Cantell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Cantell Family Coat of Arms

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Cantell Coat of Arms Meaning

Cantell Name Origin & History

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Cantell Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Cantell blazon are the star, annulet and canton. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, gules and or .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77More modern arms might use the term star explicitly to refer to the celestial object, in which case it is usually known as a blazing star 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Star

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

“The canton stands very high among honourable bearings”, according to Wade, a noted symbologist 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48. The canton is a square shape, normally occupying the dexter chief of the shield. An early example is SUTTON, Bishop of Lincoln in the 13th century, who bore “argent a canton sable”. It occupies less space than a quarter and hence is sometimes added to an existing shield to difference branches of the same family, or, when a charge is added to it, to indicate some honour has been recieved 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Canton. Wade remarks, that, in common with all square features can be associated with the virtue of“constancy”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Cantell Name

Cantell Origin:

England

Origins of Cantell:

The Anglo- Norman Conquest of Ireland lead by Strongbow introduced the first non-Gaelic elements into Irish nomenclature. These Anglo- Normans brought some traditions to Ireland that not readily appeared within Gaelic system of hereditary surnames. One of the best examples of this is the local surname. Local surnames, such as Cantell, acquired from the name of a place or a geographical feature where the person resided, held land, or was born. These surnames were very common in England but were almost non-existent within Ireland previous to the Invasion. The earliest surnames of this type came from Normandy, but as the Normans moved, they often created names about where they lived. Therefore, some settlers eventually took names from Irish places. Originally, these place names were prefixed by de, which means from in French. This type of prefix was eventually either made a part of the surname, if the place name started with a vowel, or dropped entirely. The Cantell family originally resided in the place called Cauntelo in Northern France. Early medieval deeds are recording the surname Cantell as de Cantelupo, the Latin equivalent of the Norman name de Cauntelo. Before their migration to Ireland, the Cantell family spent a long time in England. The shrine of St. Thomas de Cantelupe, who was the last English saint canonized before the Reformation, is in Hereford Cathedral.Church officials and old authors often spelled early surnames as they sounded. This practice often resulted in many spelling variations of even a single name. Early versions of the name Cantell included as Cantillon, Cantilon, Cantlin, Cantilupe, Cantlowe, Cantelowe, Cantell, Cantillion, Cantlon, Cantlow and many more.

Variations:

More common variations are: Cantwell, Cantello, Cantuell, Cantelli, Cantella, Cantelle, Cantiell, Cantdell, Canttell.

Ireland:

The surname Cantell first appeared in Division Kerry (Iristhiarrai) part of the earlier Division Desmond (14th-17th centuries), located in Southwestern Ireland, in Munster province, where they held a family seat at Ballyheige where they had given lands after the Norman invasion in 1172 by Strongbow. As one would expect, not all of the family moved to Ireland. Bingley in the West Riding of Yorkshire was an old family seat. “This place is one of the thirty-two lordships given by the Invader to Erneis de Berun, from whose descendants it moved to the Paganells and the Gants, and afterwards to the Cantilupe family.” The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. Many of the people with surname Cantell had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the surname Cantell who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Mary Cantell, who landed in Maryland in the year 1680.

New-Zealand:

Some of the individuals with the surname Cantell who landed in New-Zealand in the 19th century included Charles Cantell at the age of 25, arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Bombay” in the year 1865. Susannah Cantell at the age of 24, arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Bombay” in the year 1865. Joseph Cantell at the age of 16, a labourer, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Avalanche” in the year 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Cantell: United States 198; Finland 133; England 97; New Zealand 47; Australia 24; Canada 23; Sweden 22; Scotland 20; Denmark 1; Wales 1.

Notable People:

Christopher M. Cantell (born June 1961) is an American businessperson born in St Albans, Vermont. He is best known for his work in supercomputers in the 80s, his public relations and advertising businesses and most recently his technology and investment enterprises in the telecommunications industry.

Kari Cantell was a Finnish scientist best known for his work on interferons.

Saara Cantell was a Finnish film director.

Cantell Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Ireland). Gu. a star of eight points within an orle of five annulets or, a canton erm.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Star
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Canton