Charleton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Charleton Family Coat of Arms

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Charleton Coat of Arms Meaning

Charleton Name Origin & History

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Charleton Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Charleton blazon are the pheon, swan and griffin. The two main tinctures (colors) are ermine and azure.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

Wade suggests that the appearance of a swan in a coat of arms is perhaps an indication of a musical person, or a “ lover of poetry and harmony”. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78 It is generally shown in a lifelike aspect and colouring, although it may be leaked and legged with other colours. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan. It is a popular charge, both on the shield itself and impress, sometimes sitting and sometimes rising as if about to take off in flight. 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]14Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Charleton Name

Charleton Origin:

Wales

Origins of Charleton:

From the old Celtic culture that lived-in Wales came the surname Charleton. The first holders of this name picked it when they lived in any of such places as Carlton in Bedfordshire, Cambridge, Durham, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, Northumberland, Suffolk, or the East Riding of Yorkshire, or in one of the places called Carleton in Cumberland Lancashire, Norfolk, or the West Riding of Yorkshire. One of the reasons for the many entries of the place name is that the name means “farmstead or land of the freemen.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Chearleton, Charletton, Charlton, Charelton, Charalton, Charliton, Sharleton, Charloton, Charltoin, Charilton.

England:

The surname Charleton first appeared in Herefordshire, but one family appeared at Whitton in Shropshire in early times. “Here is a farmhouse formerly a seat of the Charltons, where James II. visited: a chamber in it contains some superior tapestry of that period.”

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Charleton had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

Canada:

People with the surname Charleton settled in Canada in the 19th century. Some of the people with the surname Charleton who came to Canada in the 19th century included Bridget Charleton at the age of 4, arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship “Edward Reid” in 1833. Thomas Charleton at the age of 1, arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship “Edward Reid” in 1833.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Charleton who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Robert Charleton arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Santipore” in 1850.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Charleton: United States 274; England 237; Ireland 60; New Zealand 54; Canada 53; France 49; Australia 33; Scotland 26; Northern Ireland 3; Brazil 3.

Notable People:

Walter Charleton (February 1619 –April 1707) was a natural philosopher and English author. According to Jon Parkin, he was “the main conduit for the transmission of Epicurean ideas to England”. He was the son of the rector of Shepton Mallett in Somerset, where he was born February 1619. He got his early education from his father, and when sixteen entered Magdalen Hall, Oxford, under the tuition of John Wilkins. At the very young age of 22 (1641), he got the degree of M.D. and in the same year was selected as physician to Charles I, who was then at Oxford. In 1650, Charleton settled in London, and in April admitted a candidate of the College of Physicians. A royalist, he was selected as physician to the exiled King Charles II but remained in London writing, in Russell Street, Covent Garden.

Robert Charleton (1809–1872) was a Quaker, Recorded Minister and an important citizen of Bristol, England. He was a patron and ran a pin-making factory which was recorded for its good employment practices. He was an advocate of total avoidance and peaceful relations between nations. He was the son of James and Elizabeth Charleton of Bristol. James died at Ashley Hill, Bristol, in 1847. After a business training under H. F. Cotterell, a land surveyor at Bath, became the proprietor of a pin manufactory at Kingswood, near Bristol, in 1833, and continued that business until his retirement in 1852. He married, in Dec 1849, Catherine Brewster, the eldest daughter of Thomas Fox of Ipswich. He died at his residence, Ashley Down, near Bristol, in Dec 1872.

Brent Charleton (born April 1982) is a Canadian-New Zealand, professional basketball player. He played for the New Zealand Breakers in the Australian National Basketball League. He joined Carson Graham Secondary and then Simon Fraser University where he passed the school’s all-time scoring record set by Jay Triano. (Triano set the record over four seasons while Charleton’s mark set over five.)

Charleton Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Guissons, co. Sussex). Erm. on a bend sa. three pheons ar. Crest—An arm embowed habited couped at the elbow gu. cuffed erm. holding in the hand ppr. a broad arrow.
2) Az. three swans ar.
3) Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three griffins’ heads erased sa.
4) Az. a chev. or, betw. three swans ar.
5) (Hesleyside, co. Northumberland; descended from Adam de Charleton, lord of the manor of Charlton, in Tyndale, co Northumberland, a.d. 1303; Sir Edward Charleton, of Hesleyside, great-great-grandson of Edward Charleton, of Charleton Tower, in Tyndale, and of Helseyside, near Bellingham, was created a baronet in 1645). Or, a lion ramp. gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
14. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150