Bridgewater Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bridgewater Family Coat of Arms

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Bridgewater Coat of Arms Meaning

Bridgewater Name Origin & History

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Bridgewater Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Bridgewater blazon are the eagle, fleur-de-lis and stag. The four main tinctures (colors) are sable, azure, or and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

We should be surprised to find the stag or buck, noble quarry of many a mediaeval hunt, being illustrated in many a coat of arms. 17Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69. It shares many of the poses to be found with the lion, but also one almost unique to the deer, grazing, as if the animal is still unaware of the hunter’s approach. 18A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer. In common with all symbols related to the hunt we probably need look further for their intended meaning than the pleasure taken by the holder in such pursuits! 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bridgewater Name

Bridgewater Origin:

England

Origin of Bridgewater:

This name is of English origin and is a locational name from an area in Somerset named as Bridgewater. Listed as Brugie in the Domesday Book of 1086 and as Brigewaltier in the 1194 Pipe Rolls of that division, the first component acquires from the Olde English pre 7th Century word ‘Brycg,’ which means the Bridge or overpass. The second component is the particular name Walter, so the whole meaning of the word is ‘Walters Bridge or overpass.’ Walter de Dowai was a 12th Century landowner of the area. Such habitational names are given as surnames for recognition of old residents who moved about freely from their community or hamlet of origin. In May 1614 William Bridgewater married Dorothy Ulster in St. Margaret’s, Lothbury, London and in April 1682 John Bridgewater married Elizabeth Browne in St. Katherine by the Tower, London, John Egerton (1579 – 1649) developed first Earl lord of Bridgewater in 1617.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Bridge Water, Bridgewaeter, Bridgewatter, Bridgewawter, Bridgewter, Pridgewater, Brodgewater, Bridgewiter, Bridgewotter,

England:

The name Bridgewater first organized in Somerset where they held a family seat from ancient times; some say well before the Norman Invasion and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Marmaduke Bridgewater who married Marye Woodman, who dated in June 1559, at St. Stephen’s Coleman Street, London. It was during the time of Queen Elizabeth I, who was known to be the “Good Queen Bess,” dated 1558 – 1603.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bridgewater settled in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th. Some of the people with the name Bridgewater who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Richard Bridgewater, who landed in Virginia in 1623. Christopher Bridgewater, who arrived in Maryland in 1670.

Some of the people with the name Bridgewater who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Robert Bridgewater settled in Virginia in 1730.

Some of the people with the name Bridgewater who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Elisha Bridgewater, at the age of 41, who emigrated to the United States from Dudley in 1899.

Some of the people with the name Bridgewater who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Harry Hubert Bridgewater at the age of 36, who emigrated to America from Birmingham, in 1903. Mary C. Bridgewater at the age of 48, who settled in America from Nassau, in 1903. Marie Bridgewater at the age of 2, who landed in America from Dudley, England, in 1909. George W. Bridgewater at the age of 23, who landed in America from Leicester, England, in 1909. Herbert W. Bridgewater at the age of 57, who landed in America from Drighton, England, in 1911.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bridgewater: United States 4,436; England 1,387; The Bahamas 1,387; Canada 247; Australia 214; Trinidad and Tobago 157; Saint Kitts and Nevis 95; Wales 79; Guyana 44; Antigua and Barbuda 41.

Notable People:

Bradley Michael Bridgewater was born in March 1973. He is an American competition swimmer who received the gold medal in the men’s 200-meter backstroke at the 1996 Olympics.

Dee Dee Bridgewater was born in 1950. She is an American jazz musician. She also got a reward for outstanding singer and composer, as well as a Tony Award for National Public Radio’s organized radio show JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater.

Cecil Bridgewater was born in 1942. He is an American jazz singer and writer.

John Bridgewater (1532 –1596), is an English accounting professor.

Teddy Bridgewater (born 1992), was an American football player for the Minnesota Vikings in the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Vikings in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft. He played college football at the University of Louisville.

Bridgewater Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bridgewater family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: None. Blazon: Argent an eagle displayed sable on a chief azure three fleurs-de-lis or. Crest—A demi stag or, attired sable.
2) Notes: None. Blazon: Sable an eagle displayed argent a chief of the last.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30