Broad Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Broad Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Broad. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

broad coat of arms

Broad Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Broad blazon are the savage, lozenge and pale. The two main tinctures (colors) are argent and sable.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Heraldry is a human art, by and for people and it is not surprising that people themselves are frequently depicted in arms 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174. As well as the nobility themselves, we also see both the mundane, ploughmen, fishermen and reapers; and the exotic in the form of club wielding savagesand the Moorish or Saracen gentleman with his decorative wreathed turban 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the lozenge Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. It can appear on its own, voided (with the background visible through the middle), and can also be conjoined, whereby adjacent lozenges touch point-to-point. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge Guillim groups the lozenge with all square shapes as being symbolic of “verity, probity, constancy and equity”. 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262

The Pale is one of the major, so called ordinaries, significant objects that extend across the entire field of the shield. The pale being a broad vertical band up the centre of the shield 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale. In origin, the word probably has its roots in the same place as palisade, a defensive wall made of closely space upright timbers. Indeed, it is possible that the original “pales” arose where a wooden shield was constructed of vertical planks painted in different hues 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1. This is perhaps why Wade, a writer on Heraldic Symbology suggested that denotes “military strength and fortitude” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47.

Broad Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Broad Name

Broad Origin:

England

Origins of Broad:

This uncommon name is of 8th-century Anglo-Saxon origin and is an example of a large group of old surnames that formed from the continual use of nicknames. These were related to a variety of qualities like a person’s mental and moral attributes, physical characteristics, an imagined likeness to an animal’s or bird’s appearance, or to a style of dressing or profession. In this situation, the nickname acquires from the Olde English pre 7th Century “brad,” which means vast, wide, in Middle English “brode,” and given to a person believed to be large or fat. So, the whole meanings of the name are a large person. There is also a new surname appeared as Brading, showing that there was an Old English particular name, “Brada,” in Middle English “Brade,” which may also be a means of the surname Broad. In some examples, the name may be geographical in origin, showing residence “at the broad,” a vast place, as in the new term “the Norfolk Broads.” Stephen Bradde noted in the Hundred Rolls of Nolk in 1275, and Gilbert le Brode in the Essex ‘Feet of Fines’ rolls of 1235.

Variations:

More common variations are: Broady, Broade, Broiad, Byroad, Broadt, Broyad, Broadd, Broadw, Broadi, Broaud.

England:

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John le Brade, dated about 1212, in the “Curia Rolls of Kent.” It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199-1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varietions of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Broad landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Broad who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Tho Broad and Thomazin Broad, both landed in Virginia in 1635.

People with the surname Broad who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Francis Broad, who arrived in New England in 1730.

The following century saw much more Broad surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Broad who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Benjamin Broad, who landed in Mississippi in 1903.

Canada:

People with the surname Broad who settled in Canada in the 19th century included John Broad, Isobel Broad, Michael Broad, James Broad and John Broad, all arrived in Quebec aboard the ship “Atlas” in the same year 1815.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Broad who landed in Australia in the 19th century included John Broad arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Cressy” in 1847. Martin Broad arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Duke of Bedford” in 1848. Henry T Broad arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Forfarshire” in 1848. Mary Broad arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Ramillies” in 1849.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Broad who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Charles Broad arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Alma” in 1857. Sarah Broad arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Alma” in 1857.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Broad: England 5,646; United States 2,465; Australia 2,306; Canada 1,201; New Zealand 781; South Africa 657; Wales 587; Germany 235; Scotland 230; Brazil 207.

Notable People:

Alfred Scott Broad (1854–1929) was a South Australian artist.

C. D. Broad was an English philosopher known for his thorough and objective analysis in works such as Scientific Thought (1930) and Examination of McTaggart’s Philosophy (1933).

Chris Broad was an old English cricket player and match referee.

Broad Family Gift Ideas

Browse Broad family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More broad Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Ar. a pale sa. in fesse three lozenges counterchanged. Crest—A demi savage holding in the dexter hand three arrows, and pointing with the sinister to an imperial crown.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47