of these possible origins is that the surname of Brewer is an Anglo-Saxon, occupational name for a brewer of beer or ale. This possible occupational origin comes from the Old English Pre 7th Century word “breowan” which can be translated to mean “to brew” which twisted and evolved into the Middle English term “brewere.” In modern times, the surname of Brewster has multiple derivations, but the adding of the medieval suffix “-ster” denotes that this surname was at one time a feminine name, although this medieval suffix began to apply to both genders in the middle of the 13th Century. The second possible origin of the surname of Brewer is a locational surname. Locational surnames were given to the Lord of a given land, as well as the people who lived there. More commonly, this surname was given to someone who migrated out of this land, looking for work, and was most easily identified by the name of their birthplace. It is recorded as being a locational surname from the Normans, and was used to describe someone who lived on or near a place where heather grew. This locational surname derives from the Old French word of “bruyere” which can be translated to mean “heather.”

Variations:

More common variations are:

Brewery, Bruewer, Breuwer, Breweur, Brewwer, Brewerr, Brewere, Brewuer, Brewyer, Brewster

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Brewer was in the country of England in the year of 1086. The person who was named Ralph de Brueria was recorded and mentioned in the Doomsday Book of Devonshire in the year 1086. The Doomsday Book was said to be a “Great Survey” of England, covering a various range of topics and including all recorded names. The Doomsday Book was ordered and decreed by one King William I, who was known as and commonly referred to throughout history as “William the Conqueror, and who ruled from the year 1066 to the year 1087. Those who lived in England and bore the surname of Brewer can be found in the southwestern peninsula of England, and within the city of London.

United States of America:

During the European Migration, many English settlers were displeased with their living situation, and moved to the United States of America, searching for a better life. The first person who bore the surname of Brewer and landed in the United States of America, was one William Brewer, who arrived in the United States of America in the year 1620. Today, those who bear the surname of Brewer are found throughout the United States of America. Specifically, those who bear this surname can be found in the eastern half of the country, and in California and Texas.

Brewer Today:

United States 114,431

England 10,228

Canada 4,454

Australia 4,031

South Africa 1,699

Liberia 1,377

New Zealand 1,001

Wales 643

Scotland 538

Venezuela 527

Notable People:

Contessa Brewer (born in 1974) who was a host from the MSNBC weekend program Caught on Camera and was from America

Donald George “Don” Brewer (born in 1948) who was a drummer and co-lead singer for the rock band called Grand Funk Railroad and was from America

James Thomas “Jim” Brewer (1937-1987) who was a MLB relief pitcher who played from the year 1960 to the year 1976, who was from America

David Josiah Brewer (1837-1910) who was a jurist and an Associate Justice of of the US Supreme Court from the year 1889 to the year 1910

Gay Robert Brewer Jr. (1932-2007) who was a professional PGA golfer who was the winner of the 1976 Master’s Tournament

William Henry Brewer 91828-1910) who was a botanist, and the first Chair of Agriculture at the Yale University’s Sheffield Scientific School who was from America

Major-General Carlos Brewer (1890-1976) who was a Commanding Officer at the Heidelberg Area Command from the year 1946 to the year 1947

George Keefer Brewer (1914-1959) who was most notably known by his stage name of George Reeves, who was an American actor who was best known for his role as Superman in the 1950’s TV series

Eric A. Brewer who was a professor of computer science at the University of California at Berkeley

Samuel Brewer, who was a Member of the Connecticut State House of Representatives from East Hartford in the years 1831, the year 1833, and the year 1835

Brewer Family Gift Ideas

Browse Brewer family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Devonshire). Gu. two bends wavy, the first ar. the second or. Crest—A mermaid with mirror and comb ppr.
2) (Kent). Gu. two bends wavy or, a canton vair. Crest—Out of a mural coronet a hand and arm couped at the elbow, habited gu. billettee or, holding in the hand ppr. a battle-axe ar.
3) (London and Somersetshire. Her Coll. London). Gu. two bends wavy or, a chief vair, a mullet for diff. Crest—A syren (charged with a mullet for diff.) her human part ppr. her tail scaled or and gu. divided by parallel lines wavy.
4) (Bermondsey, and Norfolk). The same, without the mullet.
5) Ar. a lion ramp. tail forchee gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mermaid
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
16. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60