Briggs Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Briggs Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Briggs. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

briggs coat of arms

Briggs Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Briggs blazon are the pheon, bend, cinquefoil and crescent. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and gules.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

Briggs Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Briggs Name

Briggs Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Briggs has two possible origins, and is found as a derivative of the surname of Bridges. The first origin of the surname of Briggs is from the country of England, where it was seen as a topographical surname. Topographical surnames are given to those who live on or near a certain man-made or natural phenomena that was found in the land. In this case, the topographical location was that of a bridge. This was used in the surname of Briggs, as well as the variants of this surname, which are Bridges, or Brydges. This surname of Briggs in the topographical and occupational sense was used for someone who lived near a bridge, or someone who was a bridge keeper. In the Middle Ages, maintaining a bridge was one of the more common feudal occupations. This derives from the Middle English word “brigge” which comes from the Old English Pre 7th Century “Brycg” both of which can be translated to mean the word “bridge.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Brigges, Briggss, Briggis, Briggsa, Briaggs, Briggus, Briiggs, Braiggs, Briggsw, Brigs, Brigg, Brig, Bridge

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Briggs was found in the country of England in the year of 1205. This person, who was recorded as being named one William de Bruges, was mentioned in the document referred to as the Curia Regis Rolls of Oxfordshire. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King John of England. King John of England was also known as, and commonly referred to throughout history as the “Lackland,” and he ruled from the year of 1199 to the year of 1216. Other mentions of this surname of Briggs in England include Henry Briggs, who lived from the year 1561 to the year 1630, and was a Professor of Astronomy, who published many of the early books of astral navigation. Those who carried the surname of Briggs can be found in the county of Cumberland, and generally spread to be found in high concentrations in the county of Lancashire.

Scotland:

Those who bear the surname of Briggs in the country of Scotland can be found in the county of Aberdeenshire, and were commonly referred to as “the bricklayers.”

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th Century, a period of time known as the European Migration began throughout Europe, though mostly centered in England. This migration was when the settlers determined that they no longer were happy with their homeland, and sought out a new place to live, one promising new freedoms and capabilities that were not afforded to them in the land of their birth. The United States of America, which at that time was called The New World or The Colonies, promised these freedoms to new settlers, and thus was a popular destination during this time for those settlers. The first person who was recorded to bear the surname of Briggs was one Clement Briggs who landed in Plymouth, Massachusetts in the year 1621. Those who have this surname are in the states of Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Michigan, California and the state of Maine.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Briggs:

United States 66,858, Nigeria 34,235, England 18,859, Australia 7,871, Canada 4,150, South Africa 2,630, Scotland 1,339, New Zealand 1,105, Brazil 715, Ghana 559

Notable People:

James Frankland Briggs (1827-1905) who was a U.S. Representative from New Hampshire from the year 1877 to the year 1883, and who was a politician from America

Frank Parks Briggs (1894-1992) who was a United States Senator from Missouri from 1945 to 1947, and who was a politician from America

Frank Obadiah Briggs (1851-1913) who was a United States Senator from New Jersey from the year 1907 to the year 1913, and who was a politician from America

Frank A. Briggs (1858-1898) who was the 5th Governor of North Dakota in the year 1897 to the year 1898, and who was a Republican politician from America

Clare A. Briggs (1875-1930) who was an early comic strip artist, who was best known for his comic A. Piker Clerk, which was created in 1904, and his later comic strip Danny Dreamer, which was regularly published in the Chicago Sunday Tribune

Charles Frederick “C.F.” Briggs (1804-1877) who was a journalist, author, and editor who was from America

William John “Bill” Briggs (born in 1943) who was an NFL football defensive end for the Washington Redskins from the year 1966 to the year 1967

Briggs Family Gift Ideas

Browse Briggs family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More briggs Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Halifax and Birstwith Hall, co. York). Motto—Fortiter et fideliter. Ar. a bend vair betw. three escutcheons sa. each charged with a pheon of the field, a bordure engr. gu. bezantee. Crest—A mount vert, thereon, in front of a lion pass. erm. the dexter paw resting upon a pheon sa. a laurel branch erect ppr.
2) (Catherington House, co. Hants). Ar. on an inscutcheon gu. a bend vair betw. two cinquefoils or, a border engr. az. bezantee. Crest—On a stump of a tree eradicated or, sprouting vert a pelican of the first vulning herself ppr.
3) (Haughton, co. Salop, originally of Saul, co. Norfolk. Sir Moreton Brigges. of Haughton, was created a baronet in 1641, extinct 1767). Motto—Virtus est Dei. Gu. three bars gemelles or, a canton erm. Crest—As preceding.
4) (Bart, of Briggs-Dayrell, Island of Barbados, created 1871). Mottoes—Under the Arms: Ne traverse par le pont; over the Crest: Virtus est Dei. Ar. three bars gemelles az. on a canton of the last, a bridge of the first. Crest—Upon the stump of a tree erased and couped, and charged with a trefoil ppr. a pelican vulning herself wings elevated ar.
5) (Brecknockshire). Ar. three esutcheons gu. each charged with a bend of the field. Crest—An arm vambraced, and hand holding a bow and arrow ppr.
6) (London and Shropshire). Ar. three inescutcheons gu. each charged with a bend vair. Crest—On the stump of a tree, erased and couped or, sprouting two new branches vert, a pelican gold, vulning her breast gu.
7) (Haughton, co. Salop). Gu. three (another, two) bars gemelles or, on a canton sa. a crescent of the second. Crest—An arm embowed, covered with leaves vert, holding in the hand ppr. a bow gu. strung sa. and an arrow ar.
8) Quarterly, or and gu. a canton sa.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil