Broker Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Broker Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Broker. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Broker Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Broker blazon are the talbot and escallop. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and azure .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Many breeds of dog appear in coats of arms, reflecting their status as man’s closet companion. The talbot is a hunting dog akin to a terrier, and usually illustrated in a lifelike style and eager pose. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog In common with the other heraldic dogs, Wade suggests that their presence should suggest “courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68 Others might say we need look no further than a pleasure in the hunt and the affection for this sturdy breed.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Broker Name

Broker Origin:

England, Ireland, Scotland

Origins of Broker:

According to the early recordings of the spelling forms of the name, this interesting and unique name listed in the spellings of Broke, de Broke, Brook, Brooke, Brookes, Brooker, Brooking, Brookman, Brooks (England, Scotland, Ireland), Brok, Broeck, Ten Broek, Van den Broek (Dutch, Flemish), Brook, Broker, Broek, von Brook (Germany) and others, this surname in its various spellings has to be described as “European”. It has noted from the earliest times in Britain, The Netherlands, Belgium, and Germany, and if it has a reliable source, it is possible that country. Wherever found, it can be locational from places called Brook(e), or geographical and show a person who resided by the water of some sort. It may have been a waterfall or a water source, but equally could have been a water pasture or lake which flooded in winter. Professionally, the name may have described a person who gave fresh water in a container known as a brok or broc. In Germany, the surname is sometimes introduced by the aristocratic “von,” showing ownership of an estate called Brook. In England, the name as Brooke spread widely, but as Brook was originally peculiar to the West Riding of Yorkshire. In Scotland, the name has been “resident” in Aberdeenshire since at least 1483, while in Ireland, it especially related to the province of Ulster. The surname is one of the earliest noted anywhere in the world, and early examples contain as William de la Broke of the division of Surrey, England, in 1208, and Johan Broker of Kiel, Germany, in 1367. In Scotland, Thomas Bruke was a burgess of Aberdeen in 1488. Later records include William Brook, of Rothwell, Yorkshire, in 1540, Johan Gerd Brook of Oerlinshausen in 1731, and Johann von Brook, originally of Bremen, noted in Isensee, Hannover, Germany, in March 1827.

Variations:

More common variations are: Brooker, Brocker, Boroker, Broeker, Buroker, Brouker, Brokker, Broaker, Baroker, Browker.

England:

The surname Broker first appeared in Middlesex, where they held a family seat from the Middle Ages.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ralph Broc, dated about 1119, in the “Pipe Rolls of the town of Colchester,” Essex. It was during the time of King Henry I who was known to be the “The Lion of Justice,” dated 1100 – 1135. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname broker had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname broker landed in the United States in the 19th century. Some of the people with the name broker who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included John Broker who arrived in Philadelphia in the year 1821. Clara Broker at the age of 22, landed in New Orleans, La in the year 1845. John H Broker at the age of 40, landed in New Orleans, La in the year 1845. Flor Broker at the age of 50, arrived in New Orleans, La in the same year 1845. Heinr W Broker, who came to America in 1849.

Here is the population distribution of the last name broker: Philippines 1,740; Germany 1,648; United States 1,394; Vietnam 1,391; Pakistan 1,132; Egypt 715; Mexico 602; Romania 522;; Italy 515; Brazil 493.

Broker Family Gift Ideas

Browse Broker family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Kent). Gu. on a chev. ar. three talbots pass. sa.
2) (Okely, co. Northampton). Or, on a fesse az. three escallops of the first. Crest—A demi sea-horse or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91