Brock Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Brock Family Coat of Arms

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Brock Coat of Arms Meaning

Brock Name Origin & History

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Brock Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Brock blazon are the bear, lure, lion passant and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and sable .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bear is more common in the arms of continental Europe than in British arms (possibly due to the lack of bears native to that country!), although the county of Warwickshire famously includes a bear in its arms. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bear Wade tells us that the bear is the “emblem of ferocity and the protection of kindred”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P63

The hawk’s lure is a training aid used with hunting hawks, depicted as a feathered ball on a short line. 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. Like all images relating to hunting it can largely be taken at face value, as being associated with armigers who enjoy the passions of the hunt.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Brock Name

Brock Origin:

England, Germany, France

Origins of Name:

The surname of Brock is of an Old French and an Anglo-Saxon origin, and there are three possible origins from which this surname is derived. The first possible origin of the surname of Brock is that it was a nickname for someone who looked like a badger. This origin of the surname derives from the Old English, Pre 7th Century word of “brocc” which can be translated to mean “a badger.” This nickname was used to describe both the physical characteristics of the person, but also could have been used to describe their personality. In this case, the surname of Brock could have been used to describe someone who was vexing or mischievous. The second origin of the surname of Brock is that it may hail from an Old French word. These two words it could have originated from, “broque” or “brocke”. They could also possibly have different meanings. “Young stag” is a possible definition for both or alternatively could also mean one who is young, enthusiastic, and full of life. The third possible origin of the surname of Brock is that it could have been a topographical surname from England, which was used to describe someone who lived by a stream. This derivative hails from the Old English word “broc” which can be translated to mean, “a brook” or “a stream.” Topographical surnames were used to describe someone who lived on or near a man-made or natural phenomenon found throughout the land.

Variations:

More common variations are: Broock, Brocke, Braock, Brocka, Broeck, Brocki, Brouck, Burock, Brocko, Borock

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Brock was found in the country of England in the year of 1222. This person, who was recorded to bear the name Joel le Broc, was mentioned and recorded in the document referred to as the Calendar of Patent Rolls of Essex. This document was ordered, written, and decreed under the reign of King Henry III, who was known as “The Frenchman” and ruled from the year of 1216 to the year 1272. Other mentions of the surname of Brock that were found in the country of England included Richard Brock, who was mentioned in the Subsidy Rolls of Worcestershire in the year 1275, and Daniel de Lisle Brock was the baliff of Guernsey and represented the interests of the island in London, and lived from the year 1762 to the year 1842. Those who bear the surname of England can be found in the southwest counties of Cornwall, Devon, Somerset, and into the country of Wales, as represented in the county of Glamorgan.

Scotland:

Those who bear the surname of Brock can be found in the lower central region of the country.

United States:

The European Migration was a movement of people from the European countries who left their homeland in search of a better life. Many of these people went to the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as The New World or The Colonies, because this new land promised the freedoms that they were so hoping for. Those who bear the surname of Brock can be found in Texas, Georgia, South Carolina, New York, Ohio, Missouri, Indiana, Kentucky, Alabama, Tennessee, Illinois and Missouri.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Brock: United States 69,706, England 5,394, Germany 5,178, Canada 2,711, Australia 2,419, Brazil 2,178, South Africa 1,575, Ghana 1,118, Scotland 604, Philipines 580

Notable People:

Brigadier-General Ronald Cornelius Brock (1815-1984) who was a Commanding Officer in the 65th Division of the Artillery from the year 1943 to the year 1945

William Emerson “Bill” Brock III (born in 1930) who was a politician from America. He was also a resident of Tennessee and became a U.S. Senator for the state from the year 1971 to the year 1977

William H. Brock (born in 1936) who was a Professor of Chemistry at the University of Leicester

Sir Russell Claude Brock (1903-1980) who was surgeon from England, and was known as the Lord Brock of Wimbledon, and who was a pioneer of the open-heart surgery

Charles Edmund Brock (1870-1938) who was a line artist from England, and a book illustrator

Tony Brock (born in 1954) who was a British drummer

Sir Thomas Brock (1847-1922) who was a British sculptor who created the Queen Victoria Monument. The sculpture was placed in front of Buckingham Palace

Sir Isaac Brock (1769-1812) who was killed in the Battle of Queentston Heights, Niagara Falls. He was the Major-Geneneral and administrator in the army.

Peter Brock (1945-2006) who was a motor racing driver who was from Australia

Edwin Brock (1927-1997) who was a poet from Britain

Brock Family Gift Ideas

Browse Brock family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Cheshire, granted 3 Sept., 1580). Sa. a fesse humettee, betw. three bears’ heads erased ar.
2) (Saltwood, co. Kent). Ar. on a bend sa. a lure or.
3) (Guernsey). Gu. a fleur-de-lis ar., on a chief of the second a lion pass. guard. of the first. Crest—An escallop or.
4) (granted to Sir Isaac Brock, of Guernsey, 15 Feb., 1813). Gu. an eagle displ. or, on a chief embattled ar. a lion pass. guard. of the field. Crest—Out of a mural crown ar. a demi Canadian Indian, the dexter hand supporting a tomahawk erect ppr. Motto—Canada. Supporters— Dexter, a grenadier of the 49th regiment of foot; sinister, a soldier of the same, both armed and habited ppr.
5) Az. a fieur-de-lis or, on a chief ar. a lion pass.
6) Ar. on a chev. engr. betw. three boars’ heads couped sa. an. annulet or.
7) Ar. three brocks ppr.
8) Chequy ar. and sa.
9) (Clutton-Brock, Pensax Court, co. Worcester. Thomas Henry Clotton-Brock, Esq., of Pensax, was son of Col. Thomas Clutton, Worcester Militia, who took the additional name and arms of Brock in 1809). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu., three trefoils, slipped, or; on a chief, ar., a lion, pass. guard. of the field, for Brock; 2nd and 3rd, ar., a chev. erm. between three annulets gu., for Clutton. Crest—A demi lion, guard., gu., on the body a chev. or, charged with three trefoils slipped vert holding betw. his paws an arrow gold, barbed and feathered ar., for Brock; an owl on a myrtle branch, ppr., for Clutton.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bear
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P63
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61