Cane Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Cane Family Coat of Arms

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Cane Coat of Arms Meaning

Cane Name Origin & History

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Cane Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Cane blazon are the heart, bend and bezant. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and or.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The heart is represented by the conventional symbol that we see today on playing cards. In later arms it can also appear emflamed and crowned. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Heart Guillim, the 17th century heraldic author, believes that it shows the holder to be a “man of sincerity…who speaks truth from his heart”. 8A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P184

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Cane Name

Cane Origin:

France, Wales

Origins of Cane:

This interesting and unusual name has two main origins. The first origin of the name is from the Olde French word “Cane,” which means a stick and is a nickname for a tall, thin stick-like person. Possibly, a geographical name for a person who resided in a wet area with sticks or a metonymic professional name for a collector of sticks, widely used in the Middle Ages as a floor covering and for producing small baskets. Similarly, it could be of Celtic origin from the Welsh word “cain” which means handsome. “Keina” is a woman’s name. One Jane Cane married Phillip Watkins in St. Georges Chapel, Mayfair, London in 1747.

Variations:

More common variations are: Caine, Caney, Cayne, Canne, Coane, Cuane, Caneo, Caune, Canea, Canoe.

England:

The origins of the surname Cane found in Derry, where people held a family seat from early times.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Roger de Cane, dated about 1273, in the “Hundred Rolls of Lincolnshire.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Cane settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Cane who settled in the United States in the 17th century included George Cane, who landed in Virginia in 1622. Patrick Cane, who landed in Virginia in 1637. Margarett Cane, who landed in Virginia in 1643. Edward Cane, who arrived in Maryland in 1648. Thomas Cane, who landed in Maryland in 1649

Some of the people with the surname Cane who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Hugh Cane, who landed in Virginia in 1716. Germain Cane arrived in Louisiana in 1719. Joanis Cane landed in Pennsylvania in 1741. Roger Cane, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1745. Catherine Cane, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1746-1747.

The following century saw many more Cane surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Cane who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Alexander Cane, who landed in America in 1803. Charles Cane, who landed in New London, Conn in 1811. James Cane, who arrived in America in 1811.

Canada:

People with the surname Cane settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in 18th and 19th Some of the individuals with the name Cane who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Arthur Cane, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749. James Cane, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749-1752.

The following century saw much more Cane surnames come. Some of the people with the surname Cane who settled in Canada in the 19th century included James Cane arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig “Ann & Mary” from Cork, Ireland. Henry Cane, who arrived in Victoria, British Columbia in 1862.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Cane who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Patrick Cane, was an English prisoner from Middlesex, who shifted aboard the “Andromeda” in November 1832, settling in New South Wales, Australia. Biddy Cane arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Hooghly” in 1846. G. Cane arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Athenian” in 1849. Henry Cane was an English prisoner from Staffordshire, who shifted aboard the “Adelaide” in August 1849, settling in Van Diemen’s Land and Harbor Phillip, Australia.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Cane: Italy 3,740; United States 2,948; Argentina 2,553; England 2,463; Philippines 2,449; Albania 946; Australia 847; South Africa 621; France 563; Canada 464.

Notable People:

Mrs. W. O. Cane was an American leader.

Rudolph C. Cane was an American congressman.

Richard P. Cane was an American leader.

Cane Family Gift Ideas

Browse Cane family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: None. Blazon: Sa. a bend or, betw. three bezants. Crest—A human heart gu. eharged with a cinquefoil or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Heart
8. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P184
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122