Copeland Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Copeland Family Coat of Arms

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Copeland Coat of Arms Meaning

Copeland Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Copland, Coupland, Coppland.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Copeland. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Copeland Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Copeland blazon are the bar, boar, trefoil and mullet. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and gules .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 16A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Copeland Name

Copeland Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Copeland can be traced to Northumberland and Cumberland, and is a locational surname for these places. The first of these possible origins is that it may have been derived from a location, somewhere with the name of Copeland. Because the surname of Copeland is locational, this means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. This locational name was Coupland, which comes from the Old Norse word “kaupland” which can be translated to mean “bought land.” This is importantly named because land was rarely bought or sold during the Middle Ages, rather it was handed down from one generation to the next.

Variations:

More common variations are: Coupleand, Coopeland, Copeland, Coppleand, Copeeland, Copelanda, Copelannd, Copelannd, Caopeland, Copelland

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Copeland was found in the country of England, and in the year of 1204. One by the name of Samson de Copland was mentioned in the document referred to as the Pleas before the King and His Justice. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King John, who was known as and commonly referred to throughout history as the “Lackland.” King John ruled from the year 1199 to the year 1216. Other mentions of the surname of Copeland in England include William de Copeland, who was mentioned in the Assize Court Rolls of Northumberland in the year 1256, and Thomas Coupleland in the the Feet Fines of Essex in the year 1376. Within church records, the surname of Copeland is found in the marriage of Edward Copeland to Katheren Dodge in 1557 at Christ Church, Greyfriars, Newgate. Those who bear this surname live all around the country of England. However, those areas with the higher concentration of those who beear the surname, compared to other parts of the country, are the counties of Northumberland, Durham, Yorkshire, and Lancashire.

Scotland:

Those who bear the surname of Copeland can be found in small quantities throughtout the Scottish countryside. The areas with the higher concentration of people who are known by the surname of Copeland are the counties of Lanarkshire and Midlothian.

United States of America:

During the European Migration, it was common for these disgruntled European citizens to migrate to the United States in search of something better for them and their families. The United States promised the freedom of religion, the freedom from unfair taxation, and the capability to find work and own land. Many citizens came to America, which was referred to as The Colonies and The New World. Among these citizens were people who carried the surname of Copeland. The first recorded person to enter the United States of America and bore the surname was one Christopher Copeland, who arrived in the state of Virginia in the year 1631. Those who bear the surname of Copeland in the US can be found in the states of Texas, Ohio, Virginia, South Carolina, Missouri, Ohio, Alabama and Tennessee.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Copeland:

United States 64,030, England 5,781, Canada 3,420, Australia 1,807, South Africa 1,187, Scotland 820, Northern Ireland 775, Jamaica 589, Ireland 470, New Zealand 402

Notable People:

Aaron Copeland (1900-1990) who was a classical composer from America, and was also a composition teacher, and writer who was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1964

Brian Copeland (born in 1974) who was an actor from America, a comedian, radio talk show host, playwright, and author

Ray Copeland (1926-1843) who was a jazz trumpet player from America, and a teacher, and the father of the drummer who was named Keith Copeland

Jim Copeland (1945-2010) who was a former NFL offensive lineman from America who played in the 1960’s era

James Copeland (1823-1857) who was an outlaw, and was a co-leader of the 60 member Wages and Copeland Clan, who was executed by hanging

George Copeland (1882-1971) who was a classical pianist from America

Joan Copeland (born in 1922) who was an actress from America, and was the younger sister of the playwright Arthur Miller

Royal Samuel Copeland (1868-1938) who was an academic from America, and was a homeopathic physician and politician, and was a United States Senator from New York from the year 1923-1938

Copeland Family Gift Ideas

Browse Copeland family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (London and Bootle, co. Cumberland). Ar. two bars gu. debruised by a bend sa. over all a canton of the second. Crest—A lion pass. ppr.
2) (granted to William Taylor Copeland, Esq., Lord Mayor of London, 1836). Motto—Benigno numine. Or, two bars gu. in chief three trefoils slipped vert, on a bend over all az. as many boars’ heads erased ar. Crest—A nag’s head erased ar. charged on the neck with a trefoil vert betw. two holly branches fructed ppr.
3) (confirmed 1744 to Benjamin Copeland, of Belnagan, co. Meath). Or, on a cross sa. betw. four trefoils slipped vert, five mullets ar. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet a swan’s head and neck ppr.
4) Ar. a cross sa. Crest—A castle triple-towered ppr. ensigned with a flag gu. charged with a cross ar.
5) (Boston, co. Lincoln). Ar. two bars and a canton gu. over all a bend sa.
6) Ar. two bars and a canton gu. (another, az.).
7) Gu. on a fesse or, three trefoils vert.
8) Or, on a cross sa. betw. four trefoils slipped vert five mullets ar.
9) Gu. on a fesse ar. (another, or) three hawthorn leaves vert.
10) Ar. on a cross sa. a mullet pierced of the first.
11) (Twickenham, co. Middlesex). Or, on a cross sa. betw. four oak leaves vert five mullets of the field. Crest—A nag’s head couped ar. bridled betw. two laurel branches in perspective vert.
12) (London). Or, on a cross sa. betw. four trefoils vert five mullets ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
16. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109