Clack Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Clack Family Coat of Arms

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Clack Coat of Arms Meaning

Clack Name Origin & History

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Clack Coat of Arms Meaning

The main device (symbol) in the Clack blazon is the eagle. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, erminois and gules .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Ermine and its variants is a very ancient pattern. It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. Erminois is a variant in which the field is or (gold) and the ermine tails sable (black).

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Clack Name

Clack Origin:

England

Origins of Clack:

This unusual name acquires from the Olde English name Clacc frequently given to a gossiper or one who clattered. The first documentation of the given name is an old one “Clac de Fugelburne,” Cambridgeshire, near the year 975. The surname first appears in the second half of the 12th Century. An equivalent spelling Clac registered in 1327, in the premium Rolls of Somerset. In the year 1774, one, John Clack married an Ann Jeffreis in St. Georges parish, Hanover Square, London. The name is listed in Glamorgan, Llantwitfarde (Wales) in the same century. John Henry Clack, son of Henry and Ann Clack, was named there in December 1868. The royal symbol given to the family of Herefordshire and Wallingford, division Berkshire in November 1768 has the decoration of a red shield and an eagle.

Variations:

More common variations are: Clacke, Clacky, Cloack, Clacko, Chlack, Clauck, Culack, Colack, Clak, Clac.

England:

The origins of the surname Clack found in Herefordshire where people held a family seat from early times. Some say better before the success of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings1066 A.D.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Godricius Clacca, dated about 1169. It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be the “The Builder of Churches,” dated 1154-1180. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

Ireland:

Many of the people with the surname Clack had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Clack settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Clack who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Rich Clack landed in Virginia in the year 1663. Mr. Clack arrived in Maryland in the year 1695.

Some of the people with the surname Clack who settled in the United States in the 18th century included James Clack would eventually settle in Virginia in 1723. Abraham Clack landed in Maryland in the year 1774.

The following century saw much more Clack surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Clack who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Pat Clack at the age of 20 came to America in the year in 1822. Agnes Clack, who with her husband John and brother settled in New York in the year 1823.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Clack who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Richard Clack and Richard Clack Jr.; both landed in Nova Scotia in the same year 1749.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Clack who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Noah Clack at the age of 22, who was a farmer arrived in South Australia aboard the ship “Melbourne” in the year 1858.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Clack: United States 3,876; England 2,038; Australia 477; Canada 219; South Africa 3,361; Scotland 66; Wales 113; Russia 60; France 73; Brazil 111.

Notable People:

Arthur Baker-Clack was an Australian artist and entertainer.

Boyd Clack was a Welsh author, artist, and singer.

Brenda Clack was born in July 1945. She is an African-American representative from the U.S. state of Michigan. She is a senator and was until 2009 a representative of Michigan.

Charles Clack was an American congressman.

Jennifer A. Clack was a paleontologist

Jim Clack was a famous American football player.

Kris Clack was born in July 1977. He is a resigned American basketball player who played college ball for the University of Texas.

Peter Clack is a rock and roll drummer. He was a drummer of hard rock band AC/DC. The famous band consists of Malcolm Young (rhythm guitar), Angus Young (lead guitar), Dave Evans (lead vocals) and Rob Bailey (bass guitar).

Zoanne Clack was a television director, author, story writer and cartoonist.

Clack Stone was an Army commander during the year 1832 in the Black Hawk War.

Clack Family Gift Ideas

Browse Clack family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Herefordshire, and Wallingford, co. Berks; granted 13 Nov. 1768). Blazon: Gu. an eagle displ. erm. within a bordure engr. erminois. Crest—A demi eagle or, winged erm.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74