Broom Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Broom Family Coat of Arms

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Broom Coat of Arms Meaning

Broom Name Origin & History

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Broom Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Broom blazon are the cockatrice , chevron and sprigs of broom. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, sable and argent .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Nowadays we might conflate many mythical creatures under the heading of dragon but to the heraldic artists there was a whole menagerie of quite distinct beasts, the cockatrice or basilisk being one of them. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cockatrice Whilst both the dragon and cocaktrice are winged and scaled, the cocaktrice stands on two legs rather than four. Given the reputation of the basilisk we should not be surprised to find its meaning ascribed as representing “terror to all beholders”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P86

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.12The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The Sprig of broom is one of the many items found in the natural world that appear in coats of arms. It is one of several varities of bush and small plants frequently found in the hedgerows beside fields that can be seen. 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P270. In truth, the exact species of tree that brought forth a leaf or branch that is borne on a shield might only be visible on very close inspection – it is likely that the name of tree reflects something of the name of the holder rather than any meaning specific to the plant. 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100 We should not be suprised to find that for example, a family called BROOMHILL might chose as their arms a sprig of broom placed on a hill!

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Broom Name

Broom Origin:

England

Origin of Broom:

The origin of this name originally evolved from Anglo-Saxon and is a locational or geological surname. According to the history, it was acquired from any one of the different places known as Broom ( in Bedfordshire, Durham, and Worcestershire), Broome (in Norfolk, Shropshire, and Warwickshire), and Brome, in Suffolk. Most of the regions listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 in the form of “Brume” or “Brom” and all convey similar meanings and foundation from the Ancient English pre the 7th Century word “brom”, which means (region of) broom gorse. As a geological surname Broome, Broom or Brome represents the region where broom flourished. Roger Broome was the first traveler to the New World, leaving London on the “Truelove” in September 1635 obligated for new England. The naming of Thomas Broom listed at All Hallows, Honey Lane, London, in January 1618.

Variations:

More common variations are: Broome, Broohm, Baroom, Broomi, Boroom, Brooma, Brom, Barhoom, Boroomi, Byrom.

England:

The surname Broom was found in Kent where Eustace de la Brome was recorded in the Hundred Year Rolls of 1273. The same poll records William de Broom and Henry Brom in Norfolk. In the period of King Edward III (1312 – 1377), lists of the name organized in Somerset: Nicholas Brome and William Brome. One more early branch of the family was found in the church of Holton in Oxfordshire. In the church document, it listed the wedding of Ireton to Bridget, daughter of Oliver Cromwell, which occurred in June 1646, in the manor-house of the Whorwood family, to whom the lands transmitted by the wedding with the recipient being George Brome.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert de Brome, dated 1193, in the Pipe Rolls of Leicestershire. It was during the time of King Richard I who was known to be the “Lionheart,” 1189 – 1199. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Broom settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Broom who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Margaret Broom, who arrived in Maryland in 1652, Daniel Broom settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1683 and Daniel Broom, who arrived in Pennsylvania in the same year 1683.

Some of the people with the surname Broom who settled in the United States in the 18th century included John Broom landed in Pennsylvania in 1708 and Thomas Broom, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1716. John Broom settled in Jamaica in 1722. John Broom settled in Virginia in 1727.

Some of the people with the surname Broom who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Coena Serbel Broom landed in Pennsylvania in 1803 and Luke C Broom at the age of 25 landed in New York in 1812.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Broom who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Elizabeth Broom, who was an English prisoner from Somerset aboard the “Anna Maria” in October 1851, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Broom who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Hannah Broom, who was a servant at the age of 19, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Waipa” in 1876

Here is the population distribution of the last name Broom: United States 5,973; England 4,135; Wales 293; Australia 813; Ireland 1,529; Canada 261; South Africa 1,151; New Zealand 258; Scotland 210; Germany 168; Sweden 87.

Notable People:

Christina Broom (1862–1939), was a British photographer and cameraman.

Jacob Broom (1752–1810), was an American businessman and lawmaker.

Jacob Broom (congressman) (1808–1864), was a United States Congress member from Pennsylvania.

James M. Broom (1776–1850), was an American politician and lawmaker.

Mark Broom (born 1971), is a British techno singer and DJ.

Neil Broom (born 1983), is a New Zealand cricket player.

Robert Broom (1866–1951), was a South African archaeologist.

Broom Family Gift Ideas

Browse Broom family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Caunton, co. Nottingham, originally of Broome Hall, co. York). Blazon: Sable on a chevron argent three sprigs of broom slipped vert. Crest—A cockatrice argent winged azure beaked, legged, combed, and wattled gules.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cockatrice
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P86
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
12. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P270
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100