Catley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Catley Family Coat of Arms

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Catley Coat of Arms Meaning

Catley Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Cattley.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Catley. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Catley Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Catley blazon are the escallop, lozenge and fesse. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, gules and azure .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the lozenge Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. It can appear on its own, voided (with the background visible through the middle), and can also be conjoined, whereby adjacent lozenges touch point-to-point. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge Guillim groups the lozenge with all square shapes as being symbolic of “verity, probity, constancy and equity”. 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Catley Name

Catley Origin:

England

Origins of Catley:

This interesting and unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a geographical name from a place thus called east of Hereford in Herefordshire, or from Catley in Lincolnshire. The earlier place was noted as “Catesley” in the 1242 Feet of Fines for Herefordshire, and as “Cattelegh” in the 1251 Charter Rolls, whereas the latter showed as “Catteleia” and “Kattele” in the Pipe Rolls of Lincolnshire, dated 1197 and 1230 respectively. Both places are so called from the Middle English “catte,” from the Olde English pre 7th Century “catt,” which means cat, with the Old English “leah,” a meadow or clearing. So, either a clearing haunted wild cats, or “Cat’s clearing,” from the use of “Catt” as a byname. Geographical surnames advanced when the old residents of a place shifted to another area, frequently to search for work, and were best recognized by the name of their birthplace. In November 1562, Annys Catley and William Fulgam married in Westborough cum Doddington, Lincolnshire, and in January 1577 Elizabeth Catley married a William Unet in Bosbury, Herefordshire. Ann Catley (1745-1789), was a vocalist of fame and a greatly famous performer at Dublin, 1763-1770, and in London, 1770-1784.

Variations:

More common variations are: Cattley, Coatley, Cautley, Caitley, Cateley, Catleya, Cawtley, Catly, Catle, Cattleya.

England:

The surname Catley first appeared in Bedfordshire (Old English: Bedanfordscir), was found in Southeast-central England, an earlier part of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia, where they held a family seat from very ancient times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Catley, dated about the year 1540, in the “Castle Donnington, Leicestershire.” It was during the time of King Henry V111, who was known to be the “Bluff King Hal” dated 1509-1547. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Catley had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

Canada:

People with the surname Catley who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Jos Catley, who came to Canada in 1817.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Catley who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Clark Catley arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Ganges” in the same year 1839. Catherine Catley, Hannah Catley and Sophia Catley, also arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Ganges” in 1839. Joseph Catley at the age of 38, arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship “Eparninondas.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the individuals with the surname Catley who landed in New-Zealand in the 19th century included Sarah Catley, Zachariah Catley, Clara Catley, aged 4, and John Catley, all arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Bolton” in 1840.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Catley: England 834; New Zealand 282; Australia 251; United States 226; Canada 98; Wales 79; Scotland 33; France 2; India 1; Nigeria 1.

Notable People:

Ann Catley (1745–1789), was an English singer and actress.

Bob Catley (born 1947), is an English singer and composer.

Bob Catley (politician) (born 1942), is an Australian Labor leader.

Christine Cole Catley (1922– 2011), was a New Zealand scholar, journalist, and writer.

Glenn Catley (born 1972), is a British retired professional fighter.

Gwen Catley (1906–1996), English coloratura soprano

Has Catley (1915–1975), was a New Zealand rugby union player.

Matthew Catley (born 1975), is an English cricket player.

Russell Catley (born 1973), is an English cricket player.

Steph Catley (born 1994), is an Australian football player.

Timothy Catley (born 1977), is an English cricket player.

Catley Family Gift Ideas

Browse Catley family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Gu. six escallops ar. Crest—A hand erect holding a sealed letter ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse